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Kreg foreman pocket hole machine

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Forum topic by Medickep posted 08-29-2014 11:05 PM 669 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Medickep

367 posts in 424 days


08-29-2014 11:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource kreg foreman pocket holes

I was curious if anyone has had a chance to buy Kreg’s foreman pocket hole machine and what they had to say about it. I must admit, it looks a little cheap on the picture for the price, but Kreg always seems to make quality products. As a hobbyists I probably won’t run out and buy it, but I’ve notice that my elbows hurt in larger projects as I use the mini jig and probably push the drill and jig to hard together instead of letting the drill do the work. My temporary answer is to buy the hex pocket hole bit for my impact driver!! I’ve had tennis elbow on my right side, which is no joke and felt it coming on my left side!

Thanks,

-- Keith


18 replies so far

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Bill White

3496 posts in 2646 days


#1 posted 08-29-2014 11:41 PM

I kinda think that it is overkill for a hobby shop.
Just my opinion.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Medickep

367 posts in 424 days


#2 posted 08-30-2014 12:25 AM

Bill-

Do you own one or just merely your opinion. Not sure if you’re a hobbyist or not. I must have drilled 500 pocket holes in my built-ins!

-- Keith

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Loren

7723 posts in 2334 days


#3 posted 08-30-2014 12:32 AM

Pocket hole drills work best at the high speeds provided
by a corded drill. The hole gets drilled fast with
minimized heat.

I tried with an impact driver. It started “impacting”
and I tried an 18v drill in comparison. The drill
was faster. A corded drill is faster too but to
get mine out and set it up takes a few minutes.
I used to keep it in a “holster” over my bench
with a pocket drill chucked in it. That was fast.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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InstantSiv

129 posts in 281 days


#4 posted 08-30-2014 01:24 AM

I have the db110 which is the $800 older version. I drill around 250 pocket holes a week. What takes me no more than 20-30 minutes was taking me 3-4 hours with a jig. If you drill a lot or are getting tired of pocket holes I’d recommend it. I sure as heck won’t look back on my purchase.

As for the quality… I wouldn’t worry about it. I consider myself between a hobbyist and pro and would purchase the foreman if the db110 broke.

-- More is always better. More tools, more power,... oh and more fingers ;)

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Medickep

367 posts in 424 days


#5 posted 08-30-2014 01:30 AM

Thanks instant. I’m leaning towards it and usually when I do, I end up buying it! When I can hide them I prefer pocket holes! Mixed with glue they seem to be awesome strong!

-- Keith

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1979 posts in 1917 days


#6 posted 08-30-2014 02:58 AM

I was at our local Woodcraft store recently and they had one on display. As I passed by, I stopped to “feel” it. It appears the main housing is cast aluminum. It appears to be OK.

Just my opinion but if you drill a lot of pocket holes, it should be considered.

However, mine will drill circles around the Kreg. 50-60 holes in face frame stock in about ten minutes, give or take a few minutes.

It also doubles as a pecan cracker. :-)
http://s226.photobucket.com/user/mt_stringer/media/Kreg%20Jig%20Modifications/2013-12-11214259.mp4.html?sort=3&o=3

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Medickep

367 posts in 424 days


#7 posted 08-30-2014 03:07 AM

That’s pretty awesome! Does the pneumatic part work just for the clp?

-- Keith

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huff

2804 posts in 1971 days


#8 posted 08-30-2014 12:02 PM

Medickap, If you like using pocket screws, then you’ll love the foreman! It makes a simple construction technique so fast and easy you’ll be thinking of all kinds of creative ways of using it and wondering why you didn’t invest in one earlier.

I built mine into it’s own work station so it was flush with the table top and had extension wings built on each side( like for a chop saw). I marked my work top every 6” , both to the right and left of the drill bit. Made spacing pocket holes fast and easy when working with panels.

It may seem like a big investment for a one purpose tool, but I’ve invested a lot more money in tools I’ve used a lot less. Again, it’s not for everyone, but I would guess you would use it and enjoy it.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

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MT_Stringer

1979 posts in 1917 days


#9 posted 08-30-2014 12:42 PM



That s pretty awesome! Does the pneumatic part work just for the clp?

