LumberJocks

Planning tear out problem

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 08-14-2014 10:45 PM 1468 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1040 days


08-14-2014 10:45 PM

So I’m in the process of making a cutting board, got it glued up and ran it through the planer to flatten it out and it came out with tons of tear out. I’m using quartersawn cherry and curly maple. One side, now the bottom, has it pretty bad while the other isn’t too bad. What’s the problem, the wood itself, dull blades even though they havent been used much. This is only the second time I’ve used figured wood, can’t remember if I put the last one through the planer or not but there wasn’t any tear out on my last one.


9 replies so far

View Ajs73's profile

Ajs73

134 posts in 981 days


#1 posted 08-14-2014 11:55 PM

Did you try feeding from the other end ? Maybe
real lite passes ? Idk. I’ve had same issue before and
broke out my belt sander (I figured it was the wood,
not sure.) wish I could help !

-- Andy, Alliance,Ohio

View Halc's profile

Halc

130 posts in 1065 days


#2 posted 08-15-2014 12:18 AM

I had the same problem with one I made of hard maple. Fortunately I made it about 1.5” thick, so I built a planer sled for my router and removed almost 1/8” from each side. I then used a random orbit sander to finish it. Since it’s a cutting board, the two sides don’t have to be perfectly flat and the two sides don’t have to be perfectly parallel, just close. Good luck with it.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3151 days


#3 posted 08-15-2014 12:55 AM

Wow, that planer snipe is terrible !
Looks like you have some adjustments to make before you plane anything else that matters to you.
I work with a lot of figured woods and sharp blades along with proper machine set-up is crucial for starters.You can try taking very light cuts after moistening the wood slightly before sending it through the planer.
However, I finally broke down and bought a drum sander to cure the tear-out issues. Saved a lot of money in the end by not wasting the precious figured woods.

How many times do you think the grain changes in this board ? : )
Best wishes !

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13467 posts in 1319 days


#4 posted 08-15-2014 12:59 AM

I had the same problem. Since these rake glued up, one piece has grain running one way and one running the other way. Sharper knives and lighter passes can help, but my next one I have vowed to just use my belt sander.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1040 days


#5 posted 08-15-2014 01:08 AM

Yea I wish I had a drum sander, but even if I had the money for one I wouldn’t have anywhere to put it. The snipe on it actually isn’t that bad just looks it, forgot to pull up on it as it was coming out the first pass. I used a scrap piece to go through first or it would have been bad on the front end.

So you just run a damp cloth on the wood before sending it through or something like mineral oil.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13467 posts in 1319 days


#6 posted 08-15-2014 01:15 AM

Same here, nowhere to put a drum sander.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Robert Tutsky's profile

Robert Tutsky

58 posts in 1513 days


#7 posted 08-15-2014 03:54 PM

I used to rub on some moisture with a cloth dipped in water. Wait 10 minutes or so for the wood to soften the fibers. Be sure to carefully wipe off the moisture from the blades to prevent rust.

-- http://www.benchtopwoodworkingtools.com

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6568 posts in 1613 days


#8 posted 08-15-2014 04:20 PM

Try to wipe it down with a wet rag/sponge before each pass. Send it through at as much of an angle as you can. And you need to lift up on the back end of the board when feeding in and the front of it when coming out to reduce the snipe. That snipe is terrible.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1040 days


#9 posted 08-15-2014 04:41 PM

Will give it a shot on my next one, I’ll just sand the heck out of it for now. Trust me the snipe on it looks worse than it actually is, should sand away easily, if you closed your eyes and ran your hand over it you would barley be able to tell.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com