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Forum topic by Aubster posted 07-08-2007 07:10 PM 1199 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Aubster

132 posts in 4114 days


07-08-2007 07:10 PM

Topic tags/keywords: material

This question is more for my wife than for me. My wife is a mixed media artist and wants to know what would be the best way hold a sheet of aluminum to wood without using screws or nails? I work mostly wood and have no idea if gluing it would work and if so what kind works best. This would be a good thing for me to know, because my wife has been getting more involved in my woodworking and I am predicting more than just wood in my future.

Thanks

-- A man who moves mountains starts one stone at a time.


12 replies so far

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

695 posts in 4177 days


#1 posted 07-08-2007 07:55 PM

If you’re looking for a permanent bond, contact cement, or epoxy.

Short term, double stick tape, or hot melt glue.

-- Nicky

View Karson's profile

Karson

35128 posts in 4486 days


#2 posted 07-08-2007 08:21 PM

Yes I think that the metal counter tops that are applied to wood substrate use counter contact cement.

You might want to roughen up the back with some light sanding to remove some of the oxidation just before gluing it down.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Aubster's profile

Aubster

132 posts in 4114 days


#3 posted 07-09-2007 07:30 AM

Thanks for the info.

-- A man who moves mountains starts one stone at a time.

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 4082 days


#4 posted 07-09-2007 09:26 AM

Not a polyurethane glue user, but I think that in addition to what Nicky and Karson suggested, a glue such as Gorilla Glue would work -

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4024 posts in 4149 days


#5 posted 07-09-2007 11:01 AM

I use the Polyurethane, I think it would work. Something like Hansen’s Liquid Nails – construction adhesive would work too. No matter what you use, be sure and do a mock-up, rather than launching ahead with your priceless art piece that you worked on for six months. It’s akin to the finishing world. You would never experiment with a new finish, or process directly on your grand piano. Look at the Big Dig in Boston. Ya never know what will happen over time.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View furnitologist's profile

furnitologist

198 posts in 4098 days


#6 posted 07-11-2007 04:07 AM

Hey Aubster:

Contact cement …......give the back a real good scuff as Karson suggests, but a good scuff, a used 80 grit sanding belt works great, go in circular motion.

Cut the piece oversize, so you can trim off any crimping that may occur when cutting the metal.

Very important, make sure there is absolutely no debree between teh substrate and the metal, it will show through like a cherry on a cream pie.

Neil

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 4412 days


#7 posted 07-11-2007 05:39 AM

I’d first go with liquid nails, but any of the above suggestions should work. Take a look in the adhesives aisle at the Big Orange (or blue) box. and read the labels. There is a different brand at Lowes that claims to be stonger than Liquid Nails (and warns you to use less that you’d normally)

You might find a better assortment of epoxies at a smaller hardware store, Another avenue to try, if you have them in your neck of the woods, a boat/marine place. I’ve used a marine grade sealant 3M Brand 4200 (I think) to attach my kitchen sink in an “undermount” procedure I saw in Workbench a few years back. This is the stuff that will pull the fiberglass off the boat before it’ll break the bond. I’ve basically guaranteed the next homeowner will have to get out a sledgehammer and destroy some granite tile if they ever want to change out the sink.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Aubster's profile

Aubster

132 posts in 4114 days


#8 posted 07-11-2007 06:21 AM

Thanks everyone,

I am getting information than I ever expected. You guys and gals are great. I’m going to research how to do a blog on this site so I can show you what we are doing. I think with all the great info everyone is giving me you deserve that much.

Thanks again

-- A man who moves mountains starts one stone at a time.

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 4082 days


#9 posted 07-11-2007 07:22 AM

The blog would be great…the only trick is that you have upload your pics to one of the many sites that you can store/manage/share pics on. If you click on the “pictures & video friendly” text above the “Reply to this topic” window (the window that you would respond in), there is a link to the “Embedding Pictures” guide (this applies to blogs too).

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

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Dorje

1763 posts in 4082 days


#10 posted 07-11-2007 07:23 AM

Wait – duh – this is even easier! CLICK HERE

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Aubster's profile

Aubster

132 posts in 4114 days


#11 posted 07-11-2007 07:32 AM

Thanks Dorje, I just found that too. I will start the blog this weekend.

-- A man who moves mountains starts one stone at a time.

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 4082 days


#12 posted 07-11-2007 07:42 AM

Sounds great!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

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