LumberJocks

tung oil

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by jeffswildwood posted 08-21-2014 12:46 AM 1926 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1328 posts in 1441 days


08-21-2014 12:46 AM

Just bought my first bottle of tung oil. I have read many of you use it but also have “special mixes”. I tried a sample on some walnut and first coat look really nice. Right from the can. My question? Can it be mixed with polyurethane and what would be the advantage, if any. Can I use something like acetone as a mixer for either the tung and/or the polyurethane as a mixing, thinning agent. Maby just with the poly to make a wipe on. Or just leave the tung oil alone and just use it. Very basic questions but inquiring minds want to know.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".


17 replies so far

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1824 days


#1 posted 08-21-2014 01:07 AM

A little goes a long way.
Raw tung oil takes a week+ to cure.
May be thinned with mineral spirits or naphtha.
Wipe it on and wipe it all off.
No advantage to mixing with poly; it’ll just reduce the percentage of urethane, the most important component.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View richardwootton's profile

richardwootton

1699 posts in 1419 days


#2 posted 08-21-2014 01:07 AM

Is this the Minwax Tung oil, or pure Tung oil?

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1328 posts in 1441 days


#3 posted 08-21-2014 02:00 AM

formbys tung oil.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1957 days


#4 posted 08-21-2014 12:10 PM

Formby’s tung oil really isn’t “tung oil”....it’s just a very thin varnish, AKA wiping varnish. So adding more varnish to it (guessing that’s what you mean by “polyurethane”) won’t do anything but make it build a little quicker. If you look at the MSDS, it shows Formby’s to be almost 78% mineral spirits….so I certainly wouldn’t add more thinner. Consider making your own by thinning any varnish by about 50%, and try it. In the meantime if you like the look of the Formby’s, by all means use it. It won’t have a very thick film, so in areas subject to high wear you might want to add a coat or two of brushed varnish.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1328 posts in 1441 days


#5 posted 08-21-2014 12:43 PM

Thanks guys, I’ve used polyurethane for years with good results but it always seemed “thick”. I was looking for something to bring out the natural beauty of the wood and retain the smoothness without a yellowing. Looks nice on walnut but with poplar I do see a color change, didn’t stay white. Suggestions?

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".

View danoaz's profile

danoaz

220 posts in 1633 days


#6 posted 08-21-2014 12:51 PM

I am the type that likes the natural look of any wood and so I typically use pure tong oil or linseed oil on cedar and oak, cherry, etc. Here in Phoenix with everything so dry I do a 50/50 mix with low-odor mineral spirits and wipe it on with a foam brush or cloth. I let it soak in a good 30 minutes and gently wipe off. You really don’t want any to stand too long or it will get sticky and become a problem coating. I do this at least three to four times depending on the wood with 24 hours between coats. After that I may or may not put on a urethane sealer depending on where it is going and what it is used for. I find the pour oil is too thick and you end up wipe most of it off if you don’t thin it. Tong oil is a favorite of mine if you haven’t guessed.

-- "Simplicity and repose are the qualities that measure the true value of any work of art." Frank LLoyd Wright

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1328 posts in 1441 days


#7 posted 08-21-2014 04:11 PM

So allow the tung oil to dry and season and follow with a coat of polyurethane? I will try this on some scrap and see what happens.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1957 days


#8 posted 08-21-2014 05:10 PM

Varnish is a compound of a drying oil and resin cooked together. Most of them use linseed oil, and that is a big contributor to the yellowing you see. It’s my opinion that the urethane resins also lend a “plastic’ look I don’t like. There is another varnish that doesn’t have the plastic look or the linseed oil: P&L 38. It’s hard to find, but if you can locate it (we don’t have any Pratt and Lambert stores around me) it’s formulated with soya oil and alkyd resins. It’s still has a slight amber cast but hugely less than the linseed oil formulas, and it doesn’t change nearly as much over time. Other options would be shellac (shellac is colorfast, no change at all) or a clear waterborne. Waterbornes can be water clear, which to many is the same problem in the opposite direction. there is also a varnish made with tung oil and phenolic resins (Waterlox original), and it’s the darkest of the varnishes out of the can, AFAIk.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1328 posts in 1441 days


#9 posted 08-22-2014 12:26 AM

I’m on coat three with the formbys and so far I like what I see. I feel the wood but have a nice grain enhancement. I used urethane for years and want to expand my finishing. Finding out the formbys is primary shellac was disheartening but shellac was one of the finishes I wanted to try so not so bad after all. I will try to find P and L 38 (maby amazon) and try it soon. Thanks all for the tips!

