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Making a steady rest

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Forum topic by dfox52 posted 09-21-2014 01:34 PM 2716 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dfox52

21 posts in 1153 days


09-21-2014 01:34 PM

I want to make a steady rest for my new Jet 1221 incorporating some of the ideas I’ve seen here. But I’ve never had the opportunity to examine one close up. I’m not sure what type of wheel/rollers would work best (soft rubber, hard nylon, small wheels, larger wheels, etc…) What do folks think about using these wheels I found on Amazon? http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002Q111Z4/ref=gno_cart_title_0?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A43UOEJF6Z1TG#productDetails


20 replies so far

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3122 days


#1 posted 09-21-2014 01:45 PM

I would go with skateboard wheels … the harder the better. These are 99a in hardness:
http://www.amazon.com/Choice-Skateboard-99a-Wheels-Black/dp/B004UOL290/ref=sr_1_6?s=action-sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1411306882&sr=1-6

I started out with roller blade wheels … too soft, so I ordered hard skateboard wheels instead.
Click for details

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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dfox52

21 posts in 1153 days


#2 posted 09-21-2014 02:10 PM


I would go with skateboard wheels … the harder the better. These are 99a in hardness:
http://www.amazon.com/Choice-Skateboard-99a-Wheels-Black/dp/B004UOL290/ref=sr_1_6?s=action-sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1411306882&sr=1-6

I started out with roller blade wheels … too soft, so I ordered hard skateboard wheels instead.
Click for details

- TheDane

Thanks… Looking at those pics, I’m guessing I would use a flat head machine screw for an “axle?” What size would you recommend? 50MM?

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Nubsnstubs

825 posts in 1189 days


#3 posted 09-21-2014 03:39 PM

Wow, that’s pretty hard, but I’m still learning. Right now I’m using 3” wheels at 70A. I had 80A, but with the types of woods I use, I felt that was too hard.
As far as the axle bolts, it all depends on the bearing ID. I’m using 5/16” x 1 1/2 button head allen socket bolts. For my tool, I have to grind off 1/8” as I can’t get 1 3/8” bolts in that configuration…... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3122 days


#4 posted 09-21-2014 04:31 PM

Thanks… Looking at those pics, I m guessing I would use a flat head machine screw for an “axle?” What size would you recommend? 50MM?

I used 2 inch long 5/16” hex bolts for axles. As far as the wheel size, I think the smaller the better (50mm is just under 2 inches). Smaller wheels allow you to turn smaller diameter workpieces. The inline skate wheels in the project photos I posted are 70mm (2 3/4”) so the smallest diameter object I can turn is about 30mm (1 1/4”).

If you are interested, here is the plan I used for mine:
http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/Uploads/Public/Documents/Issue305/WJ133%20Lathe%20Steady%20Rest.pdf

I am considering building a 3-wheel steady. The 4-wheel steadies provide more support, but the 3-wheel versions allow you turn smaller diameter objects.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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dfox52

21 posts in 1153 days


#5 posted 09-21-2014 04:37 PM



If you are interested, here is the plan I used for mine:
http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/Uploads/Public/Documents/Issue305/WJ133%20Lathe%20Steady%20Rest.pdf- TheDane

Thanks!

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3044 days


#6 posted 09-21-2014 08:06 PM

D Fox I think those shower curtain wheels are too small and also I would say get the ones complete with bearings inbuilt.On the other hand I do not see why you need wheels in front of the spindle you are turning as you apply pressure when turning a spindle the problem is that the spindle bends towards the back of the bed away from you , not towards you so why do you need two wheels in front? A simple set up with two wheels set behind the work spindle piece as it has pressure applied to it from the front to the rear would be fine IMHO and you should not need anything for the cut being made internally as shown on the four wheeled version with the chuck held piece being hollowed.IMHO of course. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3122 days


#7 posted 09-21-2014 10:30 PM

... I do not see why you need wheels in front of the spindle you are turning …

You don’t for spindles … there are several variations of steady rests that only have two wheels. The 3 or 4 wheel versions are useful when you are working on bowls and vessels in that the wheels tend to dampen vibration. Yesterday I was working on cherry bowl with thin walls and had trouble with vibration and tear-out. I mounted the steady-rest on the lathe, set the wheels against the outside rim of the bowl, and presto … no more vibration and nice smooth cuts.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Rick M

7901 posts in 1839 days


#8 posted 09-24-2014 05:24 AM

I haven’t read about the difference wheel hardness makes. Is it a matter of reducing friction or vibration?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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hairy

2384 posts in 2991 days


#9 posted 09-24-2014 12:09 PM

I used inline skatewheels on this. Off the shelf hardware and plywood. It’s not for bowls. I use it on hollow forms and spindles bigger than this one I bought.

I changed the wheels on the one I bought. I put inline skate wheels on.

If I was to buy a steady rest for bowls, it would be this one.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3122 days


#10 posted 09-24-2014 01:44 PM

hairy—I am envious! Is that a Sweet 16?

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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hairy

2384 posts in 2991 days


#11 posted 09-24-2014 01:57 PM

It is. I got it 4 years ago. It is real sweet!

-- stay thirsty my friends...

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3122 days


#12 posted 09-24-2014 02:53 PM

hairy—When I bought my Delta midi 3 years ago, I decided I would upgrade when Delta’s 5 year warranty expired so sometime between now and then, I hope to be making a trip down to Barneveld WI to pick up my new forever lathe!

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Nubsnstubs

825 posts in 1189 days


#13 posted 09-24-2014 04:00 PM


I haven t read about the difference wheel hardness makes. Is it a matter of reducing friction or vibration?

- Rick M.

Rick, I would suppose there is a big difference in wheel hardness if you are turning wood that has a lot of voids.

The steady I invented is used for removing tenons. Most of the wood I turn has voids, like Mesquite, Catclaw, Mountain oak, and generally wood that would be better suited for the fireplace. I’ve lost a couple pieces because when the wheels hit or goes into a void, there is a lot of shock delivered to the form, which I think helps the wood crack more along the already existing cracks and voids. If the wheels are softer, the shock isn’t as bad as the harder wheels. When the wheels hit a void, it sounds just like a truck on the freeway with a flat tire on it’s trailer. The higher the rpm, the more aggrevating the sound.
The wheel hardness is called “Durometer” indicated by the letter “A” after a number. The higher the number, the harder the wheel. 40A is a lot softer than 80A.. ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Kenbu

29 posts in 1340 days


#14 posted 11-01-2014 04:59 PM

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3122 days


#15 posted 11-01-2014 05:43 PM

Too bad. WJ link is dead already.

Here’s a link to the plan, but it is no longer free: http://www.rockler.com/lathe-steady-rest-plan

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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