LumberJocks

Can you help identify this blacksmith-made tool?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 09-23-2014 05:18 PM 1788 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2312 days


09-23-2014 05:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: vintage tool pliers cutters blacksmith question

It may not be old. It may not be a woodworking tool. But it is very well made and precise.

The spring that keeps the tool open is especially elegant.

I found it in the kitchen implement section at the local GoodWill.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


26 replies so far

View Terry Ferguson's profile

Terry Ferguson

203 posts in 2129 days


#1 posted 09-23-2014 06:30 PM

It certainly looks like an older version of a side cutter perhaps for wire or nails – may also have been used by a farrier to trim horse hooves, but it does seem too small for those uses. Beautifully designed and crafted. Especially like the curved handle end that acts as a stop against the soon end of the other. In other words, I really don’t know what it is specifically for – waiting to hear from others.

-- Terry Ferguson, Bend Oregon

View greg48's profile

greg48

588 posts in 2219 days


#2 posted 09-23-2014 06:45 PM

Was going with the toe nail cutter theory, but can’t imagine one being in the kitchen implement section.

-- Greg, No. Cal. - "Gaudete in Domino Semper"

View Loren's profile

Loren

8301 posts in 3109 days


#3 posted 09-23-2014 07:06 PM

Smiths do use nippers for cutting metal in smithing,
so they could be for that.

Nice find. I buy stuff like that whenever I find it
cheap amongst bric-a-brac.

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

361 posts in 912 days


#4 posted 09-23-2014 07:32 PM

It doesn’t close all the way, and has a positive stop at the back of the handle. I bet it’s for repeatedly sizing something the same working with (blown?) glass.

-- Nicholas

View Pezking7p's profile

Pezking7p

3097 posts in 1113 days


#5 posted 09-23-2014 07:48 PM

I think it’s just a fancy pair of tongs for holding thick bar stock. The spring return is pretty uncommon on blacksmith tongs but not unusually so.

-- -Dan

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2312 days


#6 posted 09-23-2014 08:16 PM

Nicholas: It doesn’t close all the way, and has a positive stop at the back of the handle. I bet it’s for repeatedly sizing something the same working with (blown?) glass.

This has possibilities. He is very observant; it doesn’t close all the way so there is no shearing action, but it could size or score something to a fixed dimension. Interesting, though, that it is not adjustable.

I Googled “glass blowing tools” and found nothing like it. I did find tools that short, though, which is a stroke in Nicholas’ favor.

The glass thing involves rotating and that got me to wondering if it is used to clean a groove perhaps, while the cylinder was being turned.

Fun stuff. And as for finding it in kitchen stuff, that’s not an unusual thing at our thrift stores. I’m not critical that occasionally something is misstocked. It just makes the whole thing more adventuresome.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

361 posts in 912 days


#7 posted 09-23-2014 08:23 PM

I RARELY find tools at Goodwill. I purchased a large crescent wrench once, and have seen a router or two. I think they are really picky about what they put on the floor, and wholesale/trash everything else. I’ve had people tell me otherwise, but why else would they have a shipping dock with a giant dumpster and trucks picking up plastic wrapped pallets?

-- Nicholas

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1175 days


#8 posted 09-23-2014 08:32 PM

Look a bit like those pliers used to cut brown sugar lumps in the early days..

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3047 days


#9 posted 09-23-2014 09:40 PM

For circumsizing as used by Scottish raabi’s They don’t charge for the procedure but they seem to get by on the tips. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Loren's profile

Loren

8301 posts in 3109 days


#10 posted 09-23-2014 10:27 PM

That’s funny.

View Picklehead's profile (online now)

Picklehead

1015 posts in 1391 days


#11 posted 09-23-2014 11:51 PM

Don’t forget that blacksmiths frequently doubled as the town dentist!

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

601 posts in 2369 days


#12 posted 09-24-2014 03:15 AM

As far as it being a farrier tool….......... I have something like this

The one I have is very similar, handles are a little longer, but other than that about the same

Mine is used to “pinch” a horse’s hoof to determine EXACTLY where it hurts on the hoof and how much or how little pressure is needed to assess the severity of the problem.

The long handles are needed to exert enough pressure to actually determine the (sometimes very small) area on the hoof where it hurts

Just a thought

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2312 days


#13 posted 09-25-2014 01:15 PM

Thanks CPlus. I have a farrier friend whom I will query.

BTW, I recalled yesterday the most curious thing I’ve found misfiled at a thrift store: In this case, a GoodWill, and there it was, in the kitchen section: A Bench Cookie.

True story.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View BJODay's profile

BJODay

512 posts in 1404 days


#14 posted 09-25-2014 07:02 PM

”Mine is used to “pinch” a horse’s hoof to determine EXACTLY where it hurts on the hoof”

I don’t think I’d want to be next to a horse when I found that sore spot.

BJ

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

601 posts in 2369 days


#15 posted 09-25-2014 07:46 PM

Lee, the one thing in my mind that argues with my opinion that this tool is used as a hoof tester is none of mine have a stop. They close all the way. That enables us to put as little or as much pressure on the hoof as is needed to test the sore spot.

BJOGAY

Not lecturing but if you get me talking about horses you are going to have to put up with me until I run out of steam.

Testing the even sorest hoof is very safe if done correctly. Most guys will have 30’ of thick soft rope that goes around the horses neck via a bowline knot and then down and around the the sore hoof…........or any hoof you want to look at for that matter…....and that rope around the sore hoof is pulled tight and looped back through the neck loop and tied off with a safety knot. You would be surprised how high we raise the sore hoof….... right up until just under the belly. Unless I am working with a horse that has been shod and worked on for years, I will take a little hoof, put it back and let him rest and know everything is all right. Then raise the hoof a little higher, hold for 30 seconds and put it back down so he can rest and feel comfortable he is not going to get hurt and learn to stand on three legs and then usually by then I can tie up the hoof for as long as needed. Will he jerk if I squeeze a sore spot, sure, but that is what we are looking for. The tender spot. No reason at all to ever get hurt around a horse if you are careful, thoughtful and know what you are doing. I had a maiden (3-year-old) mare with her first colt this Spring. She wanted to nurse, the foal needed the colostrum, but she was spooked by this other little critter trying to suck on her. So, I tied up a rear leg, the mare could not move…...the baby suckles…. and never had too do it again. Horsemanship is an acquired skill, a sense of animals and common sense. Life is all the richer because of our opportunity and obligation to husband this animals.

p.s. Don’t try the tie the leg up on a horny bull. Now THAT will get you, your truck, your trailer and probably the bulled in a train-wreck. Been down that road also.

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com