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Jointer Not Flattening Boards: Need Help!

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Forum topic by ShannonRogers posted 02-02-2009 02:41 AM 15243 views 3 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShannonRogers

540 posts in 3937 days


02-02-2009 02:41 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer coplanar problem alignment

Hey Everyone, I have a Grizzly 6” jointer and it seems that I have always had problems getting my boards completely flat. The jointer behaves like the tables are not coplanar. When I run a board across it and move my pressure to the outfeed table I rarely get the cut to continue across the board to the end. If I keep pressure on the infeed side all the way to the end of the pass, I will get contact throughout. More often than not though I will taper or bi-planar surface.

I got my hands on a 52” Veritas straight edge and some feeler gauges and went to work this weekend thinking I would correct the table misalingment. I have not adjusted anything yet, but the tables are almost dead on. I have a .008 deflection at the far end, but the gap below the straight edge remains inside .004” 24” from the knives.

Is this gap significant enough to cause the problems I am facing? Any other thoughts on how to correct my jointer problem. I know there is some technique to using this machine, but it is not rocket science. I have watched Hendrik Varju’s video and have followed all of his technique advice so I am prone to believe it is not human error (for once).

Shannon

-- The Hand Tool School is Open for Business! Check out my blog and podcast "The Renaissance Woodworker" at www.renaissancewoodworker.com


17 replies so far

View WispWoods's profile

WispWoods

65 posts in 3575 days


#1 posted 02-02-2009 03:01 AM

Could it be that the knives are set too high? There must be an easy way to check this. What method did you use to set the knife height? I’m a big fan of the ruler method, since I’ve never had any luck with the magnetic solutions.

0.008” isn’t alot, but depending upon the depth of cut, it could be enough to cause these issues.

I scored a 3”x3” piece of square aluminun tubing from the scrap bin at my workplace. I used this a bits of paper to setup my joiner. It also works great for flattening plane bottoms. You are very luck to have access to a veritas 52” straightedge.

-- - You begin thinking less, and feeling more.

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3915 days


#2 posted 02-02-2009 03:07 AM

Are the boards warped or cupped? A jointer won’t do much good with warped boards. At least I haven’t had any luck with them. You can build a sled to get them through the planer.
- JJ

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juniorjock

1930 posts in 3915 days


#3 posted 02-02-2009 03:26 AM

I use the same about of pressure on the outfeed as i do the infeed table. I wouldn’t think that you’d need to put more pressure on one side or the other. Maybe the outfeed table just needs adjusting.
- JJ

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juniorjock

1930 posts in 3915 days


#4 posted 02-02-2009 03:28 AM

One more thought…..? How does the jointer do with edge jointing?
- JJ

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27250 posts in 3971 days


#5 posted 02-02-2009 03:36 AM

Shannon I would check the height of the knives as WispWoods suggested. This method works well for me in adjusting their height.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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matt garcia

1901 posts in 3821 days


#6 posted 02-02-2009 03:51 AM

I had that same problem with my Grizzly G0586. It seems when you take it out of the crate, you tend to lift it by the tables, lifting them, and cocking them on the ends. And with the way set screws tightened from the factory, they stay that way. I had to shim my outfeed table at the front of the table, near the cutterhead, because it was high at the end. So far it’s held up with that only adjustment. Mine was also only off a few thousanths. Hope this helps!!

-- Matt Garcia Wannabe Period Furniture Maker, Houston TX

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ShannonRogers

540 posts in 3937 days


#7 posted 02-02-2009 06:41 AM

Thanks everyone. After fiddling for a while in the shop I think there are two issues that taken individually are not that big of a deal. Added together I am getting a bigger problem. Definately the tables are not coplanar as my feeler gauge tells me. Also I think my blades are too low. Since they need to be sharpened anyway, I will fix that part. Any tips for bringing the tables into alignment. I assume I need to loosen the gib screws and shim them. Anyone ever done this? Matt, can you go into more detail on your shimming process?

