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Full or thin kerf

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Forum topic by joshuam39 posted 09-22-2014 05:06 AM 1377 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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joshuam39

62 posts in 848 days


09-22-2014 05:06 AM

I was going to get a Freud Premiere Fusion blade for my Bosch 4100 table saw. I am not sure if I should get a full or thin kerf blade. I understand the thin is better for weaker powered saws. Is the Bosch powerful enough to handle the full kerf? Is there any other advantages of the thin kerf? I was leaning toward the full kerf.

-- Let's go Pens!


26 replies so far

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wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#1 posted 09-22-2014 05:48 AM

I have the 4100 and use the Thin Kerf and can’t be more happy with it. A truly well made and efficient blade. Put a Thousand BF through it and it keeps going. Barley need to clean it, it still puts a nice smooth cut edge on. . I don’t have the Full Kerf so I can’t say much about it.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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splatman

563 posts in 865 days


#2 posted 09-22-2014 06:00 AM

Thin kerf = Less wood turned into sawdust.

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2842 days


#3 posted 09-22-2014 09:31 AM

A full kerf blade tends to be more stable, but is 33% wider than a TK, and requires proportionately more effort from the motor. Thin kerf is easier on the motor, so should help with longevity. TK also consumes less wood, makes less noise, and makes less saw dust (as mentioned). Either will work, but I’d lean toward the TK for the sake of the motor.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1187 days


#4 posted 09-22-2014 11:47 AM

For a portable saw, I’d lean toward a thin kerf. Any portable saw will handle a sharp full kerf blade, but as mentioned you’re turning more wood into dust and your feed speed is going to be proportionately reduced. A good thin kerf blade has few drawbacks, the main one being reduced ability to shave a little off one dimension without the blade being fully engaged in the wood as it will tend to flex as it takes the path of least resistance. I use a 50T full kerf on my 3hp cabinet saw 99% of the time. The only reason for me to switch is when I’m doing several thin pieces where the wood savings begins to really ad up, or when making many cuts in something particularly expensive.

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paxorion

1102 posts in 1512 days


#5 posted 09-22-2014 01:13 PM

I put a TK blade into my Dewalt saw to ensure that it doesn’t affect the riving knife’s ability to operate. I believe all job site saws that meet the splitter/riving knife regulations are spec’d to support a certain range of thin kerf blades (3/32”/0.94” thick w/ a ~0.71” plate thickness). I actually shyed away from the Freud Premier Fusion TK because the kerf thickness (0.91”) was too close to my Dewalt’s riving knife.

-- paxorion

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timbertailor

1592 posts in 890 days


#6 posted 09-22-2014 02:06 PM

The Thin Kerf Premium Fusion Freud Combination blade is all I use any more.

Great blades at a great price.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#7 posted 09-22-2014 03:45 PM

I would recommend a thin kerf on a portable saw like that
unless all you want to cut is 4/4 stock in which
case a full kerf is probably fine. You can get blade
stabilizers that help cut quality a bit by suppressing
vibration. I used them with thin kerf blades for
several years before I got my first cabinet saw
and started using full kerf blades for everything.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1913 days


#8 posted 09-22-2014 03:54 PM

I think some day in the future you should try a full kerf blade just to see how it cuts and how your table handles the extra weight,you will never know for sure if you like it unless you try it.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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Rick Dennington

5182 posts in 2660 days


#9 posted 09-22-2014 04:13 PM

I’ve got about 10 blades, both tk and wf…... I run all of mine on a 5 horse saw,and a 3 hp saw, so I really can’t justify an answer here, other than to say that you might want to try both at some point…Could be that you might update to a bigger saw, and then you’d have both to try….........!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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joshuam39

62 posts in 848 days


#10 posted 09-22-2014 05:43 PM

Seems everyone is in favor of the thin kerf. I figured a full kerf would be more durable and give more consistent cuts. But, perhaps in light of the fact that I am using a portable saw, the thin would be better. A cabinet saw is on my wishlist, but I won’t be getting one any time soon.

-- Let's go Pens!

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2548 days


#11 posted 09-22-2014 06:49 PM

I have been using Freud’s thin kerf blades in my table saw for 6 or more years. I love them. You can feel the difference between the full and thin kerf. The thin lets you cut the thin stuff a little quicker and cut thicker harder woods than you could otherwise.

-- Chris K

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1913 days


#12 posted 09-22-2014 06:57 PM

The only way I could have cut a slab of 2” by 20” Ash on my table saw(with relative ease) was to use a full kerf Freud LM72 blade.
My table saw has a 1 hp motor.tried the tk blade and it burnt the wood ,almost damaged/warped the blade.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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joshuam39

62 posts in 848 days


#13 posted 09-22-2014 07:13 PM

How many HP is a 15 amp motor anyway? I’ve never seen a clear answer for this.

-- Let's go Pens!

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2842 days


#14 posted 09-22-2014 09:18 PM


How many HP is a 15 amp motor anyway? I ve never seen a clear answer for this.

- joshuam39

It can vary depending on the parameters of the particular motor, but 15 amps @ 120v is generally roughly 1-1/2 realistic usable horsepower. You might see peaks of 2hp or greater for extremely short bursts, but claims of significantly more than that are very misleading.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2842 days


#15 posted 09-22-2014 09:26 PM


The only way I could have cut a slab of 2” by 20” Ash on my table saw(with relative ease) was to use a full kerf Freud LM72 blade.
My table saw has a 1 hp motor.tried the tk blade and it burnt the wood ,almost damaged/warped the blade.

- distrbd

Something else was wrong with that particular TK blade or something else in the equation was amiss (dull blade, dirty blade, warped, bent, wrong tooth configuration, poor fence alignment, etc). The fact the blade is 25% thinner won’t be the cause of burning.

I’ve ripped upwards of 3” on several occasions on multiple saws using several different TK blades without a problem, and have read of several others doing it also. I bought an LM72 at Freud’s recommendation for my contractor saw, and it labored the motor quite a bit. The TK version of the same blade, the LU87 ripped much more effortlessly on the same saw.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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