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What kind of wood was used to make an old ladder?

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Forum topic by InstantSiv posted 09-25-2014 02:35 PM 2277 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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InstantSiv

259 posts in 1058 days


09-25-2014 02:35 PM

I have an old ladder that is way too unstable to use as a ladder. I want to get rid of it quick before I need to use a ladder and stupidly use it because it’s the only thing available.

The question I have is what kind of wood was used for old ladders and were they treated in any way? Everything is riveted and the steps are dadoed into the sides so If I broke it down it would be small pieces for a craft type project.

Thanks


16 replies so far

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1176 days


#1 posted 09-25-2014 02:47 PM

Would think ash or beech mainly. But i guess a lot of differnet, local woods can be used.. You can perhaps show a photo of it?

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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Arlin Eastman

3553 posts in 2024 days


#2 posted 09-25-2014 02:50 PM

Roy Underhill said that were was a law stating for the rungs to be made from Ash. I do not know what episode maybe season 4

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1759 days


#3 posted 09-25-2014 02:53 PM

I think the main rails were douglas fir, at least the old one I cut up was. Can still be used as a rustic pot rack hung from the ceiling or a towel bar leaning up against the wall or some other countryish accent. They weren’t supposed to be finished with any kind of paint because you couldn’t see if a rung was cracked.

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Arlin Eastman

3553 posts in 2024 days


#4 posted 09-25-2014 02:56 PM

You guys and gals have to see this Cherry log being auctioned off.

4th picture down.

All I can say is WOW :0

http://www.hearnehardwoods.com/hearne_hardwoods_open_house/2014/cherry_auction/cherry_auction.html

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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InstantSiv

259 posts in 1058 days


#5 posted 09-25-2014 02:57 PM

Sorry for the quality of the pic. Also the ladder is upside down because the steps are textured to increase grip. What are the rungs? The steps?

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4451 posts in 3423 days


#6 posted 09-25-2014 04:12 PM

Looks like doug. fir to me.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 984 days


#7 posted 09-25-2014 04:24 PM

A ladder made entirely out of ash would be pretty heavy, I would think, but rungs made out of ash would be a good idea, if you don’t use metal support rods, and the rails, top and shelf out of a lightweight softwood, like fir.

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Woodendeavor

276 posts in 2069 days


#8 posted 09-25-2014 04:47 PM

May not help you but this is a cool video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbu1HVFELog

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Dez

1162 posts in 3540 days


#9 posted 09-25-2014 04:57 PM

Fir… Very common next to oak.
Almost all of the wooden step ladders and wood extension ladders I’ve used were made of fir – light weight/strength ratio respective to other species.
The only rule I was told about is that to meet certain regulations etc, the rungs had to be riven so that their is minimal grain run out/cross grained areas.

-- Folly ever comes cloaked in opportunity!

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3551 posts in 1230 days


#10 posted 09-25-2014 05:24 PM

Keep the ladder. They make beautiful shelves. Let me know if you need some ideas.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1759 days


#11 posted 09-25-2014 11:44 PM

InstantSiv’s pic looks like Southern Yellow Pine to me.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1939 days


#12 posted 09-26-2014 12:51 AM

I also think that it is douglas fir.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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exelectrician

2327 posts in 1890 days


#13 posted 09-26-2014 05:35 AM

The only to make sure a wood ladder is safe is to burn it. Period – I will NOT climb a wood ladder.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2409 posts in 2385 days


#14 posted 09-26-2014 12:30 PM

Yellow pine is my thought. Does it really matter what the name of the wood is?

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1759 days


#15 posted 09-26-2014 12:35 PM

I said Doug Fir before you pictured it to be a step ladder. Extension ladders were fir. I spent many years as a housepainter putting up wooden extension ladders. A real bitch after it rained and they were soaked.

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