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Can you identify this wood?

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Forum topic by DLC posted 09-04-2014 11:35 PM 1179 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DLC

21 posts in 363 days


09-04-2014 11:35 PM

Ok jocks, I need some help with this. I found a couple pieces of a log next to a road and since they looked in good condition, I decided to take them home and mill them up on my table saw. I’d like to know what kind of wood it is. Below are some pictures of the cut board with a piece of the bark and then a photo of the end grain. I can tell you that the log was pretty light weight. The hardness seems to be harder than pine but softer than maple. Any ideas?

-- Daniel, Durham, NC


43 replies so far

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3164 posts in 1230 days


#1 posted 09-04-2014 11:40 PM

Being that you are in NC, it looks kind of like American Sycamore to me.

Maybe some close up shots?

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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Dallas

3164 posts in 1230 days


#2 posted 09-04-2014 11:41 PM

I take that back, sycamore peels like paper type bark. Hmmmmmm.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1207 posts in 1219 days


#3 posted 09-05-2014 12:45 AM

Looks like hickory from what i can see in the pics, but hickory is dense and heavy.

Cut the end grain clean with a razor knife and take a close up pic.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View richardwootton's profile

richardwootton

1453 posts in 698 days


#4 posted 09-05-2014 01:27 AM

It would be easier to tell if it were planed.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View DLC's profile

DLC

21 posts in 363 days


#5 posted 09-05-2014 03:48 AM

Ok, thanks for the input. I’ll try to get a cleaner end pic and planed surface pic tomorrow.

-- Daniel, Durham, NC

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

489 posts in 264 days


#6 posted 09-05-2014 04:15 AM


I take that back, sycamore peels like paper type bark. Hmmmmmm.

- Dallas

I wouldn’t rule out sycamore so quickly. The peely bark in sycamore is in young trees and in the upper branches of older trees. Here is a photo of some sycamore trees I saw in Asheville a couple of weeks ago. That’s some gnarly bark if I ever saw it. :

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1207 posts in 1219 days


#7 posted 09-06-2014 03:25 PM

The wood looks ring porous to me. Hard to say exactly. Again, a good end grain pic that is sliced clean with ta razor knife will tell the tale.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

258 posts in 473 days


#8 posted 09-06-2014 04:07 PM

I wouldn t rule out sycamore so quickly. The peely bark in sycamore is in young trees and in the upper branches of older trees. Here is a photo of some sycamore trees I saw in Asheville a couple of weeks ago. That s some gnarly bark if I ever saw it. :

- Yonak

That’s not gnarly bark. That’s some darn good looking turning wood. Sure would be nice to see the innards….... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View DLC's profile

DLC

21 posts in 363 days


#9 posted 09-08-2014 02:18 AM

Ok, I planed the end grain and took the best shot I could. I’ve really been surprised by how hard this wood is for its weight. Comparable to cherry in that way.
Any thoughts from these end grain pics?


-- Daniel, Durham, NC

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5444 posts in 1342 days


#10 posted 09-08-2014 02:20 AM

Mulberry is what it looks like to me.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

5772 posts in 600 days


#11 posted 09-08-2014 02:20 AM

White oak

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View richardwootton's profile

richardwootton

1453 posts in 698 days


#12 posted 09-08-2014 04:03 AM

The medullary rays aren’t prominite enough for it be be white oak from what I can tell.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

489 posts in 264 days


#13 posted 09-08-2014 04:25 AM


Ok, I planed the end grain and took the best shot I could. I ve really been surprised by how hard this wood is for its weight. Comparable to cherry in that way.
Any thoughts from these end grain pics?


- DLC

It’s really interesting how much different the wood looks in these pictures compared to the first pictures.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1207 posts in 1219 days


#14 posted 09-08-2014 11:49 AM

The wavy bands in the latewood identify it as an elm.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Mike Throckmorton's profile

Mike Throckmorton

79 posts in 408 days


#15 posted 09-08-2014 12:02 PM

Second the elm. Though hard to find in the wild.

Which I found can be odd to work. At least the ancient dried out stuff I had to work with.

-- You are never complete, you just draw a line where done is and stop at that line.

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