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Forum topic by mahdee posted 09-14-2014 12:50 AM 2749 views 1 time favorited 179 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


09-14-2014 12:50 AM

Hi gals and guys.. I thought to start a forum for those who are into natural edge design furniture, bowls, boxes and so on. So, what draws you to create natural edge products and what your recipients think about your creations? It would be great if this could be a natural edge questions and answers forum for those who appreciate the art and are willing to share pictures and processes of how they achieved their goal(s).

-- earthartandfoods.com


179 replies so far

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1731 posts in 1434 days


#1 posted 09-14-2014 01:51 PM

I think what has been attracting me to the way it challenges you to work with something non symetrical. I like having to come up with ways to work with it, as opposed to cutting it off and going square. Really a new venture for me now but it’s fun

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View leafherder's profile

leafherder

897 posts in 1417 days


#2 posted 09-14-2014 01:56 PM

I like the rustic look that the natural edge provides. In the age of mass production, mass marketing, it is nice to see something that is obviously hand crafted.

-- Leafherder

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#3 posted 09-14-2014 02:32 PM

I’m no artist, but I like the fact that the design best natural edge pieces flows from the shape/texture/dimensions of the raw piece you start with.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#4 posted 09-14-2014 02:41 PM

The flip side is that if you have a design in mind, you have so search for the right piece to work—you can’t just glue up the dimension/look you want.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#5 posted 09-15-2014 12:40 AM

I have to agree with all of you..It would be next to impossible to reproduce the same natural edge design mainly because it is impossible to come up with the same natural edge wood. And yes, the difficulty to match all the irregular corners, joints; bringing the whole thing into a desirable piece of furniture requires a sort of imaginative artistic and eccentric way of thinking. Currently, I am working on a project that though it is not going to be a natural edge project, it will require natural edge wood. I will explain as what I mean about this later. I will try to post some picture of it as it comes along. In the meanwhile here is a picture of my first jewelry box. And again although it is not natural edge, it came from one, and the most difficult part of making this box was trying to keep the lid from warping on both ends.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#6 posted 09-16-2014 12:39 AM

So, I am thinking, does natural edge mean you have to show the bark or just that the project was made with natural edge selects??

Here is some pictures of what I am working on currently and hope to finish by late Fall:

So, I have this natural edge cherry that is about 3” thick.

As you can see, there are cracks on both ends of the board.

The best parts happen to be from 22” to 64” with no crack in it. The slab has left me with two ends that have some significant cracks that I have to do something else with… To me, the most expensive part of making a good natural edge furniture is utilizing the “waste”.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#7 posted 09-16-2014 12:40 AM

Bark is negotiable. I left it on a piece I did, but took it off a piece I did as a gift—it was a coffee table and I thought it might get knocked off over time.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#8 posted 09-16-2014 01:05 AM

Agree Charles, I don’t think the bark defines natural edge any more than the shape of the wood that is cut as “natural edge”. I mean not quarter saw, but made to one from a center piece of a very odd shaped lumber and so on.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1731 posts in 1434 days


#9 posted 09-16-2014 01:33 AM

I think it could be both the bark or just the natural curvature. It is something that demands you remember it as a tree, not just a piece of wood

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#10 posted 09-16-2014 01:35 AM

Totally agree Kaleb..

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22021 posts in 1802 days


#11 posted 09-16-2014 01:42 AM

I leave the bark on areas that are not contacted in normal use. Any place I think they will rub against it, I take it off.

I tell people that it’s not just intended to be rustic. Nakashima was not considered rustic. I certainly don’t consider myself in his category, but natural edge can be sophisticated as well.

Good forum.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#12 posted 09-16-2014 01:51 AM

Monte, he certainly was a master at blending something “rustic” into a modern, classic piece of art. I am not sure if it was the simplicity of his work or the complexity of it that fit into almost any environment??

-- earthartandfoods.com

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#13 posted 09-16-2014 01:53 AM

I agree, Monte. I like live edge—don’t like rustic.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#14 posted 09-16-2014 02:56 PM

So, the board is about 2-1/4” thick but it has a good 1/2” dip near the middle of it.

At this point I wish I had a 22” planer with the board being 19” wide, I am going to hand plane it flat; with this task, no need to join a health club to get a good workout.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1194 days


#15 posted 09-16-2014 03:27 PM

Well, since this post is in the Woodturning forum, and I have not seen a round object yet, I’ll post one or two pics… This is Tamarisk Burl, obviously natural edge, 5 1/4” tall and 6” OD. Dyed with Sherwin Willians custom dye, sanded back and stained with Sher. Wil. Chestnut stain. Wall thickness is about 7/16” thick as I was limited on access to make it thinner. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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