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Realistic limitations of Laguna 14-12

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Forum topic by giser3546 posted 08-21-2014 03:05 PM 1805 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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giser3546

179 posts in 1256 days


08-21-2014 03:05 PM

Several months ago I invested in a Laguna 14-12 and have been very happy with it for the most part. Recently I have come across a few large oak logs I am hoping to mill myself. After being continuously disappointed with the Laguna blades I considered getting the Laguna resaw king carbide tipped blades but have settled on the wood slicer from highland woodworking. The resaw king is supposedly the best blade for resawing but its price ($150+) has convinced me to try the $40 woodslicer first. The wood slicer may not be carbide but has gotten some pretty impressive reviews regarding the speed of cut and longevity considering the price. Once I get the blade I hope to do a good bit of milling on my 1.75 hp Laguna band saw, but am wondering where my realistic limitations lie as far as thickness of the resaw. The saw has a 16” resaw capacity but if I’ve learned anything its that the capacity is usually optimistic to say the least. I’ve sawed red oak as thick as 6” and cherry as thick as 5”, and that seems moderately easy even with the disappointing blades. Has anyone had experience with the Resaw king, or the wood slicer on a saw with comparable power? Would the resaw king give me significant performance enhancement, even to the point of coming close to the saw’s capacity?

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"


12 replies so far

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Wildwood

2156 posts in 1918 days


#1 posted 08-21-2014 10:08 PM

Many years ago on another forum guy was told by representative from Suffolk machinery makers of Timber Wolf silicon & carbide blades expect about 200 BDFT blade life resawing wood. Now do not remember if blade was silicon or carbide.

Wood Slicer & Timber Wolf resaw blades have a great reputation so would be surprised if not satisfied. If not mistaken Wood Slicer blade thinner than Timber Wolf blades silicon blades & normal carbon steel flex back blades.

If you did a lot of resawing dense exotic hardwood carbide blades might be a better option if had a bigger bandsaw. Explanation by Mark Duginske in his Band Saw Book makes sense. Wheels on a 14” bandsaw and thickness (.035) will shorten the carbide blade life. He recommended not putting more than .025 thick blades on a 14” bandsaw. I often wondered about Timber Wolf carbide .032 width blades but after reading about only 200 BDFT life of their blades never bought one. Not sure if Mark updated information on blade life in latest edition of his book.

So really thing you will be happy with your Wood Slicer blades.

-- Bill

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BobAnderton

239 posts in 2574 days


#2 posted 08-22-2014 12:33 AM

I know it’s not the answer you’re looking for, but I’m going to suggest that you not go that route. I suggest you get yourself a chainsaw and an alaskan chainsaw mill, which is, let’s say $400 for a chainsaw and $200 for a Granberg Mark III mill. Cut boards from your logs where they lay a couple inches thick and air dry them for about 6 months and finish drying them in your attic. Then you can run them over the jointer and get square faces and your bandsaw with a resaw blade will do fine then. The problem with using a resaw blade on a bandsaw to resaw logs is that the resaw blade is designed to cut a very narrow kerf in square stable dry wood. You try to cut a log that doesn’t sit flat on the table and is wet inside and your bandsaw will have a very difficult time with all the friction between the blade and the narrow kerf in wet wood. In addition, as the log shifts even slightly as you move it along on the table the blade has to follow its own kerf and will start running in a path that isn’t perfectly vertical. You can fix the log in a sled and run that through the bandsaw and it addresses the shifting problem but not the wet wood issue. I started out milling logs the way you’re thinking about and I’ve experienced these problems. I spent pretty much an entire weekend cutting up a couple of maple logs with a bandsaw. Not the way to go in my opinion. Hard on you and hard on the bandsaw. If you’re sure you want to use your bandsaw to mill logs I’d go with the woodturner’s blade that Highland sells. It’s designed to cut a very wide kerf in wet wood.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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giser3546

179 posts in 1256 days


#3 posted 08-22-2014 02:24 AM

I had considered using a chainsaw mill but was told I needed a 70 to 90 cc chainsaw which would have set me back close to grand by itself. Also I’m a little confused about the larger kerf point. Wouldn’t smaller kerf take less power to remove and leave you with more wood to work with? I do think I plan on getting some kind of chainsaw mill but right now the logs I plan on milling are pretty small, only about 10”. I was mostly wondering how much bigger I could realistically go before investing in a mill of some kind.

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"

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BobAnderton

239 posts in 2574 days


#4 posted 08-22-2014 03:00 AM

I use a 60cc saw and it gets through everything fine, just not as fast as a larger saw. I think it was $450. I use bars ranging from 24” to 32” when milling. Buy a box of a dozen chainsaw files and use a sharp chain and that helps a lot. I found a 35cc homeowner type saw to not be suitable. I go the chainsaw route if I want to dry boards. I use a bandsaw on wet wood logs if I just want to make pieces to dry for lathe turning though.
Bandsawing, you’re right that if all else were equal a narrow kerf takes less horsepower to cut than a wider kerf, but when cutting a log freehand I found that I was getting a lot of drag on the blade just from the blade tracking off vertical inside the log with a thin resaw blade. I often use a woodturner’s blade to cut 10” diam logs lengthwise and don’t have much trouble with my saw, which is a 2hp. Something about that size I’ll cut it down the middle, and then lay that cut side down and cut the two sides off, and then flip it 90 degrees and cut the last surface and dry that 4×4 or whatever it comes out to for turning. It’s real fast. Zip zip zip. Cut pieces so they don’t contain the pith. I would also mention that oak is one of the more challenging woods to dry crack-free. The safe moisture removal rate for oak is pretty low for anything more than an inch thick so you’ll want to make sure it dries slow.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1331 days


