LumberJocks

what do you use for blotch control?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by distrbd posted 09-04-2014 11:52 PM 1407 views 1 time favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1913 days


09-04-2014 11:52 PM

What do you use to condition prior to staining?I have heard a lot of praises on Charles Neil’s Blotch control but it is way to expensive to have it shipped to Canada,the shipping alone is $22 ! the total for a quart of blotch control :$42.00.
Other than Charles Neil’s blotch control and dewax/diluted Shellac,(sorry mr. Searl .lol) what do you use ? I used Minwax wood conditioner ,not too bad but I had to put 2-3 coats of it,not practical,Have some General sanding sealer but it’s not really a pre-stain wood conditioner .
Do you have a personal favorite?your own recipe maybe?

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada


22 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#1 posted 09-05-2014 12:38 AM

In my case, the same finish becomes the sealer. Apply, sand, apply, sand. As far as staining goes, sorry, never use it because I love the natural look.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1913 days


#2 posted 09-05-2014 03:05 AM

I understand what you are saying mr jinx but sometimes you need to stain wood like Poplar,pine ,they look too bland otherwise.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#3 posted 09-05-2014 11:58 AM

Probably the easiest and cheapest approach is to just use a washcoat of whatever finish you intend to top coat with. A washcoat is highly thinned, with varnish maybe 1/3 varnish, 2/3 thinner, a 1# shellac cut, 50/50 lacquer/thinner, or the 1/3-2/3 for water bornes (all thinning suggestions from Bob Flexner). I’ve used both shellac and varnish with good results.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#4 posted 09-05-2014 12:05 PM

True. The only time I stained soft wood was my pine tongue and groove ceiling. I thinned water base paint as stain, applied it and wiped with a rag and varnished over it after it dried… It turned out pretty good. All the grains are visible.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1701 days


#5 posted 09-05-2014 12:07 PM

I am a fan of hide glue sizing. It is thinned hot hide glue one concocts in a glue pot such as a small crock pot. It is spread on the lumber and allowed to dry 24 hours. The lightly smooth it with #000 steel wool.
Water based products do not affect it unless one gets carried away and rub the stain/dye too hard into the piece.
As always test first. It is great on end grain.

-- Jerry

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2389 days


#6 posted 09-05-2014 01:10 PM

I mix wall board compound, as used for taping up seams in drywall, mixed with water to the consistency of milk. Very thin. Apply one coat, with brush, like painting. After drying, sand it all off. Then apply stain and finish. I put about three or four extra coats of this on any end grain.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8261 posts in 2895 days


#7 posted 09-05-2014 02:07 PM

Maple seems to be the only hardwood that blotches for me. I’ve used Charles Neil’s product with good results. However, Fred’s method works just as well for me and far less expensive.

I will definitely try Jim’s method on oak as a grain filler.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1913 days


#8 posted 09-05-2014 02:17 PM

Jim’s method seem to also work with water based dyes as well as oil based stains.
I have tried Fred’s method so far ,it should also work as a toner if mixed with a stain,but never tried Jerry’s hide glue idea.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View Finisherman's profile

Finisherman

227 posts in 1316 days


#9 posted 09-05-2014 04:14 PM

A wash coat of any finish will work, as long as it’s thin enough. For a really blotchy wood, I’d likely mix a dye into some very thin finish to make a toner and then spray that onto the sealed surface. I haven’t yet tried Charles Neil’s blotch control but most of the reviews that I’ve read seem to be positive.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#10 posted 09-05-2014 05:54 PM

Shellac bullseye sealcoat thinned 3 parts denatured alcohol to 2 parts sealcoat. It is a pretty thin mixture, but it brushes on easily and works wonders to control blotching. It only takes one coat to seal the wood.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View AnonymousRequest's profile

AnonymousRequest

861 posts in 1016 days


#11 posted 09-05-2014 06:17 PM

I’m with mrjinx. I never stain anything unless I am forced to by a client and that would be rare. I’m in the “if you want something to look like walnut” you use walnut camp. The actual finish is worked to fill and seal.

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1014 days


#12 posted 09-05-2014 11:12 PM

When I built houses, used a tiny bit of sanding sealer with thinner to go over pine as it would be blotchy otherwise. If you sanded the pine, it didn’t blotch.

-- Jim from Kansas

View Razorburne's profile

Razorburne

41 posts in 886 days


#13 posted 09-06-2014 03:56 AM

General Finishes does actually have a pre-stain conditioner—- I’ve used it on my last two projects in which I stained pine and it worked very well.

It is different than their “sanding sealer”. They have one conditioner that is oil based and one that is water based. Go directly to their site and check it out. I’ve only had experience with the oil-based product.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1913 days


#14 posted 09-06-2014 10:54 AM


General Finishes does actually have a pre-stain conditioner—- I ve used it on my last two projects in which I stained pine and it worked very well.

It is different than their “sanding sealer”. They have one conditioner that is oil based and one that is water based. Go directly to their site and check it out. I ve only had experience with the oil-based product.

- Razorburne


I’m now a big fan of their w/b products ,their W/B Sanding sealer is on my shopping list.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 858 days


#15 posted 09-06-2014 01:37 PM

Trying to understand what these “sealer” products are doing.

As I understand the discussion we have a situation where one is applying relatively dark stain to some bare wood. Some parts of the wood soak up more stain and thus wind up darker than other areas…and some wood does this in an unpleasing fashion?

So these sealers combat that by soaking in to those same “more soak-ish” areas and hardening there…so when you apply the stain it is less prone to soaking into those “more soak-ish” areas.

Have I got this right?

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com