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Need to unhandle a tool

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Forum topic by Troy Cleckler posted 09-12-2014 11:06 AM 1018 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 836 days


09-12-2014 11:06 AM

I’m building an articulating hollow system and one of the tools that I can use is a Sorby swan neck scraper with a handle. I like the handle and want to try and salvage it to use latter if I need one. The ferrel has one dimple in it to hold it to the tenon. What’s the best way to get it off?
Also, the scraper is mounted on the underside, flat portion, of the tool. Can I grind a shoulder on the top side to accept a round carbide cutter? Just thinking this would give me three options for this tool, round scraper, 1/4 in scraper and round carbide cutter/scraper.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....


11 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#1 posted 09-12-2014 11:56 AM

You can probably file off the dimple to release the blade shaft. As for flattening the other side of the blade, the only concern would be, how much the strength of the tool will be compromised. The idea is a good one though.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


#2 posted 09-12-2014 01:00 PM

You could drill the dimple out, just don’t drill too far past the ferrel. When you go to reuse it, either get a new ferrel, dimple it again using a punch slightly larger than the drilled hole, or epoxy some brass rod through the drilled hole into the tenon and sand it flush with the ferrel. Or, just dimple it in a different location.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2384 posts in 2997 days


#3 posted 09-12-2014 01:05 PM

Leave the dimple and ferrule alone. Put the scraper blade in a vise, put the handle close to the vise,and pry it off. That’s how I removed my Sorby spindle roughing gouge when I made a new handle for it.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1195 days


#4 posted 09-12-2014 03:42 PM

I have one of those. If I want to remove the shaft, I can just point it downwards, and it’ll fall out. LOL. I live in the desert, and I guess the wood was still a little wet when the handle was made, so when it got to my place, it dried out and cracked. The tool is loose in the handle. I would recommend you copy the design of the handle from a local wood rather than try to save it.
The bar, shank or neck on mine is 1/2” OD, and where it’s flat, is .350” or between 5/16 and 3/8””. I think grinding a flat on the top to mount a carbide cutter would not leave enough threads to support the cutters you would be using. It would work for a time, but you will have a structural failure.
I would get a carbide cutter that is the same OD as the Sorby HSS cutter, and put in on just like the Sorby HSS, but use a Carr Lane precision washer underneath it for support…............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View Troy Cleckler 's profile

Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 836 days


#5 posted 09-12-2014 03:48 PM



I have one of those. If I want to remove the shaft, I can just point it downwards, and it ll fall out. LOL. I live in the desert, and I guess the wood was still a little wet when the handle was made, so when it got to my place, it dried out and cracked. The tool is loose in the handle. I would recommend you copy the design of the handle from a local wood rather than try to save it.
The bar, shank or neck on mine is 1/2” OD, and where it s flat, is .350” or between 5/16 and 3/8””. I think grinding a flat on the top to mount a carbide cutter would not leave enough threads to support the cutters you would be using. It would work for a time, but you will have a structural failure.
I would get a carbide cutter that is the same OD as the Sorby HSS cutter, and put in on just like the Sorby HSS, but use a Carr Lane precision washer underneath it for support…............. Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs


Mine is 3/4 round with flat ground on bottom. can’t use the cutter as is because this one mounts on the bottom of the tool.
The more I think about it the more I’m leaning on getting another tool for the carbide and using this one as is.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2103 days


#6 posted 09-12-2014 04:06 PM

I think one poster has givien you a hint. Dry the wood and it will shrink – make the job easier.

How to do it (without damage) is another question.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1886 posts in 1599 days


#7 posted 09-12-2014 07:43 PM

You could stick the tool in a vise and tap the handle off with a wood mallet or dead blow hammer.

-- Bill

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


#8 posted 09-15-2014 12:04 PM

You could try sticking it in the freezer for a few hours. That’s how I used to get the races and bearings on steering stems, back when I rode bikes. The cold temperature shrinks things enough that they will slip on, then when they warm up, they’re on for good.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

121 posts in 939 days


#9 posted 09-15-2014 08:27 PM

I believe that Hairy has it. On the commercially-handled tools that I have, the dimple on the ferrule does nothing but secure the ferrule to the handle. It does not do anything for securing the tool in the handle. Yours may differ, of course. But, if yours is like mine, simply grip the tool shank in a vice and pry the handle off. Since I CA mine into my home made handles, a little heat on the tool shank helps, too.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View Troy Cleckler 's profile

Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 836 days


#10 posted 09-15-2014 08:45 PM

Got it off! I put it in a vice and took a hammer and punch and got it off. It was glued in so I really had to hit it several times but was able to get it off without messing up the handle, so I can reuse it later.
I had to grind down the tang to 1/2” to use it in the hollower that I’m building.
I’ll give the hollower a test run tonight and see how it works – looks good so far though.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....

View moke's profile

moke

861 posts in 2241 days


#11 posted 09-15-2014 10:14 PM

I have done that same thing many times…next time put it in the vise and use an old open or closed end wrench over the ferrule and genlty finesse’ it with a hammer…...I even take pry bar handles off the pry bar and use the pry bar as stock to make cabide insert tools.
MIke

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