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Finishing over paint question...

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Forum topic by MattyMattAg posted 08-16-2014 09:19 PM 791 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MattyMattAg

38 posts in 943 days


08-16-2014 09:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finish paint help

I used a semi gloss paint from SW on some game boards I made and am going to finish them with polycrylic for protection.

There are some fibers and fine debris in the paint that I would like to remove before finishing, but I’m worried about lightly sanding prior to application.

When I sanded the earlier coats of paint (4 total coats), the sheen was knocked down and left a cloudy appearance.

My question is… if I sand the final coat of paint where the cloudiness appears and then finish with the poly, will the cloudiness go away and make the game board look good again?

Thanks for the help!!

-- If Jesus was a carpenter, what better profession could there be?


7 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

13434 posts in 1316 days


#1 posted 08-16-2014 09:35 PM

I think you may want to sand the whole thing to help the paint adhere. The finish should have whatever sheen your polycrylic has. Whether or not you sand, I think the sheen of the poly will be what you see.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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endgrainy

237 posts in 1347 days


#2 posted 08-16-2014 09:38 PM

I agree, sand first. If you don’t sand, that debris will look terrible and the surface won’t be flat or smooth. The final sheen will be related to the final coats of clear finish.

I recently painted and then finished with water based poly on my dresser project. I sanded after each coat of paint and the finish came out as hoped.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/104649

-- Follow me on Instagram @endgrainy

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MattyMattAg

38 posts in 943 days


#3 posted 08-16-2014 10:40 PM

Grit suggestion? 220 light enough, or should I bump to 300 or even 400?

-- If Jesus was a carpenter, what better profession could there be?

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SamuraiSaw

513 posts in 1424 days


#4 posted 08-16-2014 10:45 PM

Rule #1…..always test finishes before applying to the final product.

If you don’t sand before applying the clear finish you risk the finish peeling off. Those products require a mechanical bond and that can only be accomplished by scuffing the surface. I would not go any finer than 220.

-- Artisan Woodworks of Texas.... www.awwtx.com

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endgrainy

237 posts in 1347 days


#5 posted 08-16-2014 10:45 PM

I haven’t done a lot with paint, but I typically use 400 grit in between finishing steps (or scotch brite pad.) In my recent experience with paint, I also used 400 grit and it seemed to work well. I feel like 220 ends up taking too much finish away and leaves the surface more rough than I would like.

Edit:I would defer to SamuraiSaw or others with more experience in this area. His point is well taken

-- Follow me on Instagram @endgrainy

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firefighterontheside

13434 posts in 1316 days


#6 posted 08-16-2014 11:07 PM

I would think 220 is fine. Other than those spots with the debris youre just scuffing the paint so go light.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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DaleM

952 posts in 2843 days


#7 posted 08-17-2014 03:14 AM

Since grits over 220 tend to be more expensive, I just take a sheet of 220 and break it down into quarter sheets, then rub the grit side of two quarter sheets together really well to really wear down the paper. It works really well to sand over paint and finishes between coats, but I’m not sure of what the effective grit would be at that point. I did use that to sand latex paint before spraying polycrylic on my windowsill at home and it has held up well to two cats and a dog’s paws for a year so far.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

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