- Medickep


All it does is clamp the board in place. You still have to do the drilling. It can be as fast as your ability and coordination will allow. And not much air required. My little tank had about 90# pressure so I didn’t turn it on. I drilled all of the holes for five face frames (with drawer rails) with the air in the tank.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Medickep

367 posts in 424 days


#10 posted 08-30-2014 12:56 PM

Huff-

I would love to see your foreman setup. It hasn’t been out long, so that’s very impressive you’ve got it in a dialed in setup already!!!

-- Keith

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huff

2804 posts in 1971 days


#11 posted 08-30-2014 02:34 PM

Keith,

The foreman has been out for a few years now and I had mine the last couple years in my business before I retired in 2012.

When I sold all my commercial equipment when I retired, I let that go also, thinking that only doing woodworking as a hobby from now on I won’t really need it or miss it….......WRONG!

There’s three machines I wished I had never parted with (even as a hobbyist) 1. My Powermatic Model 66 table saw (even though it would have been way too big for my home work shop) 2. My ProCut Door Machine, for making raised panel doors and 3. My foreman pocket hole machine.

Sorry I don’t have any pictures, but I set it up a lot like you have your chop saw station. My machine was pneumatic, so I ran a seperate line straight from my compressor to it.

I probably drilled thousands of pocket holes and never had a problem with the machine.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

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Medickep

367 posts in 424 days


#12 posted 08-30-2014 02:53 PM

Huff-

Thanks for the reply. I suppose I was referring to the new one by kreg, which just came out. I’m sure it’s as useful as the old one. Just half the price!

I should of got one before I built this bench! Having the common fence and bench would be nice for larger pieces. But I still have my mini jig for those!

-- Keith

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MT_Stringer

1979 posts in 1917 days


#13 posted 08-30-2014 03:49 PM


Huff-

Thanks for the reply. I suppose I was referring to the new one by kreg, which just came out. I m sure it s as useful as the old one. Just half the price!

I should of got one before I built this bench! Having the common fence and bench would be nice for larger pieces. But I still have my mini jig for those!

- Medickep

Just thinking out loud…
My original pocket hole jig sled had a support on each side of the jig. The whole affair was mounted on a piece of plywood and hung on the wall when not needed. I even added sections of a wooden ruler to help.

BLAH!, you don’t need no stinkin’ ruler. If you drill pocket holes, you will know where they go. When I lay out a piece, whether it is for a face frame or the sides of a cabinet, I quickly make pencil marks about where I want to drill the holes. They are simply a reference. Then, while drilling, if I am off by 1/2 inch, so be it. The project won’t be in jeopardy.

My new version has supports on each side of the jig that may be 8 inches long. I haven’t had any problem positioning various types of material when drilling. And the best part is I don’t have to fiddle with that manual clamp. That is especially true when drilling cabinet carcase sides. No more reaching or scraping my arm trying to reach over or around the work piece to get to the clamp. That would also be true with the Kreg Foreman, I think.

Note: This latest jig also hangs on the wall out of the way when not in use.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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huff

2804 posts in 1971 days


#14 posted 08-30-2014 04:33 PM

Oops; sorry guys, I had the older professional foreman ( I believe it was the DB55).

I just looked up the new one,;looks like a pretty nice set-up. Mike, I also like your set-up. That was always my main complaint with the hand clamp being on the back side with the portable ones. Always a pain when trying to drill panels.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

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MT_Stringer

1979 posts in 1917 days


#15 posted 08-30-2014 09:08 PM

I was drilling some pocket holes today so I decided to video my setup in action. This was my first attempt at being the videographer and actor at the same time. :-)

The noise is the shop vac pulling through the Dust Deputy to evacuate the dust through the port on the jig. I had my air compressor turned off. There was enough pressure in the tank to operate the air cylinder just fine.

http://vid226.photobucket.com/albums/dd265/mt_stringer/Kreg%20Jig%20Modifications/MyKregPocketHoleJigDemo.mp4

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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