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Stanley no 220 knob

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Forum topic by djang000 posted 09-11-2014 08:41 PM 1549 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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djang000

67 posts in 1597 days


09-11-2014 08:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: knob 220

Hey guys

I found a stanley no 220 at a flea market the other day. I know it isn’t the most usefull block plane there is, but for 2$, I couldn’t resist. Plus, I wanted for some time to test painting a plane and see what kind of results I can get (and decide if I go down that road for other planes that could use a little love).

So I cleaned it, repainted (no too bad) and took care of the blade. I almost like it. It’s just that one thing; the knob is chipped.

It’s the kind where the wood was threaded, so I’m not sure how I could manage to build a new one. Any suggestion?

Thanks
sam


15 replies so far

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

696 posts in 1448 days


#1 posted 09-11-2014 08:45 PM

Buy a wood threader of the correct size.

http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/manualwoodthreader1-126tpi.aspx

-- Nick, "Choking to death on bacon is like getting murdered by your lover." - JG

View Don W's profile

Don W

17966 posts in 2032 days


#2 posted 09-11-2014 09:37 PM

I’ve had success with just making the hole smaller and force it on. Its a delicate line between to much force and it splits, and not enough force and it doesn’t work.

Another option is buy a threader as Nick suggested.

and a third option is find a bolt close to the same size and make a threader. All you need to do Take a bolt or screw the same size and with a file (use a triangular file or the corner of a square file) cut a groove perpendicular to the threads. Use this for threading.

And the last option, find a broken 220, and use the theaded piece to make a threader as in the last option.

And another option, ping Terry he’ll probably turn and thread one for you for next to nothing.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View floyd1365's profile

floyd1365

27 posts in 1312 days


#3 posted 09-11-2014 10:13 PM

looking at the 220 knob threads I would try making a threader out of a 7/16” lag bolt as the threads are coarser than any standard bolt thread i.m.o.. the threaded post on my 220 mics at .413 which would be bigger than 3/8” yet smaller than 7/16” so filing the bolt down to match the post may just work.

View upchuck's profile

upchuck

540 posts in 1130 days


#4 posted 09-12-2014 02:35 AM

Sam-
Not only a replacement knob from a #220…but I believe that a knob from a #110 or #120 would also fit as would knobs from a #203 and #140 (but why you’d want to pull knobs off the last two unless broken is beyond me).
Not all manufactures used the same threads on their knobs so be forewarned about switching among brands.

I have wondered if threads could be formed from epoxy? If a knob was turned and drilled to the “right” size and the post and surrounding neighborhood were masked off with saran wrap or wax could a blob of epoxy be put in the knob hole and then screwed onto the cast iron post?. Would the epoxy form threads inside the knob? Just wondering.

Good luck.

chuck

View djang000's profile

djang000

67 posts in 1597 days


#5 posted 09-12-2014 01:24 PM

Thanks all for your wisdom! :)

@Upstate; I thought about it but somehow the idea of spending 40+$ on a tool to fix a tool that costed 2$ bothers me :D

@Don; I’ll probably try your trick of making the hole 1/32 smaller than the threads and force it into. Maybe that just adding a drop of hot glue would help it stays in place without damaging the plane body if I ever want to replace it later

@upchuck; the idea of epoxy isn’t bad, but would probably be quite messy! :D

thanks again guys

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

361 posts in 915 days


#6 posted 09-12-2014 03:04 PM

The thing with the vintage Stanley planes is that they were designed before standard screw sizes where around. I needed a tote screw on mine, and ended up buying one for a few dollars off Ebay.

-- Nicholas

View Don W's profile

Don W

17966 posts in 2032 days


#7 posted 09-12-2014 09:05 PM



The thing with the vintage Stanley planes is that they were designed before standard screw sizes where around. I needed a tote screw on mine, and ended up buying one for a few dollars off Ebay.

- nicksmurf111

Actually the sizes are standard, just not “OUR” standard.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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nicksmurf111

361 posts in 915 days


#8 posted 09-12-2014 09:08 PM

From what I understand, that tote screw was an old standard that really didn’t catch on.

-- Nicholas

View Richard's profile

Richard

1898 posts in 2155 days


#9 posted 09-12-2014 09:23 PM



From what I understand, that tote screw was an old standard that really didn t catch on.

- nicksmurf111

You mean like that METRIC standard. :)

View 69BBNova's profile

69BBNova

341 posts in 1681 days


#10 posted 09-13-2014 05:35 AM

I agree with Don W, BUT…

If your not in love with this plane, and considering it stands you only $2, even though I can’t stand saying this,
just file the groove into the top threads of the plane itself…

I have considered doing this myself but I never could push myself to actually do it…

But it is an effective no cost option…

Just be aware you may hate yourself afterwards…lol.

Edit…Just had a thought, make a new knob with a slightly tight hole and epoxy it,,,

I’d actually rather do that.

View djang000's profile

djang000

67 posts in 1597 days


#11 posted 09-16-2014 03:14 PM

@69BBNova; yeah I thought about epoxying a new knob. But I don’t like doing stuff that is “permanent”. Removing epoxy isn’t fun, so I tend to avoid using it except for lamination.

But right now; I have a bigger problem; I realized that I need to find a way to turn the know. All the one that I did in the past was with my drill press where I use a bolt going through the whole wood block for turning. Now, I cannot do the same thing for this. So I’m thinking of either trying to build a lathe chuck for the drill press (not too sure how yet) or turn it as usual and plug the hole with a dowel (and pretend that it was part of the intended design… :D )

sam

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1539 days


#12 posted 09-16-2014 05:17 PM

@Don u mean the screw are metric or imperial?

I just tap the wood with metal taps. Works fine. Anything wrong with this process?

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JohnChung

372 posts in 1539 days


#13 posted 09-16-2014 05:20 PM

@Don u mean the screw are metric or imperial?

I just tap the wood with metal taps. Works fine. Anything wrong with this process?

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

361 posts in 915 days


#14 posted 09-16-2014 05:24 PM


@Don u mean the screw are metric or imperial?

I just tap the wood with metal taps. Works fine. Anything wrong with this process?

- JohnChung

I’ve done that before. In my specific experience mine was not METRIC and they are not a standard Imperial size. They were an imperial measurement, but not our current standard. Have fun finding the correct tap.

My #5 tote screw was a #12-20. I’m not sure what the knob screw is on a 220. Now I want to take mine apart and see.

-- Nicholas

View 69BBNova's profile

69BBNova

341 posts in 1681 days


#15 posted 09-20-2014 06:09 AM

I was just recently given a decent lathe, (its was free and now its better)...

But before that I used my drill press a couple of times and once I had to do something where I could not use a thru-bolt…

I drilled a hole in the piece I wanted to use and glued a good size dowel in it…

After I shaped it I cut the dowel off then drilled the size hole I actually needed…

This is what happens when you think how you would build things while waiting over 40 years until you have the machines to actually do it…

The part your going to love is I spent the holidays last year in the hospital because I had a stroke…

What the Hell Ya Gonna Do…lol…the thing is I actually laugh when I think about it…

I couldn’t really walk or use my right arm very much at all, then after a couple of hours dragging my self to the left to transfer myself without help I told the CNAs my right side was saying,

Wait For Me, Wait For Me…

The crazy part was it was the best holidays I have ever had in my entire life, a LOT of laughing.

I never new why I’ve always been that way.

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