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Forum topic by Steve posted 09-16-2014 02:19 AM 1223 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Steve

164 posts in 1459 days


09-16-2014 02:19 AM

Well its been a while since I posted but I am in the market for a few more large stationary tools, namely a 8” jointer and a 3/4” or 1 1/4” shaper. Most of my tools are General and General international, which are readily available to me. What I am wondering is what the quality of Powermatic or Delta products is, and the places to purchase these tools in Western Canada, B.C. or Alberta. I feel a 8” jointer would be adequate of course knowing bigger is sometimes better. I will be using the shaper for raised panel doors and feel a 3hp. would be adequate, but would a 3/4” or 1 1/4” with power feed be better.


22 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8294 posts in 3107 days


#1 posted 09-16-2014 02:23 AM

You might look at cutter costs and diameters. You’ll
find you can get deeper profiles in larger bore cutters.

View Rick Bailey's profile

Rick Bailey

247 posts in 821 days


#2 posted 09-16-2014 02:49 AM

If you decide to go with a sharper and make doors try to get a sharper with a power feed.

I have made thousands of doors in my life and RP doors can be very scarey if you have never done them before.

Even with a power feed, if you don’t have it lock down tight it will move.

I don’t mean to scare you but I have seen it all.

Start slow and be safe, maybe a 1 1/2 HP to start with.
Best,
Rick

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1007 days


#3 posted 09-16-2014 03:01 AM

Grizzly will be having their Christmas sale before long, and also read on this forum about some 10% off coupons, I have the 3hp shaper and G0609 jointer, and the 1hp power feeder. Hard to beat Grizzly for prices and same quality as the other imported machines. They also have good customer service. A neighbor has the 1/2 hp power feeder and he says it is plenty big. But it is only a little less than the 1hp.

-- Jim from Kansas

View Andre's profile

Andre

1016 posts in 1265 days


#4 posted 09-16-2014 05:17 AM

”:http://www.grizzly.com/products/1-1-2-HP-Shaper/G1035” Just picked up this unit from Grizzly and so far no complaints . I intend to use it mostly as a stationary router so was not to concerned about the power, but I did pick up a 3.5” shaper head a it cut through pine no problem at all. I did not want to go the 220v path so this shaper worked out fine.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View unbob's profile

unbob

718 posts in 1363 days


#5 posted 09-16-2014 05:01 PM

I have only been using shapers for the last couple of years, some observations.
It takes a lot of power to run cutters that have a lot of wood engagement. I have not used raised panel cutters, but they do appear to have a lot of engagement.
I am on my fourth shaper, this one is 5hp with 1 1/4” spindle. The smaller cutters for 1 1/4” spindles are 3 1/2” diameter.
From my limited experience, 5hp seems minimum to me for the larger bore and diameter cutters. Its not very hard to bog down a 5hp shaper.

Fences, most are terrible on Asian imports, and even worse on many older shapers.

View Rick Bailey's profile

Rick Bailey

247 posts in 821 days


#6 posted 09-16-2014 05:57 PM


I have only been using shapers for the last couple of years, some observations. It takes a lot of power to run cutters that have a lot of wood engagement. I have not used raised panel cutters, but they do appear to have a lot of engagement. I am on my fourth shaper, this one is 5hp with 1 1/4” spindle. The smaller cutters for 1 1/4” spindles are 3 1/2” diameter. From my limited experience, 5hp seems minimum to me for the larger bore and diameter cutters. Its not very hard to bog down a 5hp shaper. Fences, most are terrible on Asian imports, and even worse on many older shapers.

- unbob

unbob,

That interesting,
I have a 3HP Griz and have run 4 1/2’’ RP knifes on it without it bogging down.
I do two passes though.
What brand is your shaper?

I agree on the Asian fences.

Best,
Rick

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

View unbob's profile

unbob

718 posts in 1363 days


#7 posted 09-16-2014 07:11 PM

Of course, being new to shapers, and not having anyone with experience to guide me, I have overloaded the machines at times.
The shaper I currently have is an ex Boeing machine-Shoda, made in Japan probably from the 1970s.
I mostly use it for glue joints. The machine weighs 1800lbs with the table extensions. It leaves a nice cut finish.

