LumberJocks

first post - scored some wild cherry logs

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by gts78 posted 09-06-2014 11:26 PM 1205 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View gts78's profile

gts78

12 posts in 824 days


09-06-2014 11:26 PM

Topic tags/keywords: logs milling splitting cherry wood

Hello everyone, I am Greg. Brand new to the forum and a new woodworker as well.

My parents had a wild cherry tree cut down today and my dad asked me if I wanted any of the wood. I ended up bringing home 5 logs that are around 14 – 16 inches in diameter and maybe 20 inches long. I am mainly intersted in getting some bowl blanks from them since turning is my main area of interest. I will try to post pics tomorrow. One log has a burl on the side about half as big as a basketball and another is a double crotch.

My main question for you all is how quickly do I need to get these cut up to avoid splitting? I don’t own a chainsaw yet and am having some trouble finding one to borrow. I have them stored in my basement tonight. It is cool, dark and dry down there. A lot of the smaller pieces (branches 4 – 6 inch diameter) were already starting to split when I got there. I think those were cut down yesterday. I realize there are probably a lot of factors that go into how the wood behaves, but do you think I need to go rent a chainsaw tomorrow and get this done asap?


14 replies so far

View summerfi's profile

summerfi

3315 posts in 1152 days


#1 posted 09-06-2014 11:56 PM

Don’t wait to saw them up before you paint the ends with melted paraffin. Do that immediately if not sooner. They will start to split very quickly as you’ve already observed. Sawing won’t prevent splitting. When a 2’ log splits from both ends, you don’t have much left. Go to the grocery store and buy some canning paraffin and coat the ends tonight. Heat the paraffin in a double boiler (one pan with water, then another pan inside that) to help prevent the paraffin from catching fire.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- Rocky Mountain Saw Works http://www.rmsaws.com/p/about-us.html

View gts78's profile

gts78

12 posts in 824 days


#2 posted 09-07-2014 12:11 AM

Thanks. I actually posted this last night but I guess there was a delay of waiting for my first post to be approved. I am very surprised that they have not started to split yet. Although I am not going to push my luck. Would painting the ends with latex paint I have left over be sufficient or is that a bad idea?

View gts78's profile

gts78

12 posts in 824 days


#3 posted 09-07-2014 12:15 AM

I should have added that I do understand that sawing them won’t prevent splitting. I was just hoping I’d be able to get them sawed quickly and then seal the ends. Still working on finding a chainsaw. Couldn’t get to a rental today due to family obligations.

View summerfi's profile

summerfi

3315 posts in 1152 days


#4 posted 09-07-2014 12:34 AM

Coating the ends with latex paint may help a little, but very little. They will still split. Paraffin is the way to go. If you were doing this on a larger scale, I would recommend a product called Anchorseal. Since you have to order it, it wouldn’t be practical for your situation. Welcome to LJ by the way.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- Rocky Mountain Saw Works http://www.rmsaws.com/p/about-us.html

View gts78's profile

gts78

12 posts in 824 days


#5 posted 09-07-2014 12:39 AM

Thanks, Bob. I am familiar with anchorseal. I have a small amount that someone gave me but not nearly enough for this. I will see if the local grocery store has the paraffin.

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2608 days


#6 posted 09-07-2014 01:44 AM

Welcome, Greg. Free logs are one of my favourite sources for lumber.

Anchorseal 2 is sold by the gallon at Woodcraft if you have one nearby. I don’t know how it is different from regular anchorseal though.

View tnwood's profile

tnwood

249 posts in 2552 days


#7 posted 09-07-2014 02:29 AM

My local Woodcraft sells Anchorseal 2 in quarts. As best I can tell, the #2 formula is just a stabilized formula to make it freeze stable. Heavy coats of latex paint will help. I have used it a lot on cherry and normally have little problems with checking on the ends. My last salvage was persimmon which was latex coated to start and then a subsequent coat of Anchorseal 2 when I was able to get it a couple weeks later due to my schedule. So far so good.

View splatman's profile

splatman

562 posts in 864 days


#8 posted 09-07-2014 03:53 AM

Coat the ends with what you have on hand now. Recoat with better stuff when you get it.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#9 posted 09-07-2014 11:38 AM

Yes, coat with what you have until you can get the paraffin wax or some anchorseal. Latex paint is actually a poor end sealer compared to wax or anchorseal.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1400 days


#10 posted 09-07-2014 02:13 PM

Just a hint, don’t try to mill large logs by yourself. I did that last week and dang near burnt up my bandsaw. Those logs are way to heavy too deal with alone.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View gts78's profile

gts78

12 posts in 824 days


#11 posted 09-08-2014 02:18 AM

Thanks for all the replies. I did end up getting the paraffin wax and sealed all the ends. Hopefully that will keep them safe until I get my hands on a chainsaw. I do have a Woodcraft not too far from here, about 40 minutes or so. I will probably go get some anchorseal there to use if I end up getting the main log milled.

As for storage once I get all the lumber milled and the ends sealed, is keeping it in an outside shed a bad idea? It is one of those Rubbermaid sheds. It is not in direct sunlight but the weather here does fluctuate a bit. Our winters can be very dry and cold while the summers can get hot and very humid. Would I have to worry about termites finding it in the shed?

Here are some images of what I’ve brought home:

View richardwootton's profile

richardwootton

1699 posts in 1420 days


#12 posted 09-08-2014 04:14 AM

I’m not sure about storing them in your shed, but that sure is a nice little Burl you’ve got there.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#13 posted 09-08-2014 11:51 AM

The shed is OK because cherry dries well and the rounds need to dry slow to prevent cracking. The shed will slow the drying.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View gts78's profile

gts78

12 posts in 824 days


#14 posted 09-08-2014 05:31 PM

Would the shed still be ok once the logs are milled into blanks/boards?

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com