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Powder coating hold fasts? Anyone tried?

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Forum topic by mdraft posted 09-10-2014 12:32 PM 945 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mdraft

26 posts in 836 days


09-10-2014 12:32 PM

Hi everyone,

I have a set of hold fasts that have a constant layer of surface rust. I was thinking of having them sand blasted and powder coated. Has anyone tried this before? Thoughts?


14 replies so far

View BubbaIBA's profile

BubbaIBA

383 posts in 1837 days


#1 posted 09-10-2014 01:55 PM

This is not answering your question but….A pair of holdfast from TFWW are less than $35 USD, I doubt you can get your current holdfasts sandblasted and powder coated for much less. In addition the Gramercy holdfasts are the best I’ve used. I’m not sure if powder coated holdfasts would have enough “tooth”.

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mdraft

26 posts in 836 days


#2 posted 09-10-2014 01:57 PM

Thanks for the reply. Those are the exact holdfasts I have. I checked with a local shop and it would run about $20 to get them blasted and coated. I was wondering about the “tooth” factor, but figured the powder coating is lightly textured and could work.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#3 posted 09-10-2014 02:00 PM

Have you tried any rust inhibitors on them? A little paste wax maybe?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View mdraft's profile

mdraft

26 posts in 836 days


#4 posted 09-10-2014 02:02 PM

I haven’t. My thought is that paste wax will make them slip.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#5 posted 09-10-2014 02:13 PM

Probably so. That being said, I’d still ask opinions here about less slick rust inhibitors. Chances are, you have other tools that could benefit from it as well.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#6 posted 09-10-2014 02:40 PM

Don’t you think powder coating them will make them slip also ?
How about using Evopo rust and just painting them with flat black paint.
http://www.harborfreight.com/http-www-harborfreight-com-1-gallon-evapo-rust-rust-remover-96431-html.html

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View BubbaIBA's profile

BubbaIBA

383 posts in 1837 days


#7 posted 09-10-2014 03:10 PM



Thanks for the reply. Those are the exact holdfasts I have. I checked with a local shop and it would run about $20 to get them blasted and coated. I was wondering about the “tooth” factor, but figured the powder coating is lightly textured and could work.

- mdraft

hummmm….I’ve had mine in my shop for several years with no maintenance and no rust. Could be because I live in the desert or maybe because they are in constant use. Is your bench Oak?

Just a suggestion: if you do decide to powder coat take a cold chisel and put some very light grooves on the inside edge to help with the hold. Please post your results, I’d like to know.

ken

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Sylvain

639 posts in 1960 days


#8 posted 09-10-2014 03:53 PM

http://www.renaissancewoodworker.com/give-your-workbench-timbers-time-to-dry/
Shanon Rogers had experienced rust due to a new bench:
(I still have to figure out how to select a text and then push on the link icon without loosing the selection with this tablet, argh…)

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View mdraft's profile

mdraft

26 posts in 836 days


#9 posted 09-10-2014 04:05 PM

Thanks for all the replies. My bench is pretty new so thats definitely worth considering. I also live in Michigan (and my bench is in the garage) my guess is the ambiant humidity is playing a role in the rust. its pretty light surface rust, but I would prefer to not have to worry about it. Anyone have experience with powder coating? Would the surface hold up to being hit with a nylon faced hammer?

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1711 posts in 1644 days


#10 posted 09-10-2014 04:13 PM

I would not do it. You can wax them occasionally to prevent rust, but I think powder coating it would affect the ability for them to hold, considering the TFWW and my own DIY forged holdfasts need some course radial sanding to stay seated.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Tim's profile

Tim

3110 posts in 1422 days


#11 posted 09-11-2014 12:05 AM

Here’s a video on using a center punch to add a lot of grip to a holdfast. That might be enough to get it to hold after being waxed or coated.
http://www.theenglishwoodworker.com/?p=1329

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 2153 days


#12 posted 09-11-2014 11:31 AM

I live in Western New York and humidity can get high here but all I do is just wipe down any bare steel tools with an old oily rag I’ve used while doing mechanic work. After a few times wiping them you end the rust problem. Of course you could oil them then wipe them down real good because you cannot actually rub all the oil off. Like my metal lathes and drill press table years of oil on them keeps them rust free and the surfaces don’t transfer oil to the wood unless I forget to wipe them after using oil on them. The more you use a bare steel tool the more oil gets into it just from your hands but that takes many years.

MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View mdraft's profile

mdraft

26 posts in 836 days


#13 posted 09-11-2014 12:04 PM

Great info. Thanks. I think I’ll try a light coating of oil for the time being. No need to over complicate an issue. Thanks again for all the suggestions.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17125 posts in 2566 days


#14 posted 09-11-2014 05:11 PM

I would clean them up real good, put a coat of clear spray on them and store them in a wood box or compartment if there is a bad rust problem. I keep wood covers on the ways and the vise on my mill and it keeps them rust free whereas they used to get pretty rusted over the winter with freezing and thawing..Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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