View Rick Bailey's profile

Rick Bailey

247 posts in 821 days


#8 posted 09-16-2014 07:24 PM

1800lbs?
I like the sound of that.
I don’t think I ever heard of that brand.
You get a cleaner cut doing a multiple passes with the larger profiles.
Snap a shot if you get the chance of that Big Dog I love to see it.
Best,
Rick

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

View unbob's profile

unbob

718 posts in 1363 days


#9 posted 09-16-2014 11:47 PM

This is the cl photo, looks smaller than it is, the table with wings is 60” across.
I have only had this one running for a short time, I am getting used to how much of a bite to take, and how much to leave for the last cut in various materials, with various cutters. I am working with lock miter cutters right now, may be the hardest ones to get right.

View Rick Bailey's profile

Rick Bailey

247 posts in 821 days


#10 posted 09-17-2014 12:08 AM

Wow what a beast, that 60’’ table would awesome for running profiles on large parts.
Question, is using belts or bands on the motor to spindle?
Thanks for sharing.
Rick

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2561 posts in 1716 days


#11 posted 09-17-2014 12:11 AM

Welcon, I don’t know how many raised panel doors you intend to make, but I think of shapers as being almost industrial machines. I have made small runs of raised panel doors (6) using a 3” router bit with a Freud 3hp router in a home made router table. I made multiple cuts raising the bit about 1/8” at a time and they came out fine. However, if you really want a shaper, my buddy that is a full time woodworker/cabinet maker has an older 3/4” spindle Grizzly with a 3hp motor (IIRC) and a 1 hp power feeder. He does just fine with it. Be aware that the cutters are expensive.

IMO the older Powermatic and Delta tools were good quality and would last you a lifetime. I don’t think that is the case any longer. You might watch Kijiji.ca if you aren’t in a great hurry. Here is one example. Also, Grizzly is located in Bellingham, WA as was mentioned. I have found their tools to be a good value. HTH

-- Art

View Rick Bailey's profile

Rick Bailey

247 posts in 821 days


#12 posted 09-17-2014 12:23 AM



Welcon, I don t know how many raised panel doors you intend to make, but I think of shapers as being almost industrial machines. I have made small runs of raised panel doors (6) using a 3” router bit with a Freud 3hp router in a home made router table. I made multiple cuts raising the bit about 1/8” at a time and they came out fine. However, if you really want a shaper, my buddy that is a full time woodworker/cabinet maker has an older 3/4” spindle Grizzly with a 3hp motor (IIRC) and a 1 hp power feeder. He does just fine with it. Be aware that the cutters are expensive.

IMO the older Powermatic and Delta tools were good quality and would last you a lifetime. I don t think that is the case any longer. You might watch Kijiji.ca if you aren t in a great hurry. Here is one example. Also, Grizzly is located in Bellingham, WA as was mentioned. I have found their tools to be a good value. HTH

- AandCstyle


Hi Art
That’s the shaper I have, it has 3 spindles 1/2 -3/4 and 1’’ its been a real workhorse for me for years.

We have a PM at work looks just like my Griz, the belt broke one day and was going to take three days to get one from NAPA. I got home that night and pull mine off took it to work slapped on the PM fit per fit.
The tooling will make your wallet scream.

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

View unbob's profile

unbob

718 posts in 1363 days


#13 posted 09-17-2014 12:37 AM

A little different construction on this shaper, photo shows it without table. The spindle unit being more forward makes the table far forward. There is a 300lb cast iron rear motor cover to counter balance the machine.
The belts on it are Fenner link belts that came on it. I bought new V belts, but put the link belts back on because they run smoother. No slipping or stretch problems.
The spindle is solid “not changeable” 1 1/4”, has the benefit of zero run-out. the spindle has to have zero run-out for the overhead bearing support.
The spindle holds a quart of oil!
The table is easy to tram true to the spindle on this style of machine.

View Rick Bailey's profile

Rick Bailey

247 posts in 821 days


#14 posted 09-17-2014 12:47 AM

Hm,
I’ve never used a link belt on a shaper before so I can’t comment.
Have you check for a voltage drop?
A 5hp should rip things out of your hands before it bogs down.

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

View unbob's profile

unbob

718 posts in 1363 days


#15 posted 09-17-2014 01:34 AM

I have not much experience with link belts either. These have been on the machine for some time and equalized themselves. So far, working well for me.
I don’t have a motor problem, more of a me problem trying to take too much of a cut.
The lock miter cutter I am using now is the Grizzly 1 1/4” bore 4 1/8” diameter. To make the joint in one cut on 3/4” maple, the board is cut back about 3/4”. This one is a double lock miter, with the shape of the cut zig sagging through the wood makes for considerable cutter contact. Better to do it in two cuts.
I have another cutter that is single lock miter-requires a second operation on a table saw. That cutter requires less HP, can do that one in one cut in maple.

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