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Cherry Log - How would you have it milled?

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Forum topic by gts78 posted 09-22-2014 02:53 PM 1222 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gts78

12 posts in 819 days


09-22-2014 02:53 PM

Just looking for some suggestions here. My parents recently took down a wild cherry tree and told me I could have the log. I need to get it off their lot and have help lined up for this week.

I plan on having it milled and kiln dried but have no specific projects in mind, but anything I would do would like be on the small side (turnings, mayne an end table, etc.).

My initial thought was to have half of it cut to 8/4 and the other half 5/4.
If it was your decision how would you have it milled?
Thanks.
Greg


18 replies so far

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1821 days


#1 posted 09-22-2014 05:28 PM

4/4

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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Don W

17958 posts in 2028 days


#2 posted 09-22-2014 05:36 PM

How big is the log?

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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gts78

12 posts in 819 days


#3 posted 09-22-2014 06:34 PM

Duh, forgot to say how big the log is. It is just about 14’ long and 15 or 16” in diameter

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1947 days


#4 posted 09-22-2014 06:43 PM

Is that 16” with bark or without? That could make a difference as small as it is.

I would make two 7’ logs, cut one into as thick a slabs as possible and turn the other one into 5/4 slabs.

Remember, you really don’t want to use the core so if you slab it all the way you’ll probably have a couple of slabs that need to have the core cut out of or you’ll see severe cracking that can travel all the way across the good wood to the edge.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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Don W

17958 posts in 2028 days


#5 posted 09-22-2014 06:43 PM

I’d tell the sawyer to cut it for the most optimal cuts, with your initial thoughts in mind.

Another thing to think about is saving some live edge if you’d want it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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pmayer

864 posts in 2526 days


#6 posted 09-23-2014 12:26 AM

I’d probably go 80% 4/4, and 20% 8/4, +/-.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2150 days


#7 posted 09-23-2014 01:18 AM



I d probably go 80% 4/4, and 20% 8/4, +/-.

- pmayer

I second that motion.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1571 posts in 1936 days


#8 posted 09-23-2014 01:20 AM

A couple of 8/4 boards for table legs. The rest 4/4. Like Dallas said, the pith core will crack and split.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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gts78

12 posts in 819 days


#9 posted 09-23-2014 01:43 AM

Thanks, all.

Dallas, making two 7’ logs is the first thing I was planning on doing.

The 16” is including the bark, I believe.

Even if it only ends up being 12”-14” diameter without the bark I can’t really complain. It is free lumber. This will also be my first experience having a log milled so at the very least it will be a good learning experience for me.

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1008 days


#10 posted 09-24-2014 02:50 AM

Try to get the log sawn while you are at the mill. It is a fun experience.

-- Jim from Kansas

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3018 posts in 1258 days


#11 posted 09-24-2014 02:54 AM

If, like most of us, you use 3/4” wood primarily, then go 4/4. If you like to use 1” thick a fair amount, you might do 5/4. OF course, you’ll get more 4/4 planks than 5/4. I kind of like 5/4 because I try not to always use 3/4”.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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nicksmurf111

361 posts in 911 days


#12 posted 09-24-2014 03:16 AM

Hopefully they don’t charge you an extra fee for a small job. I know one of the larger mills around here does, but I found a relative of an acquaintance who had a mill that gave me a good price to cut some cherry up last year (plane sawn on a circle mill). I just let my 4/4 stock air dry for a year in the back of my garage. Some of the boards are really hard to joint and plane at 4/4 to get 3/4 boards and I wish they were a little thicker.

Maybe you can let them sit a few weeks, while you try to acquire another tree, and take more than one? Just an idea.

Also, before you cut them to 7’ ask them how far apart the dogs are on their mill.

-- Nicholas

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gts78

12 posts in 819 days


#13 posted 09-24-2014 03:54 AM

Charles, I am pretty much a new woodworker so I haven’t really developed a preference for one thickness over another. At this point I’m leaning towards going with two slabs of 8/4 and the rest 4/4. I plan on talking to the sawyer first though once he sees the log to see what he suggests to make the most of the log.
Nicholas, I asked if they have a minimum and told them how big the log is. They said they do not have a minimum and quoted me $0.28/ bd.ft to cut it.

I am taking it to the mill tomorrow if all goes well. I am hoping they can cut it while I am there. Should be fun.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1571 posts in 1936 days


#14 posted 09-24-2014 11:44 AM

Commercial hardwood is typically rough sawn at 1 1/8” thick for 4/4 lumber. Be sure that the sawyer adds the extra 1/8”. Makes a big difference when planing to 3/4” finished thickness. 8/4 would be 2 1/8” thick.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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CharlesA

3018 posts in 1258 days


#15 posted 09-24-2014 11:52 AM

Local sawmills around here for 4/4 is pretty close to 1”.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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