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Forum topic by harum posted 08-30-2014 09:37 PM 1659 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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harum

216 posts in 1108 days


08-30-2014 09:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: drill press sander

Was wondering if it would be reasonable to pay $100 total for two Central Machinery tools: a drill press S-987 and a sander S-5154? Made in 1990, no rust, sold by the owner.

Would appreciate any comment. Thanks, h.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."


10 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#1 posted 08-30-2014 10:02 PM

I would if I wanted the tools. It’s one drive to
get the 2 and the price is impossible to get hurt on.

Harbor Freight is a bargain shop to be sure but
in terms of that sort of basic machine they
do a decent job and the tools get the work done.

View harum's profile

harum

216 posts in 1108 days


#2 posted 08-30-2014 10:32 PM

Thanks, Loren.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#3 posted 08-31-2014 12:36 AM

HF has their 5 speed drill press on sale right now (with a super coupon) for $70, and their belt/disc sander on sale for $80 ($64 with a 20% off coupon). Both machines you are looking at are also fairly old (sander is almost 25 years old). If they are in good mechanical condition, you would be saving about $45, but giving up any warranty protection, and finding replacement parts might be difficult or impossible. Difficult call.. I personally prefer old american iron, but if they are something you really need, it’s might not be too bad of a deal and you could always upgrade later.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View harum's profile

harum

216 posts in 1108 days


#4 posted 08-31-2014 01:59 AM

Brad, thank you. Even though these tools were manufactured outside the U.S. (close to where they are made these days, but not quite there), wouldn’t it be fair to assume that back then the tools of this brand were of better built? I think the price is reasonable considering the long drive to the nearest store vs. a walk a few houses down the street.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View Odiferous's profile

Odiferous

105 posts in 1656 days


#5 posted 08-31-2014 02:30 AM

Coupons for both the sander and little drill press are frequently in woodworking mags for around $55 each. Given that these are some 20 years old, they might have a little more steel in them than their modern counterparts, but will otherwise be pretty similar.

That being said, if the owner used them enough to shake the bugs out but did not abuse them, and they look like they’re holding up well, then you could certainly do worse for $100.

View Steve Peterson's profile

Steve Peterson

324 posts in 2547 days


#6 posted 08-31-2014 05:32 AM

I suspect that the quality is better than what you can get at HF today, assuming that they are in good shape and you actually need both tools. If you watch certain tools at HF, you will notice that the quality keeps getting worse over time. The motors and wiring get smaller. Switches are lower quality. Everything is designed to fit a certain price point and HF really pushes lower prices. 1990 made in Taiwan is bound to be better than today’s offering.

$100 for both sounds like a fair price. See it he would take $80. $100 each and I would pass.

-- Steve

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#7 posted 08-31-2014 05:39 AM

Consider too, that stuff is made for the Asian market.
Craftspeople there will not settle for junk any more
than Americans will. It keeps the standards
reasonably decent. The idea that Asian manufacturers
would produce total junk for the export market
only is absurd. Iron casting and machining costs
what it costs in terms of time and infrastructure.

Most “American” woodworking tool brands are now
doing foundry and machining work primarily
in Asia. The work is made to hit price points
or sure, but there’s little upside to the factories
turning out useless junk.

In short, that’s a thumbs up, cost relative.

View DurocShark's profile

DurocShark

65 posts in 2236 days


#8 posted 08-31-2014 07:49 PM

The failure points on that generation of HF machine are all in the fit/finish and the power switch. Power switches fail fairly frequently in those. But as long as the tools work, a switch is cheap and easy to replace if/when it fails.

If I needed them, I’d probably pay the $100 for them.

-- -Don

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2708 days


#9 posted 08-31-2014 08:06 PM

Because the two machines are made in Taiwan, I would buy them. If they were made in China, that would be a different story. That they have lasted 24 years and still working is testament to their quality.

View harum's profile

harum

216 posts in 1108 days


#10 posted 08-31-2014 08:36 PM

Thanks for all the comments!

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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