LumberJocks

Save me from a bad idea--installing walk through door in roll up garage door

  • Advertise with us

« back to Focus on the Workspace forum

Forum topic by CharlesA posted 09-01-2014 01:36 AM 1049 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1911 posts in 520 days


09-01-2014 01:36 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

So . . . my shop is a one car garage with the only entrance being a roll up door. Saw on youtube this mod of such a door where the guy cuts a door size opening out of the garage door, and with a combination of garage door hinges and overlapping metal frame, makes a walk through door in the garage door while keeping the roll-up working.

Seems like a project fraught with difficulties, but with possibilities. What do you think?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


19 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

962 posts in 208 days


#1 posted 09-01-2014 01:43 AM

Sounds like a pain but anything is possible.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

5471 posts in 579 days


#2 posted 09-01-2014 02:02 AM

Ok I watched the video. I guess it can be done. Now, go and make a door in the wall.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View stan3443's profile

stan3443

208 posts in 998 days


#3 posted 09-01-2014 03:07 AM

worked at a shop in Maryland that had a walk in door in the overhead worked great

-- If your not supposed to have hair on your face......why does it grow their

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

632 posts in 652 days


#4 posted 09-01-2014 05:18 AM

Sounds like a screen door on a submarine.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View redryder's profile

redryder

2217 posts in 1824 days


#5 posted 09-01-2014 05:36 AM

After seeing that great Cherry and Walnut table you did, I’d say you can handle it…...................

-- mike...............

View BJODay's profile

BJODay

394 posts in 665 days


#6 posted 09-01-2014 01:08 PM

At work, (firefighting), we occasionally cut doorways into roll-up doors. We do this when the building is on fire and we need access or egress. Those roll-up doors get thrown away when we’re done.

I would make a door through another wall. Much less can go wrong. You would have more options for width, windows, no step, dutch door, screen door for ventilation etc.

BJ

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

5471 posts in 579 days


#7 posted 09-01-2014 01:12 PM

Yeah, and ours are usually in the shape of a triangle.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View freddy1962's profile

freddy1962

898 posts in 271 days


#8 posted 09-01-2014 01:53 PM

If you have no experience installing doors and jambs, I wouldn’t make this your first attempt. Put the door in a wall. The youtube poster probably won’t post the video of the pile of door panels laying on the floor.

-- JEFF Illinois (Banks of the Mississippi)

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3847 posts in 2090 days


#9 posted 09-01-2014 05:54 PM

I have thought about doing that same thing but I am reluctant to start cutting on my garage door!
I looks it is possible and in my case the only alternative as there is no wall space for a regular door.
It does look like a lot of work!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1911 posts in 520 days


#10 posted 09-01-2014 05:57 PM

Putting in a regular door is not in the cards at the moment, although I should check to see if it would work where the side window is.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View neverenougftackle's profile

neverenougftackle

195 posts in 568 days


#11 posted 09-01-2014 07:15 PM

I am going against the flow here, and think that that guy deserves an award. There possablity a patent there, if’n it could pass some local codes. A shop made up and down ramp would be easly made to get over that treshold hump. I could also see a recessed lockable handle like in RV’s. He cought some of the hold backs I had in question in viewing his video, but he also has had 4 years to see if it is still there. Post a question on this web site asking ?

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

601 posts in 436 days


#12 posted 09-01-2014 07:37 PM

Great project. Do it!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

904 posts in 832 days


#13 posted 09-01-2014 10:12 PM

I see these on a regular basis around New England.

They seemed to have been popular in the 1950’s and 60’s in houses built on lots where the garage door has slopes or wall on both sides, and there was nowhere to put a human door.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

904 posts in 832 days


#14 posted 09-02-2014 10:58 AM

On the local examples I’m familiar with, the human door doesn’t fold.

It’s not the full height of the usually 4 panel roll-up door, maybe 5’ of the 7’ door, leaving a step at the bottom, and a section at the top. As I remember, the door jamb is attached only to the second from the bottom or top roll-up section, and the door separates from the others as the roll up transits up and down. As the roll-up flattens in the down position, the jamb is pulled tight against the face of the door and sealed by weatherstripping.

Remember, this is New England, home of simple solutions… ;^) I’m sure many of the doors I’m referring to were built in place, not purchased. They’re in inexpensive homes where the garage is also the basement. Opening the overhead to walk in and out in cold weather meant losing all the heat in the basement.

Other was to skin the cat is to simply replace the overhead door with a pair of swinging doors, or one that bi-folds outward, raised by a cable and pulley inside. On the bi-fold, you could attach the door jamb to the bottom section and let the top separate as the door folds. We have a 20’ x 40’ steel bifold on our airplane hangar. Even though the panels are high enough to fit a full-sized human door, there is still a 9-12” stepover at the bottom to accommodate the panel frame.

View freddy1962's profile

freddy1962

898 posts in 271 days


#15 posted 09-02-2014 11:42 AM

I’ve seen quite a few man doors installed within a overhead door, mostly in commercial applications/businesses. These doors were designed and installed with the optional man door to be in it. To cut a hole in a residential overhead door, that wasn’t designed for this application would be asking for trouble.

-- JEFF Illinois (Banks of the Mississippi)

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase