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I'm a convert to using a real Dust Collector!

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Forum topic by CharlesA posted 08-29-2014 06:27 PM 1825 views 1 time favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


08-29-2014 06:27 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip dust collection

Soon after I started this phase of woodworking in my life, I started using a 6 hp (right!) shopvac hooked to a Dust Deputy for dust collection. It was a great improvement on no dust collection, and I was generally happy with it. What pushed me to upgrade was my planer—the 2 1/2 inch connector and the cfms of the shopvac were just not working. It would clog at some point, and even when working, 20% of the chips would be strewn to the front and back of the tool.

So . . . I found a ubiquitous HF 2.0HP dust collector on CL for $125 and took the plunge.

-replaced filter bag with 1 micron bag
-bought clear connection bags
-installed pvc duct system with 4” ducts to TS, planer, floor sweep, and bandsaw and 2” to drill press, router table, and miter saw

What I’m impressed with:
1) no strewn chips with planer. Can’t believe it.
2) no spray with miter saw—almost everything picked up. I’m equally stunned.
3) Generally, by the time I get to assembly of a normal project, I have swept up about a 5 gallon bucket-full of chips/dust that have escaped the shopvac/dust deputy. I’m thinking that will be cut by 95%

What I learned:
1) the cost of the dust collector is by no means the only expense in setting up a good system. Just the 7 aluminum blast gates cost over $90 with shipping. I severely underestimated the cost of the whole system.
2) in my garage/shop, I can use the rafters to hold the ducting system. That made it quite easy to use the wye fittings in order to have limited right angles in the ducting.
3) I probably could have looked harder for the PVC sewer fittings, but they were limited enough at the HD that I ended up with schedule 40, for better or worse. Because of using the rafters to hold it, the weight is not a big issue. I used a single machine screw to hold each joint together, and that seems to work quite well. I am in the process of wrapping the joints to limit leaks.
4) I love having the floor sweep.
5) Trying to decide if it is worth replacing the hose from the motor to the filter with pvc.
6) After I empty the bag the first time, I’ll consider doing a Thien baffle.

Here are a few pics of my ducting (with other things stuff in the rafters as well!

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


28 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1883 posts in 1179 days


#1 posted 08-29-2014 06:47 PM

Congratulations! As for point #1: a lot of folks have run into the same learning, the cost of the DC is only the beginning. A warning on point #4: floor sweeps are great, but sometimes unexpected things get to the impeller, that’s why some kind of separator can be a good idea. You can wrap the joints, but it might be easier to apply silicone. With the exception of foil tape, everything I’ve ever used as a wrap came off within a year or 2. Regardless, glad you’ve got set up and running….I think the biggest hurdle a lot of folks face is spending “tool money” on something that doesn’t actually do something to the wood.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#2 posted 08-29-2014 06:49 PM

I’m wrapping them with foil tape—I have all the joints done that I don’t need a ladder to reach. I put a metal screen and rare earth magnets on the floor sweep to avoid too much trouble.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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joshuam39

60 posts in 68 days


#3 posted 08-29-2014 06:51 PM

I need to get on a dust collection system for my work area. Cost is factor. It’s good to see what others do on a tight budget. Do you have any pics? Have you done anything for air filtration?

-- Let's go Pens!

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joshuam39

60 posts in 68 days


#4 posted 08-29-2014 06:52 PM

Ah. there’s pics.

-- Let's go Pens!

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CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#5 posted 08-29-2014 07:09 PM

If I had to do it again and planned further ahead, I would use the PVC sewer pipe and order any fittings I couldn’t easily find. I got fooled by the fact that HD has fittings online that they don’t have in my local store, and I was ready to get it done over the weekend. That would have saved some $’s. Also, although I only use the flex hoses at the very end of the runs, it is dang expensive. I picked up some at a local store, got it home, and realized it was the stuff that likes to stay retracted and is a pain to work with. I found some powertec 4” hose on Amazon that balances good quality and price, but still not cheap. I was able to re-purpose 2 1/2” hose I already have for those connections.

Another note: I read all the research I could find and decided not to run grounding wire through the ductwork.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#6 posted 08-29-2014 07:12 PM

The bottom piece of PVC on those pics is confusing—that’s just leftover that is sitting up there.

In the first pic you can see how I was trying to use the wye’s for 45° degree angles. So for the miter saw I attached a wye right after the wye for the bandsaw, making a 90° in the end.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Crank50's profile

Crank50

100 posts in 262 days


#7 posted 08-29-2014 07:54 PM

A Thien Baffle will cost you a lot of static pressure and reduce the CFM available.