-- The Hand Tool School is Open for Business! Check out my blog and podcast "The Renaissance Woodworker" at www.renaissancewoodworker.com

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3822 days


#8 posted 02-02-2009 05:30 PM

I consider this the definitive way to set your jointer knives to the same height.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=2983839096587014177&hl=en

View bendisplays's profile

bendisplays

40 posts in 3549 days


#9 posted 02-03-2009 12:54 AM

This is a common problem with joiners. There are many tools out there for setting your knives on your joiner. The previous video is excellent on how to set the knives.

Once set though you have to have the outfeed table match the height of the cut. Noiw you can set the height of the knives to the outfeed table. If you are cutting any depth, the tables should not be at the same height. In any case you want to set the knives with respect to the outfeed table.

If your outfeed table is too high, then it wont cut at the end (like you described) If it is to low it will drop when you are at the end of your part as it goes through the joiner. It will put a “divot” in the part when it drops.

But with all this aside the best way to flatten stock in short dimensions is to do it with a table mounted router and a fence. The fence is set a distance that is about the width that you are going to router (you just take a little off like your joiner). The fence can be something real straight like a bar of aluminum and it can be clamped to the table if your table does not have a fence.

This will parellel the other side of the part you are routering.

Cheers,

Ben

View matt garcia's profile

matt garcia

1901 posts in 3821 days


#10 posted 02-03-2009 05:15 AM

Shannon,

I was instructed by the Grizzly Tech to lift both tables above the cutterhead. Then lay a straight edge across both tables, making sure to bottom it out on the infeed side, in order to determine if the outfeed table is angled down at the end, or up at the end. Once you determine the amount out of co-planer, make a shim exactly half that amount, and install it in the table ways. You will install the shim so that it is visible to you where the table meets the cast iron base that it attached to. You’ll shim it on both sides of the table, on each side of the ways.

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-- Matt Garcia Wannabe Period Furniture Maker, Houston TX

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3915 days


#11 posted 02-03-2009 07:36 PM

I don’t know rick….. I’ve never been able to get a flat edge on a board using the jointer if it’s warped and twisted. You would have to feed the board through the jointer perfectly every time with pressure on just the right spots. If you are able to do it, more power to you. I have a sled and a DW735, and trust me, I don’t have too much time on my hands. Nor do I need you to tell me that. Chill out man.
- JJ

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sidestepmcgee

158 posts in 3874 days


#12 posted 02-04-2009 08:13 PM

I also did not know much about jointers till I joined this website.Seems like I come here to learn and share with fellow woodworkers.Guess If we knew everything about woodworking nobody would be here.I enjoy this site because you dont have to be professional.

-- eric post, tallahassee FL

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3915 days


#13 posted 02-04-2009 09:57 PM

Thanks for the information Rick.
- JJ

View Karson's profile

Karson

35134 posts in 4550 days


#14 posted 02-09-2009 05:21 AM

Flattening a board is easy when the machine is set up. Take out cups, take out twists. You just need to hold the board a couple of times and then it will have a flat spot on two places that will make it easier to get it through every time after that.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Appomattox Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View ShannonRogers's profile

ShannonRogers

540 posts in 3937 days


#15 posted 02-16-2009 01:19 AM

I wanted to post an update. I shimmed the infeed table with a business card and was able to get the tables co-planar. I then removed, sharpened, and re-aligned the knives using the Jointer Pal. The jointer cuts like a dream now. Obviously it has been out of whack since the day I bought it because it has never been so easy to flatten a board before. I’m kicking myself now for not doing this earlier.

As a side note, I filmed the entire process and will be making a podcast of it in the near future. I’ll post the link to it here once I have it up and running. Thanks for everyone’s help!

-- The Hand Tool School is Open for Business! Check out my blog and podcast "The Renaissance Woodworker" at www.renaissancewoodworker.com

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