#5 posted 08-22-2014 11:16 AM

I have a MM16, and once tried to mill a log. The thing was so heavy I had to have a helper, and made a jig to keep the log from turning while in the cut, I used the carbide tipped blade and got through it, but a bandsaw is NO bandmill. Will never do that again. Instead, I bought a small used bandmill, and cut piles of lumber. I have a farm and lots of trees, no need to buy boards, so it is practical for me. If you don’t have all the trees you would want to saw, why not find someone with a bandmill to saw the log for you?

-- Jim from Kansas

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Wildwood

2156 posts in 1918 days


#6 posted 08-22-2014 02:24 PM

Giser3546, after reading Bob’s post when and looked up Wood Slicer blades. “Due to the blades’ minimal set the Wood Slicer® is not recommended for cutting green wood or curves.”

Bob is right Highland should have tried to sell you a Lenox Tri Master ½” or ¾” blade. A ½” Tri Master blade for my BS 93 ½ would run $137 without shipping. I would prefer that over a Resaw King blade, looking specs for both blades.

A Timber Wolf blade would be a better choice than Wood Slicer blade. Unless Resaw King goes on sale would get a Timber Wolf Blade think they are about the same in quality. I would Drop blade width to ½”. Their ½” x 3AS, 163”, 3 TPI blade for 14” BS designed for roughing, milling green wood logs & bowl blanks run $32.38 per blade.

http://timberwolfblades.com/Blade-Selector.php#cut

If do not want to go the chain saw route consider buying a used band saw or inexpensive Harbor Freight BS and make homemade mill in the link;

http://woodgears.ca/bandmill/index.html

Like Jim says finding someone with a bandsaw mill, or sawmill lot cheaper and less headaches.

-- Bill

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giser3546

179 posts in 1256 days


#7 posted 08-22-2014 03:17 PM

I have an old 14” aluminum wheel BS that I got of craigs list for $100. I hate the freaking thing and spent way too much trying to get it to perform at all. Ended up getting so fed up with it I threw it in the corner and went straight to woodcraft and bought the Laguna. Its only a 1/2 hp and has blade drift so bad its almost impossible to use.

I do not live on a farm, my 1/4 acre suburban lot is exactly why I’m having such a hard time finding someone with a band mill to do the work for me. Everyone I can find lives 1 hour or more driving distance away, making the gas getting there and back a cost issue.

I do plan on getting a simple chainsaw mill at some point but currently will probably just get the most robust bs blade I can find to take the small 8” to 10” logs I’d like to mill along with the resawing I do pretty regularly. Which probably would be the timberwolf.

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"

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BobAnderton

239 posts in 2574 days


#8 posted 08-22-2014 06:04 PM

Here’s a link to the woodturner's blade. Runs about $23 for the length I use. Designed for cutting wet wood.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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Manitario

2507 posts in 2667 days


#9 posted 08-22-2014 06:18 PM

It is difficult to resaw wide, dry wood that is already squared; you will find resawing wet, heavy, irregular logs extremely difficult, regardless of what blade you use. Several attempts on my 14” 1.75hp bandsaw with a new 3/4” woodslicer blade proved difficult to impossible on a few large logs.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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Joseph Jossem

492 posts in 2052 days


#10 posted 08-22-2014 06:49 PM

The 16” throat at 1.75hp will struggle at full size cut.

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giser3546

179 posts in 1256 days


#11 posted 08-22-2014 07:55 PM

Just to be clear, I’ve milled small logs before with a simple plywood jig and crappy blade. It wasn’t easy but very doable. I was mostly wondering how big I should be willing to mill knowing that the saws capacity is probably unlikely, and what blade would make it the easiest. I’m not worried about a little or a lot of work, part of the fun of woodworking is the physical act of doing it.


Here s a link to the woodturner s blade. Runs about $23 for the length I use. Designed for cutting wet wood.

- BobAnderton

I appreciate the input bob, the wood turners blade specifically set up for green wood sounds promising. I have heard that milling wood as soon as its felled will speed up the drying process, but the logs I use are commonly left to sit unmilled for several months to a year. Despite the slowed drying due to remaining whole, how long could the logs sit and still be considered green?

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"

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BobAnderton

239 posts in 2574 days


#12 posted 08-22-2014 10:31 PM

A log with bark will stay pretty wet in the center for several years far from the cut ends, but the outside will be drying and shrinking and cracking. A log with the center in it will generally crack before it gets dry. The quality (color/brightness) will degrade after a few weeks and you’ll start to see checking of the outside of an oak log after a few months. I mill as soon as I can get it, but I understand sometimes it’s old when you get it. If you can get it freshly felled put anchorseal on the cut ends to prevent end-checking. Same day you fell it if possible. If you’re bandsawing a log freehand consider snapping a chalk line on it. It’s amazing how much that visual reference helps to make a straight cut.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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