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What do you use to hold finish while finishing?

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Forum topic by CharlesA posted 09-09-2014 02:24 PM 862 views 2 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1264 days


09-09-2014 02:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

IN order to keep my Arm-R-Seal pristine, I am working on always dispensing some from the can, closing the can back up, and not returning any to the can. I’ve just been using cheap disposable plastic sandwich type containers to hold the currently used finish until the end of the project.

Any better ideas?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


19 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#1 posted 09-09-2014 02:30 PM

I save all manner of plastic containers just for this….the most common I have are the 16 oz. cottage cheese containers. But I also have a few smaller ones: Chobani yogurt cups are especially useful, and I’ve used paper Dixie cups (the smallest size) for the really small jobs. One thing about the cottage cheese cups, I can put the lid on them and stick them in the small fridge I have in the shop as I wait for the finish to dry between applications. these same containers also get used for the glues that i have to mix, like the plastic resin glue.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1264 days


#2 posted 09-09-2014 02:34 PM

I’ve used yogurt containers as well, but If I don’t have much in them, they are tippy.

We don’t eat much cottage cheese—probably why I haven’t thought of that.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Billy E's profile

Billy E

162 posts in 1547 days


#3 posted 09-09-2014 02:45 PM

I use Mason jars

-- Billy, Florence SC

View Thewoodenmind's profile

Thewoodenmind

6 posts in 826 days


#4 posted 09-09-2014 02:46 PM

My favorite containers are those with lids for the same reason Fred H listed. I have used a lot of leftover plastic and glass containers to hold finish. In addition to not returning finishes keep original can pure I often mix stains and dies (not with each other) and therefore cannot return them to original containers making a more permanent container necessary. For these I use glass jars most often baby food or old sauce jars. I just apply a label and then it is there for touch ups or if I want to repeat a certain color in the future. When I am using a wipe on technique I poke a few small holes in the metal lid of the jar and tilt it onto the rag as it is not always easy or clean to dip the rag down in a small neck of a jar like a baby food jar.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1836 days


#5 posted 09-09-2014 02:51 PM

I use these :

They’re the 1/2 pint wide-mouth canning jars from Target ($4.29 for a pack of 4). I like them because they’re resealable, and the wide mouth is big enough to dip a brush or cloth into. I take a sharpie and label the tops (I use them for Arm-R-Seal, shellac, dyes, BLO, etc). When I’m done with them, they’re fairly easy to clean out because nothing sticks too well to them.

I also have some large ones with flip-top lids and rubber gromets that I used for mixing dyes and stains in larger batches. I picked those up for a few bucks at Christmas Tree Shop.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1264 days


#6 posted 09-09-2014 02:52 PM

Ed, Thanks. Those look great. I had dismissed Mason jars b/c I was thinking of full size ones.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1836 days


#7 posted 09-09-2014 02:53 PM

If you give cutting boards as gifts, those half-pint ones also are a good size for giving oil with it. I mix up mineral oil and beeswax to give with mine, and everybody gets a half-pint of that with their board.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2043 days


#8 posted 09-09-2014 03:06 PM



If you give cutting boards as gifts, those half-pint ones also are a good size for giving oil with it. I mix up mineral oil and beeswax to give with mine, and everybody gets a half-pint of that with their board.

- BinghamtonEd

Great idea BinghamtonEd! Forward thinking with a nice gift and a fine cutting
board as well.

View Billy E's profile

Billy E

162 posts in 1547 days


#9 posted 09-09-2014 04:15 PM



I use these :

- BinghamtonEd

I use those exact same ones

-- Billy, Florence SC

View LeTurbo's profile

LeTurbo

217 posts in 1052 days


#10 posted 09-09-2014 06:59 PM

Cheap ceramic breakfast bowls. I think they cost about 90c in your language. If the paint dries out, I can usually peel it out. To keep it wet, a little clingwrap.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6576 posts in 1617 days


#11 posted 09-09-2014 07:52 PM

The finish doesn’t stick to the inside of the mason jars? I would think that it would make a mess in there and you’d have to buy more every so often.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1402 days


#12 posted 09-09-2014 08:55 PM

Good call Ed. I might need to score some of those.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#13 posted 09-10-2014 12:40 AM



I use these :

They re the 1/2 pint wide-mouth canning jars from Target ($4.29 for a pack of 4). I like them because they re resealable, and the wide mouth is big enough to dip a brush or cloth into. I take a sharpie and label the tops (I use them for Arm-R-Seal, shellac, dyes, BLO, etc). When I m done with them, they re fairly easy to clean out because nothing sticks too well to them.

I also have some large ones with flip-top lids and rubber gromets that I used for mixing dyes and stains in larger batches. I picked those up for a few bucks at Christmas Tree Shop.

- BinghamtonEd

I use those as well and the lids won’t stick if you screw them on over a couple of layers of Ziplock bag plastic.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1836 days


#14 posted 09-10-2014 12:13 PM


I use those as well and the lids won t stick if you screw them on over a couple of layers of Ziplock bag plastic.

- gfadvm

Hm, didn’t think of that. I have a roll of cling wrap in the garage I put on cauls, I bet that would work as well. Thanks!

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14625 posts in 2150 days


#15 posted 09-10-2014 12:24 PM

I stopped at the Paint dept. at Lowes. They had a few plastic cups…CHEAP. Currently have a “large” one sitting on the bench. It has a BLO-Varnish- Walnut stain mix in it. and a cheap brush. Hasn’t set up yet. Seems to do the job, for about $.98 + tax.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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