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Forum topic by jmcwws posted 08-27-2014 05:36 PM 1493 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jmcwws

8 posts in 828 days


08-27-2014 05:36 PM

1st as to not be rude, I would like to say hello and thank you for being here to help those in need. (i.e. Me):)

I will try to make this short. I have been a wood worker for many years, but I just tried my hand at a timber frame front porch on my house. We choose cypress as a material for it’s durability to weather and harsh sun. Posts are 6×6, with 4×8 cross members and they are true timers so they are true to size. When purchasing from the timber yard I expressed my wants to keep the beautiful woods natural color and to keep it from turning silver on me. “No problem, there are lots of products out there for that” is the answer I got. Well I am to that time where it is up and I would like to finish it before I lay the purple heart decking. A quick call back to the timber yard to inquire of their recommendation for a product and I received the dead opposite answer. “It wants to turn silver naturally, so I would just let that happen”. I refuse! Or do I? That is the question for you guys. The wood is blond/yellow with orangeish grain pattern which I’m sure you all know, but that is the look I would like to keep. I know of Danish oils, Tung oil, polyurethane and a few water based clear coats, but have no idea if any of these are actually going to work. In researching, most say don’t try because of the maintenance to keep it that way of sanding and re-coating on a yearly basis. There are some products that claim to not be a “top coat” such as Timbertect Plus made for the UK. I may have even read about that on this forum. It’s not readily available here and I think the alternative was Kwik Poly which I think is more like a bar top coating epoxy. I thought I had figured it out and would use Waterlox so I made a phone call to them. I don’t have too much nice to say about that conversation. Let’s just say it ended with the tech telling me maybe there is a good reason there is not timber framing in my city. (rudely)

I’m hoping there is someone here that has a tried and true product that will last more than a year.

Thank you in advance,
Jody


14 replies so far

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2603 days


#1 posted 08-27-2014 06:46 PM

Jody, the question is how much sun will it be getting? Polyurethane is an interior product, I have used it on tongue and groove ceilings and it works fine, no sun hits it. A spar Urethane will work on exterior projects, but as you have heard, you need to sand and re-finish often. An offbeat approach I have tried is Sherwin-Williams Resilience paint in the Ultra deep base variety with no tint. It goes on milky and dries clear, as a paint it has UV protection and can last longer than a year. I say it can last longer than a year because I’ve tried it on two projects, a corner table on our screen porch, and a small gate for a customer right on the beach. The table still looks great, and water still beads on it after 2 1/2 years, but the gate, well, I had to sand all that stuff off after a year and a half, replace some of the parts and it is now natural.

There’s some ideas for you, and as I asked at the beginning, how much sun?

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

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jmcwws

8 posts in 828 days


#2 posted 08-27-2014 07:48 PM

Thank you for the reply Nailbanger2. To answer your question… let’s see….......um All day, every day, unless it’s thunder-storming.:) I do have a Sherwin-Williams near by, but I used their pre-cat lacquer a couple of times on furniture pieces and did not care for it. I guess everyone deserves a second chance, so I will go talk to someone there as well as the people I get my regular finish from.

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Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#3 posted 08-27-2014 07:49 PM

West System 3 is the toughest outdoor finish I have
heard of.

You’re in for ongoing maintenance no matter what
you choose.

One almost perverse alternative is to paint the work
and faux finish/grain it to look like the way you
want the wood to look.

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jmcwws

8 posts in 828 days


#4 posted 08-27-2014 09:54 PM

Hello Loren, TY for the reply. I searched this on the net and found that “West system” and “System 3” are two different brands of epoxy resin. Can you tell me which you used as one is a 2:1 and another is 5:1. Wondering if it covers a general sqft and if you happen to use it on something that was already vertical?

Cheers,
Jody

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Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#5 posted 08-27-2014 10:29 PM

I’ve never used it. Boat finishers use it. It was one company
when I first heard about it I think.

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2657 posts in 2644 days


#6 posted 08-27-2014 10:46 PM

I’d guess that a penetrating oil deck finish would be the best option, as any film finish will degrade in the sun/weather eventually (except for the best of marine varnishes, maybe).

-- Allen, Colorado

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2319 days


#7 posted 08-27-2014 11:12 PM

You might want to try One Time Wood Protector. I’ve never used it but have heard good things about it from people who have…

Good Luck!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1821 days


#8 posted 08-27-2014 11:34 PM

Behr solid exterior stain is the most protective, but will cover the grain. Maybe there’s a shade close to natural. For an unpigmented finish, I’d use raw tung oil, but that would have to be redone every few years.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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jmcwws

8 posts in 828 days


#9 posted 08-28-2014 05:28 PM

Thank you all for the advice. HerbC, I went to my local Woodcraft and picked up a gallon and then called the tech support. It sounds like a great product, one of those “too good to be true” sort of products and there are quite a few negative reviews, but I feel like they could have done something improper in applying in most of those cases. I have a few emails floating out there to people who have experience with it and I will wait before aping until I hear back.

Hopefully this works and I will report back my thoughts or what I hear from other users.

Jody

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jmcwws

8 posts in 828 days


#10 posted 08-29-2014 11:41 AM

I had a real nice conversation with a guy yesterday that is unaffiliated with the One Time company, that claims it is the best stuff on the market. I will be using the “natural” and he expected it to real world last about 4 seasons in sun and heat here in Sunny Hot Florida. It’s expensive at about $85 per gallon and it doesn’t spread a long way, but if it actually gets 4 years before recoat, that will be well worth the money. Plus, you just re-apply with not stripping or sanding. I will post a picture once I have it coated. Again, thank you all for the help and maybe my results will be helpful in the future.

Jody

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2603 days


#11 posted 08-29-2014 07:55 PM

That’s great to hear, Jody. The porch is looking good, make sure you get back to us in about two years and give us a review. I saw sunny Florida and had to check where you were. Jax is hot, for sure. Good luck, buddy!

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

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jmcwws

8 posts in 828 days


#12 posted 07-29-2015 12:48 PM

Hello again,

It’s been almost a year since I put the finish on the frame structure of this project and I have to say the “One Time” product turned out to be great on the vertical parts. Not what I would use on flat surfaces. However, now I have a new issue and that is the flat surface.

While building this front porch, I came across a sale on Purpleheart decking. This was not kiln dried furniture grade, but still beautiful. I understood that over time this wood would turn dark with an oil treatment. I should say at this time, I am in, holy crap sunny HOT Florida! Porch gets almost all day sun.

As you can see from the above picture, after only 6-7 months, my beautiful wood did not turn into a beautiful dark color. The 2 grayish boards on each step are the purple heart ones that I have yet to be sanded back down. The top deck was sanded today. I originally treated this with Messmer’s oil for Brazilian hardwood and obviously, I am reluctant to use it again.

So, I’m wondering if a paste wax would be a bad idea for exterior wood?

Just for fun, I decided to rub a little Johnson’s paste wax on a spare piece and it looked amazing. My thought is, with the hot, hot sun all day, that the wax would just continue to sink into the wood. Would it have any UV protection? The Messmer’s just seemed to evaporate out of it.

It seems like wax would repel water as well as an oil, but if it doesn’t work, it’s probably not going to be as easy to get rid of.

Thoughts please!

Thank you for your opinions, they are greatly appreciated and respected.

Jody

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2319 days


#13 posted 07-29-2015 01:06 PM

First of all, I’m glad to hear that the One Time finish is working out for the cypress framework…

Not sure what you can do about the decking…

Good luck and keep us updated on things as time goes on.

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7472 posts in 1467 days


#14 posted 07-29-2015 01:55 PM

I haven’t got any better ideas for what to use for the re-do, but the first thing that came to my mind is … If you use paste wax, when it gets wet it might just make for a VERY slippery surface.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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