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Forum topic by UGAfan21 posted 09-16-2014 03:14 AM 2314 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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UGAfan21

60 posts in 823 days


09-16-2014 03:14 AM

Just ordered a set of pipe clamps. What is everyone’s opinion on the type of pipe I should get? Black, galvanized, etc?

-- GO DAWGS!!! SIC'EM


35 replies so far

View abmorse1's profile

abmorse1

16 posts in 1149 days


#1 posted 09-16-2014 03:27 AM

I’m interested in this too.
Where did you order them from?
Thanks,
Aaron

-- Aaron, Tulsa OK

View endgrainy's profile

endgrainy

237 posts in 1353 days


#2 posted 09-16-2014 03:42 AM

I just use 3/4” black iron pipe that I bought at Lowes and cut into the sizes I needed. The upside of pipe clamps is they’re super strong (sometimes too strong) and won’t flex.

The downside of the black pipe is that it can “rub off” onto wood resting on the pipe during glue ups. I’ve taken to coating the pipe in painters tape to avoid this.

-- Follow me on Instagram @endgrainy

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#3 posted 09-16-2014 03:46 AM

Black pipe is the way to go ,in time the galvanized peals off of pipe clamps.Also 3/4 ” pipe is much better than 1/2”it flexes a lot less than 1/2”. When you get the pipes make sure you get both ends of the pipe threaded so you can join more than one pipe together with pipe couplers. Another point get some pipes that are 3” or so, longer than sizes used mostly ,as an example ,instead of getting 24”pipes get 27 ” so that you can easily clamp 24” projects.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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UGAfan21

60 posts in 823 days


#4 posted 09-16-2014 03:53 AM

Amazon… Got 12 sets for $97.00 3/4 … Great deal read reviews and there were a couple bad ones but for the most part they were a success

-- GO DAWGS!!! SIC'EM

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UGAfan21

60 posts in 823 days


#5 posted 09-16-2014 03:55 AM

Thanks guys… How inconvenient is the black rubbing off onto your wood? Easy fix?

-- GO DAWGS!!! SIC'EM

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#6 posted 09-16-2014 04:00 AM



Thanks guys… How inconvenient is the black rubbing off onto your wood? Easy fix?

- UGAfan21

The last black pipes I got for pipe clamps I washed the black off with gasoline. It’s kind of time consuming but the black coating is gone and the pipes are clean.

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

737 posts in 2052 days


#7 posted 09-16-2014 04:02 AM

I am going with the 3/4 black pipe. My son in law is running a gas line for my garage and there will be 40’ of pipe left for clamps. You can’t beat free pipe. I have used regular bar clamps and pipe clamps work just as good. Go with the black pipe my old ones have been in my shop for 35years and still work great.

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endgrainy

237 posts in 1353 days


#8 posted 09-16-2014 04:03 AM

The black sands off pretty easily. It bothers me most when glue squeeze out seems to get stuck between the pipe clamp and the wood, leaving behind a hardened black glue glob that you can’t easily scrape off without removing the clamps during that “skinning over” phase… hence the tape.

-- Follow me on Instagram @endgrainy

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#9 posted 09-16-2014 04:05 AM

Endgrainy makes a good point about leaving marks on your wood with black pipes but Galvy pipes leave marks also.
I always slip my fingers under pipe clamps so they are not in contact with the wood to prevent this problem.

Harbor Freight has sales on pipe clamps sometimes , where you can get 3 of them for the cost of a brand name pipe clamps. Some times HF clamps are not good or need a little Vaseline on the threads to have them work well,but for the most part the biggest percentage of them work fine. The ones that don’t work well they will take back.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View NoThanks's profile

NoThanks

798 posts in 994 days


#10 posted 09-16-2014 04:18 AM



Endgrainy makes a good point about leaving marks on your wood with black pipes but Galvy pipes leave marks also.
I always slip my fingers under pipe clamps so they are not in contact with the wood to prevent this problem.

- a1Jim

But what do you do if you have more than 10 clamps?? :)

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#11 posted 09-16-2014 04:23 AM

I usually put one clamp on at a time(I think most of us do) it takes two seconds to slip your finger under each end as you tighten them
2 seconds X 10 clamps = 20 seconds extra :)

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Bobin29's profile

Bobin29

12 posts in 2250 days


#12 posted 09-16-2014 05:26 AM

Get a roll of cut rite wax paper and tear a strip about four inches wide, crease it down the center and lay it on the pipe clamp and then put your wood on and clamp it. Also, put a strip in top. The wax paper keeps the wood and any dripping glue from touching the pipe clamps and thus the stain is prevented. I use wax paper between wood and a caul too. It keeps the caul from inadvertently getting glued to the wood.

View pauljuilleret's profile

pauljuilleret

71 posts in 1117 days


#13 posted 09-16-2014 10:45 AM

As Bobin 29 said in my shop you will always find a roll of wax paper just for when I do glue ups works great plus when you are done I keep some handy to use to wipe down my miter slots in the table saw makes things slide so much easier especially my cross cut sled that has wooden runners

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1510 days


#14 posted 09-16-2014 03:43 PM


I just use 3/4” black iron pipe that I bought at Lowes and cut into the sizes I needed. The upside of pipe clamps is they re super strong (sometimes too strong) and won t flex.

The downside of the black pipe is that it can “rub off” onto wood resting on the pipe during glue ups. I ve taken to coating the pipe in painters tape to avoid this.

- endgrainy

I second getting long lengths of black iron pipe for your clamps.


Black pipe is the way to go ,in time the galvanized peals off of pipe clamps.Also 3/4 ” pipe is much better than 1/2”it flexes a lot less than 1/2”. When you get the pipes make sure you get both ends of the pipe threaded so you can join more than one pipe together with pipe couplers. Another point get some pipes that are 3” or so, longer than sizes used mostly ,as an example ,instead of getting 24”pipes get 27 ” so that you can easily clamp 24” projects.

- a1Jim

Definitely get it cut to longer lengths and threaded on both sides for more flexibility.

I’ve been toying with the idea of cutting PVC pipe spacers to insert into my pipe clamps to help with glue spacing. Haven’t had a chance (or motivation) to do it yet. It’s too easy to steal my wife’s wax paper. (And stocking up on parallel clamps this past year doesn’t help either. But that’s another story…)

-- paxorion

View abmorse1's profile

abmorse1

16 posts in 1149 days


#15 posted 09-16-2014 04:09 PM

Wow, that looks like a great deal. Even cheaper than HF. I might have to give these a try too.
Thanks,
Aaron

-- Aaron, Tulsa OK

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