A simple metal trash can with two duct connections on the lid will catch 90% of the chips and dust and prevent screws and such from going through the fan. There is way less penalty for static pressure loss.

The can I refer to is called a drop out box in environmental control system nomenclature. It is even better if you can locate it near the source; like beside a jointer or table saw, before the vertical duct run. Then it also helps prevent buildup in the ducts.

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CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#8 posted 08-29-2014 08:01 PM

That’s interesting about the baffle. To be honest, I hadn’t looked at it closely enough to have an opinion. I had just read about someone complaining about how much dust got spread in his shop by emptying the collection bag!

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

914 posts in 621 days


#9 posted 08-29-2014 09:54 PM

Good to hear about your switch. I did the same about a month ago, except no ducting yet for me because my shop is too mobile. I did buy the infamous HF 2HP dust collector though. Big difference. I run mine outside, so I’m not too concerned about the fine dust.

The price of setting up a thien baffle on a HF dust collector was staggering to me. I was planning to do a thien baffle, but when I worked it all out, it would have been about $700!! And that is without permanent ducting! I decided to go with the temporary fix and just get the DC and the bare minimum fittings, about $200 total. Still makes a huge difference. Once I get the permanent shop set up, I will probably just go ahead and go with an all in one cyclone system. The thien baffle killing the static pressure really scared me off. I think something that is all built as one unit to handle its own static drop, such as an oneida cyclone or a Clearvue will be a better deal in the long run. Those are built with impellers to handle the static loss they produce, which seems more calculated and likely more efficient than a homemade thien. Though I don’t have anything against a thien on a HF DC, I decided it wasn’t for me. Think through that decision before you make it. If your static loss is too high, you are going to be back at square one, collecting 80% of your chips.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

822 posts in 110 days


#10 posted 08-30-2014 01:10 PM

It seems dust collection just never was a priority but I finally broke down, like you, and decided it was time to do something about it.

Great job piping up a system. I am working on a similar project for dust collection, including the Thien Cyclone design but I will not be ducting the garage. I will just have to live with moving the whole DC cart to the tools. I do not have any rafter space.

I am using Wynn Environmentals 0.5 micron filter, as well. I also modified the original design to improve flow and reduce drag by moving the motor so that it is in direct line with the filter inlet.

I hope my system turns out half as nice as yours. Like you said, I spent more on hosing, clamps, vacuum ports, elbows, blastgates, and fittings than on the actual DC. The accessory kit from HF is well worth the purchase price.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View CharlesA's profile (online now)

CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#11 posted 08-30-2014 03:02 PM

A couple of other notes:
1) Although I complained about cost, I did spring for the WoodRiver 110v remote switch. That has been great! Since I have this in a stationary position in the far corner of the shop, going over to turn it on would be a pain.
2) I thought the 2 1/2” connection on my Ridgid 12” miter saw was not designed well. Now I know I just didn’t have enough cfms to make it efficient.
3) on the floor sweep: I was planning on taping it to the floor with two sided tape. However, for the last 12” of ducting I used the semi-rigid hose that keeps its shape. That holds the floor sweep snug enough to the floor to make it work and I can easily remove it if necessary.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#12 posted 08-31-2014 11:32 PM

Another note: I decided I had left the ducting too short to the Table saw, and did a 22 1/2° degree angle and piece of pipe to the floor and used two 90° angles to go around the router table, and then another piece of pipe to get close to the table saw. I decided to use a rubber flex connection and try the sewer pipe this time. I’d definitely use it if I had to do it again, this time using 3” sewer pipe where I’m using 2” schedule 40 and then use a rubber flex coupler to the blast gate. Oh well . . . live and learn.

Charles

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11226 posts in 1376 days


#13 posted 09-01-2014 12:34 AM

Charles, The shop made chip separator I made is probably my best project! It did not decrease my air flow at all and takes seconds to empty as opposed to emptying the clear bag on the DC.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#14 posted 09-01-2014 12:40 AM

Just looked up your separator project. Make sure I understand:
1) barrel
2) lid-sized piece of engineered wood
3) box on top, two holes in lid, separator in box that extends below the lid (figuratively)
4) hose in each end of the box.
5) small lid on box.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11226 posts in 1376 days


#15 posted 09-01-2014 01:42 AM

The box has a Plexiglas lid attached to the box with screws so I can see when the barrel needs emptied. Box divider hangs about 8” into the barrel. Underside of lid has a rabbet to fit on the barrel top. Lid just sits on the barrel and I used floor underlayment/contact cement to make the lid seal to the barrel top. Looked too simple to work but I really like mine. Note that I used 45 degree angles rather than 90s as they restrict flow much less.

Got the idea from an old Shopnotes Mag

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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