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Forum topic by Notw posted 09-10-2014 02:59 PM 955 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Notw

468 posts in 1216 days


09-10-2014 02:59 PM

I coworker of mine has asked me to recreate his window surround because they are currently made of vinyl and his wife doesn’t like them and would prefer wood. Creating the basic oval and cutting it out weren’t a very big deal but now I am confused on how to create the profile that is on the surface. He says it doesn’t have to be exact but he would like it to be close. Thank you


16 replies so far

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 984 days


#1 posted 09-10-2014 03:13 PM

The profile can be done using different sized cove bits in a router, mounted in a (temporary ?) table. Do it before cutting out the center of your piece.

Drill holes in your table (or temporary surface) the correct radius for each cut and insert a peg. Then drill a hole in the center of your piece to fit over the peg. Turn the piece around the peg to cut the profiles.

Be sure to hold the piece tightly to avoid chatter, otherwise sanding will be more difficult than it needs to be. It’s always good practice to practice first on a scrap piece until you’re sure you’ve got the procedure down.

It might be a good idea to use a scrap plywood disk between the piece and your hands, not only to protect your hands but to help hold the piece flat on the table and to give it more beef. If the two pieces tend to slip, try using a piece of rubber drawer liner material between them or screwing them together.

Be sure to wax the table surface. Don’t try to cut the entire depth at once. Take it slow but steady. If it tends to burn you may have to up your speed a bit. Good luck and have fun.

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Notw

468 posts in 1216 days


#2 posted 09-10-2014 03:37 PM

so if I have already cut out the center how would i do this?

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DonBoston

75 posts in 925 days


#3 posted 09-10-2014 03:58 PM

Multiple pegs on the inside of the circle.

-- Don Boston RECreations by Don http://recreationsbydon.com

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 984 days


#4 posted 09-10-2014 06:15 PM

The back side will not be seen, I assume ? Tack it to backing piece(s), as mentioned above, and drill the center hole through the backing piece.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1183 days


#5 posted 09-10-2014 06:29 PM

These are usually done with a moulding machine capable of making round and elliptical shapes. The Williams and Hussey machine comes to mind. While there may be other ways to do this, I have no experience in doing it any other way.

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Notw

468 posts in 1216 days


#6 posted 09-10-2014 06:33 PM

Wow bibblockyeti those are awesome machines, wish I could afford those

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1183 days


#7 posted 09-10-2014 08:23 PM

They’re pricey, and pretty limited in what they can do, but if you’re in that business one could be invaluable.

View REO's profile

REO

889 posts in 1537 days


#8 posted 09-10-2014 09:07 PM

faceplate on a lathe

View Notw's profile

Notw

468 posts in 1216 days


#9 posted 09-11-2014 01:18 AM

REO i don’t have a lathe so i’m not sure what that means

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 904 days


#10 posted 09-12-2014 06:24 AM

Drill holes in your table (or temporary surface) the correct radius for each cut and insert a peg. Then drill a hole in the center of your piece to fit over the peg. Turn the piece around the peg to cut the profiles.

- Yonak

Trouble with this is—-he’s got an oval shape, not a circle. There is no “correct radius”. The lathe solution is problematic for the same reason.

You might be able to use two pegs like a fence in a router table—(or two bearing points attached to a fence)—the cut will vary some as the curve changes, but you should be able to “feather out” the difference with sandpaper, scrapers, ...

View jinkyjock's profile

jinkyjock

487 posts in 1037 days


#11 posted 09-12-2014 10:38 AM

Notw,
doesn’t look a very complex profile so have you thought of making a scratch stock.
There is a good video by Garret Hack (Fine Woodworking) on how to make one.
Cheers, Jinky (James).

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

639 posts in 1962 days


#12 posted 09-12-2014 03:39 PM

If you don’t use a scratch stock
(Search also on Paul Sellers blog and on “the village carpenter” blog for scratch stock)

You will find various electric router jig to make ellipses here on Lumberjock; some where the router moves others where the board moves under a fixed router.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 984 days


#13 posted 09-12-2014 04:53 PM


Drill holes in your table (or temporary surface) the correct radius for each cut and insert a peg. Then drill a hole in the center of your piece to fit over the peg. Turn the piece around the peg to cut the profiles.

- Yonak

Trouble with this is—-he s got an oval shape, not a circle. There is no “correct radius”. The lathe solution is problematic for the same reason.

You might be able to use two pegs like a fence in a router table—(or two bearing points attached to a fence)—the cut will vary some as the curve changes, but you should be able to “feather out” the difference with sandpaper, scrapers, ...

- jerryminer

Sorry .. missed the part about it being an ellipse and not a circle.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3551 posts in 1230 days


#14 posted 09-12-2014 04:57 PM

Why not veneer over the vinyl one?

-- earthartandfoods.com

View LeTurbo's profile

LeTurbo

217 posts in 1048 days


#15 posted 09-12-2014 07:49 PM

I’m thinking jerryminer has the solution I’d most likely try, with the two pegs. Otherwise, I might try a single peg on the inside of the oval – the trick here would be to keep a relative perpendicularity (if there’s such a thing) with the cutter. Now, as to getting the actual profiles – sheesh, that could be a bother unless you have a mad selection of cutters. This is where Mattias Wandel’s tilting router table would probably be useful.

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