LumberJocks

Tomorrow I am buying a table saw. First time using one.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by chetrog posted 08-09-2014 09:28 PM 858 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View chetrog's profile

chetrog

71 posts in 188 days


08-09-2014 09:28 PM

I am buying a table saw tomorrow. I have never used one ever. I have just used my circular saw for everything. I build some speaker boxes, and I can’t wait to see how easier this is going to be :). My question for anyone is, are there any accessories that i should get? I saw there is a magnetic level that would show me the degrees of the blade, that looks cool. I don’t know about jigs, or sleds or anything else i might need. I know the saw comes with a 10” blade. Do you guys know how many teeth the blade i should get . I cut 3/4 MDF a lot. Thanks for any suggestions for a newbie.

-- I had a stroke a few years back, and sometimes the words dont come out as well as I would like.


17 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5567 posts in 2100 days


#1 posted 08-09-2014 10:01 PM

More importantly (IMO), what first table saw are you considering?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Minorhero's profile

Minorhero

282 posts in 1330 days


#2 posted 08-09-2014 10:13 PM

Assuming its a cast iron top, I would get a magnetic featherboard of some flavor. I like the grip-tite personally. http://www.amazon.com/Mesa-Vista-Design-GRIP-TITE-Featherboard/dp/B0000223VF/ref=sr_1_2?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1407622247&sr=1-2&keywords=GRIP-TITE

I also love this magnetic push stick (though some folks prefer to make one) http://www.amazon.com/Rockler-Plastic-Magnetic-Push-Stick/dp/B001DT2ZMI/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1407622304&sr=1-1&keywords=magnetic+push+stick

Make sure you don’t buy a terrible table saw. Its very easy to do that. I suggest you ask around and verify the saw you are buying is actually worth the money you are spending.

View Gentile's profile

Gentile

76 posts in 543 days


#3 posted 08-09-2014 10:36 PM

A table saw is a wonderful thing. I had one I made where I mounted my Skillsaw under an old table. I later upgraded to a couple of used Craftmans
Currently I have a Delta Unisaw, and that’ll be the last one I’ll ever own. It’s great.
Some of the accessories I have for it are.
Dado blade
Cross cut sled
Several blades, ripping and cross cut
A tendoning jig
Push stick(s)
An arbor nut wrench that I keep with the saw so I don’t have to look for a wrench that fits.
A Beisemier type fence (Steel City)
Mounted it on wheels to move around the garage shop
Dust collector mounting hardware
It has a push button switch and I fabricated a paddle type that’s easier to find to switch off
It’s 220v and I made an extension cord for it and other machines
A table saw is a lot like a pick up truck, there’s a bunch of things you can add, to customize it for your needs.

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

View RonTanc's profile

RonTanc

23 posts in 1502 days


#4 posted 08-09-2014 10:48 PM

Chetrog – You’ll find, as you cliimb up the learning curve, the types of gigs and other accessories you might need to make you work easier and more accurate. Most of these accessories you’ll likely build using the new s aw. Enjoy and be safe, this saw can hurt you badly if you’re not careful. Some have learned that lesson the hard way. Good-luck have fun.

-- Cut the hole twice and it's still too big!

View rickf16's profile

rickf16

376 posts in 2306 days


#5 posted 08-09-2014 11:13 PM

Definitely get some safety gear first. Push sticks are a must as Gentile and Minorhero noted. Also, if you’ve never used one before, find some videos on line. I found this video on You Tube that is a good starting point. Good luck and enjoy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WhnZS1p5Qg

Just my two.

-- Rick

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1424 posts in 982 days


#6 posted 08-10-2014 12:39 AM

Major dust collection would be my first addition, good hearing protection, then a Gripper (or similar), and finally add jigs as the need arises. Stay safe!

-- Art

View freddy1962's profile

freddy1962

899 posts in 273 days


#7 posted 08-10-2014 12:56 AM

Sounds pretty exciting. I’d suggest finding someone who has experience with a table saw, showing you the ropes. A good teacher would show you how and why. Total respect and focus is needed when running a table saw. Be safe.

-- JEFF Illinois (Banks of the Mississippi)

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

251 posts in 393 days


#8 posted 08-10-2014 01:19 AM

There are a number of YouTube videos on basic table saw safety and beginners usage. I would suggest watching some of these to get an idea of what a saw can and can’t do. Get the basic safety gear, hearing protection, eye protection and get some push sticks to start with. Have fun and be safe.

-- Earl

View Monty Queen's profile

Monty Queen

1585 posts in 1976 days


#9 posted 08-10-2014 01:25 AM

Congratulation on getting a table saw. The very first thing is safety specially when you using a table saw. There is great advice mentioned above. If you know some one who has one have them show you the ropes. If you can not get some one youtube has videos that show everything that will help you get started.

Good luck
Remember
Safety First

-- Monty Q, Columbia, South Carolina.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

787 posts in 1034 days


#10 posted 08-10-2014 01:35 AM

Your first accessory should be books, video’s or what ever you can find on the safe operation of a table saw. Here’s a place to start. Pay attention to your inter feelings. If you find something uncomfortable ask about it before you do it.

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/9542/safety-manual-tablesaw

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View MT_Stringer's profile (online now)

MT_Stringer

2071 posts in 1956 days


#11 posted 08-10-2014 01:46 AM

I hate mdf and the dust it creates when it is cut. If your saw has a dust collection port, by all means, get some kind of dust collector. You don’t need to be breathing that stuff.

Even a simple box fan with a filter will help collect some of the airborn dust.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

5506 posts in 581 days


#12 posted 08-10-2014 01:48 AM

I have two diablo blades that I use. I believe the ripping blade is 24 tooth and the crosscutting is 60 tooth. Not sure it makes a difference what you cut MDF with. Know this, it will make terrible dust that will go right in your lungs with that MDF. Ventilation is important when cutting that MDF.
What saw?

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View chetrog's profile

chetrog

71 posts in 188 days


#13 posted 08-10-2014 02:42 AM

Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I will treat the saw like a firearm. Watching tons of video’s on safety. I have a small 10×12 shed, so when i use the saw I am going to be using it outside. Im checking out all the links you guys have given. Thanks again.

-- I had a stroke a few years back, and sometimes the words dont come out as well as I would like.

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

251 posts in 393 days


#14 posted 08-10-2014 03:30 AM

What saw are you getting? Cutting MDF, even outside, get a good respirator.

-- Earl

View Gentile's profile

Gentile

76 posts in 543 days


#15 posted 08-10-2014 05:48 AM

Out feed tables are nice too…

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase