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just got an older model craftsman jointer/planer

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Forum topic by WWilder posted 02-02-2009 10:16 PM 21304 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WWilder

31 posts in 2988 days


02-02-2009 10:16 PM

My boss had an old craftsman jointer/planer model # 113 206931. It is in kinda rough shape. Is it worth putting the money into this one to refurb it or is it better to just buy a new table top planer. I am on a budget as most are now adays. Any recommendations on the replacement blades? It is a 6 1/2 in model. The feed table is not in bad shape. The motor needs mounted again (not sure exact place for it yet) and it is a bit rusty. It powers up and the blade assy does rotate. The belt slips off so as i said i do need to remount it to support the pulleys to move properly. Any advice on this machine will be appreciated

-- my mind is constantly racing..... but it hasnt came in 1st place yet


15 replies so far

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marcb

768 posts in 3133 days


#1 posted 02-02-2009 11:18 PM

I would replace the bearings on both the machine and the motor, buff the rust off and get to work.

With some pics I can probaby give you a hand, heres one of my jointer. Its a King-Seeley but a lot of the 113’s just copied the 103 design.

From jointer

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marcb

768 posts in 3133 days


#2 posted 02-02-2009 11:23 PM

For blades, I buy mine from here:
http://www.holbren.com/home.php?cat=661

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marcb

768 posts in 3133 days


#3 posted 02-02-2009 11:36 PM

I should have just done 1 big post, but here you go:

All in, 2 rattle cans of blue Ace brand paint, 1 rattle can of Ace Rust Stop primer, 25 Bucks

2 6202-58LL Double sealed bearings
2 Motor bearings I think it ran be about 20 bucks total shipped.

Accuratebearings.com call them and ask for Lynn

V-Belt 10.00
Wire 20.00 ( I simply received the motor, no wiring to the switch or plug)
Switch 13.00
Blades 14.00

So for about 100 bucks I have a great 6” jointer. Always assume new bearings when buying used tools. The paint job is optional depending on the condition of the tool.

This thing is completely different than a new table top jointer, no matter what “HP” ratings they give those little things. I could barely lift this thing onto the stand without the fence.

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WWilder

31 posts in 2988 days


#4 posted 02-03-2009 12:31 AM

Yeah this thing is a heavy beast. I pulled the motor already from the stand. In the process of wire wheeling the stand. The motor is very heavy. My boss loves to “Tim the Toolman Taylor” stuff so not sure if is original or not. It is not a flimsy motor for sure….. extremely heavy. Good call on the bearing replacements. I will round up a camera and take some snap shots of the full monty tomorrow. Craftsman has replacement blades for this unit but i am not sure if is individual or set of 3. I am going to get the replacement knobs and the manual to get a good start on it. I guess refurb is better idea as i will have a more solid machine. I havent used one of these combo (jointer/planer) so the manual will be smart so i can learn the machine. My friend gave me a craftsman 10” radial saw and after the replacement parts from the recall i got, its good as new. Thanks for the help Marcb

-- my mind is constantly racing..... but it hasnt came in 1st place yet

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marcb

768 posts in 3133 days


#5 posted 02-03-2009 01:08 AM

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WWilder

31 posts in 2988 days


#6 posted 02-03-2009 01:33 AM

You are the man! Perfect! Thanks alot…..again Marcb

-- my mind is constantly racing..... but it hasnt came in 1st place yet

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Bill White

4448 posts in 3420 days


#7 posted 02-03-2009 04:08 PM

Just watch those fingers…...
RAS and jointers love ‘em.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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marcb

768 posts in 3133 days


#8 posted 02-03-2009 07:29 PM

I have 1 solid rule about safety in my shop. I’ve on occasion skipped safety glasses, and I’ve worked at weird angles on a ladder which put me off balance, and while I’m not happy I was stupid and did those things I have never broken rule No 1.

Fingers don’t go near or over anything that spins. Even if I’m cutting a slot down the center of a board on the router table my fingers never go near (withing 3-4 inches) the bit.

Its easy to try to lax that rule on a non thru cut. But think about how fast those kickback demos happen. Where do you want your fingers to be if the board suddenly moves at 100 miles an hour and you’re hovering over a sharp cutting head.

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WWilder

31 posts in 2988 days


#9 posted 02-03-2009 10:29 PM

Safety 1st for sure. Good to have it reinforced also

-- my mind is constantly racing..... but it hasnt came in 1st place yet

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Janaco

2 posts in 1500 days


#10 posted 10-24-2012 08:14 PM

If either one of you are around… thanks; going out to grab a Craftsman of the same make & model. This chat really helped me; the manual link as well. -Super Cool

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dorse72

1 post in 1956 days


#11 posted 02-15-2013 02:28 AM

crazy, I just bought an old 6” King Seeley jointer on Craigs List here in Dallas. I need to do the EXACT thing the MarcB was talking about, problem is I have no clue how to do this.

MarcB – can you walk me through how you did this? I love your stand and am going to try and copy it. this old jointer has so much character and is SOLID. just needs some TLC. please email if you can or anyone else that knows how.

I need – new bearings prob, sharpen knives, or new knives – and a switch put on it.

thanks,
eric

dorse72@gmail.com

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6PTsocket

17 posts in 484 days


#12 posted 11-05-2016 04:30 PM

In woodworking terminology, a jointer and a planer are two entirely different devices. They do make combo units that like “Transformers” can convert from one function to the other. They cost over $1000 and not that common. That is not what you have. It is just a jointer. There are many used parts for this model and similar ones on eBay. If you don’t see what today it may show up later. I have the smaller 4 3/8” version and the cast part that holds the fence had cracked. I found the part on eBay. As others have pointed out. some parts are generic and available from many sources. Sears is of little use for old tool parts. In fact they are of little use on their current tools. At work, I had a Craftsman tool cabinet and needed a new lock cylinder and giving them every number on the box they could not find a currently sold model. We ended up bypassing Sears and calling the actual manufacturer, Waterloo. They immediately had the right part. Now that all their stuff comes from China, their always poor parts support is probably totally down the drain. They are nice solid jointers and worth rebuilding. Mine is from 1957 and the sealed bearings were fine. Clean out the gunk before writing yours off

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 945 days


#13 posted 11-05-2016 05:11 PM

I’ve heard it called and seen it listed as a “jointer planer” as opposed to a “thickness planer”.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Loren

8294 posts in 3107 days


#14 posted 11-05-2016 05:14 PM

Put the motor on a hinged board so the motor
pulls down on the belt. That will prevent the
belt from jumping off.

I’ve never replaced bearings on a machine. I
usually sell them and upgrade before I’ve had
them more than a few years. Refurbishing machines
is a whole area of woodworking that can be
fun, but it’s not working wood… so I just work
on them enough to get them working correctly
and move on.

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runswithscissors

2175 posts in 1484 days


#15 posted 11-06-2016 07:55 AM

WWilder: Though Sears has always called those jointer/planers, they are not a combination machine. They are just a jointer. My dad had one for years, and liked it a lot. You’re much better off with that one than any bench top.

As has been mentioned in many threads, when it comes to bearings, pulleys, and belts, don’t bother with the OEM. They charge higher prices, and often don’t even have what you need. Parts like that are standard, off the shelf items, and can be found at any well stocked hardware store, or better yet, a bearing supply house. Google “bearings.”

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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