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".

View isotope's profile

isotope

146 posts in 1088 days


#10 posted 08-22-2014 01:42 AM

If you are interested in continuing to explore with finishes, Lee Valley tools sells pure Tung Oil and a Polymerized Tung Oil, which will cure/harden much faster than the pure oil. I used this on some hardwood floors and it looks great. It does have an amber color, definitely not clear.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1957 days


#11 posted 08-22-2014 11:32 AM


I used urethane for years and want to expand my finishing. Finding out the formbys is primary shellac was disheartening but shellac was one of the finishes I wanted to try so not so bad after all.
- jeffswildwood

Something was lost in translation….there is no shellac in Formby’s, only varnish and thinner.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3591 days


#12 posted 08-22-2014 09:12 PM



Formby s tung oil really isn t “tung oil”....it s just a very thin varnish, AKA wiping varnish. So adding more varnish to it (guessing that s what you mean by “polyurethane”) won t do anything but make it build a little quicker. If you look at the MSDS, it shows Formby s to be almost 78% mineral spirits….so I certainly wouldn t add more thinner. Consider making your own by thinning any varnish by about 50%, and try it. In the meantime if you like the look of the Formby s, by all means use it. It won t have a very thick film, so in areas subject to high wear you might want to add a coat or two of brushed varnish.

- Fred Hargis

Actually, it’s “Formby’s Tung Oil Finish.” It’s a tung oil/alkyd varnish diluted to a wiping varnish consistency. It shouldn’t be called “tung oil.”

-- 温故知新

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2101 days


#13 posted 08-22-2014 09:27 PM

I’ve got some of the same stuff. Sent my wife to the store said “see if you can find some tung oil”. She came back with the formby’s. I’ve used it on one small project and it was ok.

since then I bought a quart of “Hope brand” pure tung oil from Amazon. Havent used it yet.

-Paul

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1328 posts in 1441 days


#14 posted 08-23-2014 12:05 AM

I’m guessing that formbys is pretty much a wipe on polyurethane? Maby I’m confused, is varnish actually polyurethane? I like the look but I always likeed poly anyways. Now to find some actual tung oil. maby even some boiled linseed oil. I will be coating some 14 year old walnut so I want a great natural look.

Fred, sorry I was mixed up with shellac and varnish, my confusion…

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".

View TigerT's profile

TigerT

2 posts in 860 days


#15 posted 08-23-2014 03:24 AM

I use 100% pure tung oil from Woodcraft, at about $20 per quart. A little goes a very long way and it oxidizes in the bottle, so squeeze the bottle or add marbles before closing to keep oxygen out. One quart lasts me over one year of building small furniture, wall and mantle clocks, music boxes, etc. It is beautiful with walnut or cherry, and gives a nice flat finish with hard maple.

It is rather thick, so I usually dilute it 50/50 with mineral spirits. I rub it onto a smoothly sanded surface (minimum 220) with a wad of XXXX steel wool. Dull spots need more oil, as it has all been absorbed by the wood.

After about 20 to 30 minutes, it will start getting sticky. Wipe it all off with a polishing action with soft, absorbent cotton rags. If it is getting too sticky, quickly rub over the oil with more mineral spirits to slow curing.

It will be dry to touch in an hour or two, won’t collect dust, but has not yet cured. Add more coats at about one day intervals until you like the finish. The finish will be deep but flat. When I prefer a little gloss, I mix about equal parts tung oil, oil based urethane, and mineral spirits for the final coat or so.

The resulting finish is easy, beautiful, and durable, but won’t be fully cured for about a month. It can be handled when dry to the touch, but might stain a carpet or table cloth until fully cured. If any “sweating” should occur while it is curing, just polish it off with a clean rag. The finish is durable, and easily rejuvenated if ever needed by doing one more pass with tung oil and mineral spirits. Do not use household furniture polishes, as they may make the finish turn milky over time.

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com