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Forum topic by Blackie_ posted 08-10-2014 10:41 PM 1052 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackie_

3638 posts in 1258 days


08-10-2014 10:41 PM

OK I’m stepping into new waters, away from my box making into some small tables, I am just now attempting my very first mortise and tenon joints making, attaching the legs to the under skirt so my question is, once I have the legs and skirt joined together what method do I use to attach the skirt and legs to the under side of the table? The table in question is a slab of Mesquite, 1 1/2” thick, to be a small end table.

Thanks.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs


43 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5279 posts in 1323 days


#1 posted 08-10-2014 10:45 PM

To allow for expansion and contraction this method is acceptable:

From woodgears.ca ^

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Jim Jakosh

12328 posts in 1851 days


#2 posted 08-10-2014 10:49 PM

I drill holes into the skirt or apron and screw it right into the top. I plug the holes if they are too close to the edge where some one might feel them. The first note would be great too!! I like it!!
Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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Blackie_

3638 posts in 1258 days


#3 posted 08-10-2014 11:12 PM

Ok yes that looks like a great method., thanks waho and Jim.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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Boxguy

1538 posts in 1013 days


#4 posted 08-10-2014 11:16 PM

Blackie, in place of the mortise joints you might consider this construction technique based on box making ideas. The concept is a faux-mortise and fill in the dado. It is very strong even when you make the cross pieces much smaller. The cross pieces which are lapped in the center and fit into a top dado, act as an I-beam. It is simple to build and keep square. Gluing the plywood in the dado makes a very strong joint indeed. Curving the bottom plywood would give it much more style as would tapering the legs. Slanting the legs is a simple matter of cutting an angle on the ends of the plywood. Decorative wood added to the point where the plywood intersects would add style and strength.

-- Big Al in IN

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Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist

5261 posts in 2054 days


#5 posted 08-10-2014 11:18 PM

Randy, there are numerous ways to do this. for years I have fastening the top to the aprons with pocket hole screws. I just make it a point to enlarge the pocket hole enough to allow for expansion of the top when the screws are inserted. During the many years I have done this I have never had a problem.

Many commercially made table top fastening clips are available from companies like Rockler and Woodcraft and you can also make your own wooden brackets as Waho609 described for fastening the tops. I have bought several of the metal types but I have always found the pocket hole method to be my go to choice

-- Each step of every Wood Art project I design and build is considered my masterpieceā€¦ because I want the finished product to reflect the quality and creativeness of my work

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Blackie_

3638 posts in 1258 days


#6 posted 08-10-2014 11:34 PM

Big Al I’ve already got one of the legs mortised and all of the skirts tenoned as well, I tried researching that Faux method but wasn’t able to find anything?

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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firefighterontheside

5806 posts in 602 days


#7 posted 08-10-2014 11:42 PM

I like to do as Jim mentioned in the center of the slab to keep the top centered and then on the rest I use metal tabs which do the same thing as waho’s method.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7186 posts in 2049 days


#8 posted 08-10-2014 11:52 PM

waho 609 has posted a very good way, what i have done is basically the same thing, except i have cut a dado the length of the skirting and done the same thing except i didnt have small blocks i had a piece the whole length of the skirting, but i think what waho609 has is a very good way .

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

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Blackie_

3638 posts in 1258 days


#9 posted 08-10-2014 11:55 PM

If I’m not mistaking mesquite is pretty stable but I might be wrong.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Tooch's profile

Tooch

694 posts in 622 days


#10 posted 08-11-2014 12:06 AM

Randy, I normally make my own corner brackets by cutting 45’s on a piece of solid hardwood, then attach them using pocket holes. I hide the pocket holes by attaching them upside-down before attaching the top.

this does 2 things- 1. helps to hold the legs & skirts together, and 2. gives me a nice place to screw up from the bottom. side note- I normally leave a small gap (1/32”-1/16”) between the brackets & top, to allow for expansion

You can also do this by cutting long strips, and drilling pocket holes to attach to the side rails, and then screw up from the top.

Here’s an example of an end table using this technique, check out the last picture from the under side

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/84475

-- "Well, the world needs ditch-diggers too..." - Judge Smails

View Roger's profile

Roger

15269 posts in 1550 days


#11 posted 08-11-2014 12:17 AM

waho hit the bingo.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7186 posts in 2049 days


#12 posted 08-11-2014 12:20 AM

randy, here is a table i made a bit ago, if you scroll down into the comments you will see some other pictures i posted of the method i used to hold the tops on, if you drill the holes in the cleats a bit large, it give the top the ability to move for expansion..http://lumberjocks.com/projects/77541

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

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Iwud4u

495 posts in 275 days


#13 posted 08-11-2014 12:25 AM

-- It's far better to be criticized by a wise person than applauded by a fool --

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firefighterontheside

5806 posts in 602 days


#14 posted 08-11-2014 12:28 AM

Iwud4u, that’s what I use. I figure out what height the slot needs to be from the top and set my biscuit cutter to that height and voila.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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grizzman

7186 posts in 2049 days


#15 posted 08-11-2014 12:30 AM

iwud4u, these are great as long as the screw hole is enlarged, otherwise there is no way for the top to move

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

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