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How do you treat punky wood?

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Forum topic by DocSavage45 posted 09-16-2014 11:34 PM 1369 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2306 days


09-16-2014 11:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question finishing refurbishing old wood

Hey Lj’s,

I’m focusing on rehabbing my upstairs windows. It’s been off a two story ladder. Not fun. Now I’m on the porch roof and I’m rebuilding/rehabbing a major screw up. ( Not mine…LOL!)

I’m leaving the inside alone but closing off and insulating the outside, with a new double glazed window, framing and insulation.

My question is: Some of the old wood is a little punky after I removed 40 years of paint. The old sill is just above the porch roof. It’s staying but needs some treating to take it beyond my lifetime. LOL! No rot but it’s old. I was going to use linseed oil and mineral spirits, but Googling has suggested problems in drying times and future complications as I will be painting over it.

I just found two different products that are proposed to fix this situation

1. Minwax High Performance wood Hardener
2. PC Petrifier Water Based Wood Hardener.

Looking for your experience and ways you LJ’s might have tackled this?

Thanks!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher


6 replies so far

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longgone

5688 posts in 2772 days


#1 posted 09-17-2014 12:19 AM

hey Doc…Years ago I had a house with some rotted window sills and I dug out the rotted wood, treated it with copper naphtha and filled it in with bondo… It remained in excellent condition for the 9 or 10 years that I still owned it prior to selling the house..

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shipwright

7170 posts in 2262 days


#2 posted 09-17-2014 12:27 AM

Look into S1 sealer.
I’ve used it for years and it is amazing stuff….... if the wood is dry. It is so thin it will go about anywhere diesel will go. Then, when the solvents evaporate the epoxy hardens and leaves stiffened fibres that are sealed from both moisture and air.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#3 posted 09-17-2014 12:31 AM

Git Rot is another water-thin epoxy product that works quite well in a situation like yours.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2306 days


#4 posted 09-17-2014 12:56 AM

Greg,

Thanks, no rot just old and much of the legume has dried out. Have done the bondo trick in past. Didn’t do well as a top coat filler last year.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2306 days


#5 posted 09-17-2014 12:58 AM

Paul ,

Thanks, I did check it out. Might use that as a fix for a number of exposed stuff. Much appreciated! :<)

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2306 days


#6 posted 09-17-2014 01:03 AM

runswithscissors,

Just checked that out and it is another possibility! Thanks!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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