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Forum topic by ADHDan posted 09-04-2014 01:22 PM 829 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ADHDan

800 posts in 1568 days


09-04-2014 01:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

So as I mentioned in a prior thread (http://lumberjocks.com/topics/61023 ), in the next few days I’m going to be receiving a U-Haul filled with lumber – enough air-dried live edge slabs of domestic hardwood to fill a roughly 10×10 storage room. There is no way that I can store this amount of wood in my house, so I’m going to have to keep it outside on the asphalt under my deck (which is about 12’x20’). I live in the Twin Cities, so we get some significant humidity and temperature swings.

After reading a bunch of other resources on the topic of lumber storage, I feel like I’ve gotten conflicting advice and I’d like to see what the consensus is on LJ and also ask some questions. My current (tentative) plan is:

—Put 4×4 cedar strips on the asphalt to elevate the first layer of hardwood off the ground and sticker between each layer with 1” x 1.5” pine strips (ripped from BORG two-bys);
—Hang sheets of underlayment from the deck joists over the woodpile with a slight downward grade, to create a ceiling/canopy that will sluice away water that drips down between the deck boards;
—Hang tarps down to the ground around the sides of the deck to prevent water and snow from blowing under the deck.

Basically, the goal would be to enclose the underside of the deck with a wood ceiling and tarp walls. This won’t keep out atmospheric moisture but it should keep rain/snow from getting directly on the lumber.

My question is whether there is anything else I should do (or do differently). Some resources suggest I wrap each individual slab in plastic, which would be way too time-consuming and difficult. Other resources suggest draping a tarp over the entire lumber pile and weighting it down to seal off the wood, but I’ve read that this can trap atmospheric moisture and promote mold. Finally, some resources have suggested draping a tarp loosely over the pile (as sort of a “backup canopy”), but not covering it completely or weighting it down so that air can still circulate through the wood.

I don’t have the time to build/resources to buy an actual storage shed right now, and assuming I can close it off decently I feel like this would be a great way to utilize the wasted space under my deck. I just want to do it in a way that keeps my lumber in reasonably good shape. Thoughts?

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.


7 replies so far

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recoveringoakaholic

8 posts in 834 days


#1 posted 09-04-2014 01:41 PM

Hi Dan,

I too live in MN and stored about 500 bd ft. of sugar maple and 400 bd ft of walnut outside. I didn’t have an asphalt\level foundation to start with so I ended up putting down a number of cinder blocks to create a level area and then laid good flat pallets on top of them.

I used 2x material as the bottom stickers and then sticker-ed with 1x material. The boards were fresh milled from a couple of neighbors trees. I sealed the ends with an oil based paint, sticker-ed them and then covered loosely with a tarp leaving the ends open for air movement. After 5 yrs of drying I finally ran them through my thickness planer and have been building projects with the wood ever since.

I think the most important point is to let air circulate around the boards and to keep rain and snow off of them.

-- Living under the radar......heading for off the grid.

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ADHDan

800 posts in 1568 days


#2 posted 09-04-2014 01:56 PM

Thanks RO, that’s great to hear. My asphalt isn’t actually level (it slopes downward from north to south) but I hopefully that won’t matter if I put down 4×4 or cinder block stickers every two feet down the length of the first layer. I.e., the boards will be stacked on a grade, but sufficiently supported along their length all the way down the grade. I’ll try to post a picture soon to show what I mean.

Based on your experience I’m thinking I’ll tarp around the deck and drape a loose tarp over the pile, not fully covering the ends, and paint the ends like you did.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1571 posts in 1936 days


#3 posted 09-05-2014 12:50 AM

Make sure that the pile can get good air exchange. If not, the wood could get damp and rot. It is very important that rain/water does not fall directly on the stack. A good roof over the wood is better that tarps.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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ADHDan

800 posts in 1568 days


#4 posted 09-05-2014 12:41 PM

That’s the plan – I’m hanging the underlayment to make a suspended ceiling under the deck, sloped downward slightly to guide runoff. Here are some pictures of the setup; I’ll be hanging tarps around the sides of the deck to prevent rain/snow from blowing in. Please let me know what you think. Thanks!

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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WDHLT15

1571 posts in 1936 days


#5 posted 09-06-2014 03:23 PM

If your stacks are not level end to end, your lumber will not be either.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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ADHDan

800 posts in 1568 days


#6 posted 09-06-2014 03:33 PM

Hmmm. Not a whole lot I can do about that considering the cramped space, other than try to elevate the south side a bit. But these will mostly be really thick rough cut slabs, which will need to be squared and surfaced later, so hopefully it won’t matter too much.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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firefighterontheside

13442 posts in 1316 days


#7 posted 09-06-2014 03:44 PM

Why don’t you do what JL7 who also lives in the twin cities did. He’s drying walnut this way. He used corrugated metal roofing and placed it on top of the stack of wood with cinder blocks on the top to hold them down. I believe that would be the best cheapest way to create a roof over the wood. Make sure it overhangs the sides by a good 12 inches. I’ll look for his post and pictures.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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