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Centering a large hole router base

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Forum topic by paxorion posted 09-24-2014 05:09 PM 962 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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paxorion

1102 posts in 1507 days


09-24-2014 05:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip router question

I’m curious what accessories or tips on how I can center a large hole router sub-base. I currently use a small Dewalt centering cone, which works for I believe up to ~1.5” diameter holes, but won’t work for some of my 2 to 2.5” hole sub-bases.

Are there any recommendations on alternate centering pin/cones or tips that others may be able to share?

-- paxorion


9 replies so far

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pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2275 days


#1 posted 09-24-2014 05:24 PM

For edge profiling and many freehand operations, a centered base plate is not critical. When cutting dados with the large baseplate, try not to twist the router, and you should be fine.

Another method is to replace the screws on the router base with tapered head machine screws. That way the base will self-center.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#2 posted 09-24-2014 06:56 PM

One thing you could do (I’ve done this once or twice) is put a very large router bit in the motor, and then install the base. One that closely matches the size of the hole would be ideal. By rotating the bit you should be able to see close/ identical (or near identical) clearance around the edge of the bit. But I also agree with pintodeluxe, it’s very seldom that would be important. Needless to say, the router is unplugged while you do this…..and tighten the bit with wrenches to unsure it’s centered in the collet.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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paxorion

1102 posts in 1507 days


#3 posted 09-24-2014 07:39 PM

Hmm, so it does sound like I may be over-thinking this and there may or may not be a need for me too concerned with full accuracy when centering the sub-base. I presume where and when it would matter, the router bit to be used will be a smaller one, where one of my smaller bases and my current centering cone would be sufficient?

-- paxorion

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MrUnix

4214 posts in 1661 days


#4 posted 09-24-2014 07:47 PM

Only time I usually bother centering the thing is when I’m doing template work with a guide bushing.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#5 posted 09-25-2014 11:16 AM

Same here (as Brad) about the only time I worry about it is when I use a bushing.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View dusty2's profile

dusty2

321 posts in 2891 days


#6 posted 09-25-2014 12:18 PM


I m curious what accessories or tips on how I can center a large hole router sub-base. I currently use a small Dewalt centering cone, which works for I believe up to ~1.5” diameter holes, but won t work for some of my 2 to 2.5” hole sub-bases.

Are there any recommendations on alternate centering pin/cones or tips that others may be able to share?

- paxorion

Centering is of little importance unless you have round sub bases. Assuming you do:

I would make an insert that fits snugly into the sub base. It sounds as though you have more than one and that they are in the range of 2”-2.5”. To do what I am suggesting, you need one for each different size cut out.

Drill a small hole in a piece of hard board or 1/4” MDF. This hole will become the center hole. Around that “center” hole, cut the hard board into a circle that is just a little bit larger than the cut out. Now sand (hopefully on a belt sander) the work piece down to the proper size circular piece. You now have a centering jig for that sub base. Repeat for each sub base with a different size hole.

-- Making Sawdust Safely

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7172 posts in 2038 days


#7 posted 09-25-2014 01:52 PM

If you have a hole saw cutter maybe you can center it with that.

View rick1955's profile

rick1955

258 posts in 892 days


#8 posted 09-25-2014 08:18 PM

This question is so easy. There are times when it is convenient to have a large hole and centered baseplate. Start with and over sized baseplate. It doesn’t even have to be perfectly round. Screw it to the router base . One way is to use a small router and a trammel and insert one end of the trammel directly into the colllet of the router you want to center the baseplate on. The other way is to put a pin in a piece of plywood that fits your collet of the router with the baseplate you want to trim. Screw one corner of the plywood to make a pivot point. Another sort of trammel arm. Then you swing it into a sander of your choicw and rotate the router to true the circle. Clamp it obviously. I’ve even done it on a table saw. I don’t know if you can understand the concept I’m explaining but in my experince most jigs are self designed by the need itself. You just have to see it. It’s really already there in a sense. A matter of connecting the dots.

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

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runswithscissors

2183 posts in 1487 days


#9 posted 09-26-2014 07:24 AM

I wonder if you could chuck a forstner bit in the collet—they usually have 1/2” shafts, don’t they? The are available in quite large sizes, though most sets stop at about 2 1/8” or so. This might work in a plunge router. A speed reducer would also be desirable. It also might be dangerous. I’ve never tried it.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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