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Bowl sanding tear out

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Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 08-09-2014 03:01 PM 638 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gixxerjoe04

302 posts in 329 days


08-09-2014 03:01 PM

So I seem to not be able to get a bowl sanded nicely. Made a little one yesterday, had some tear out from the cutters so I made some lighter passes and got it all cleaned up nicely. Then I started to sand and it just looks like crap, don’t know how the heck to get it to sand right. I used the little sanding attachment on my drill with still crappy results, I think I got better results just using my hand with sand paper. Don’t know if it’s the sandpaper I’m using or if I’m starting at the wrong grit or what, been using the arbernet(spelling?), seems to work fine most of the time but could be the problem on the drill attachment for bowl sanding. The streaks from the second pic looks like I just held sand paper against it when I didn’t.


19 replies so far

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crippledcarpenter

19 posts in 1199 days


#1 posted 08-09-2014 03:37 PM

Two questions , which tool did you turn the outer part of the bowl with and what grit sand paper are you sanding with?
if you used a carbide tipped turning tool, try a round nose scraper. for you sand paper i would not start any lower than 150 grit. use a partial sheet with a piece of steel wool as a insulator between it and you hand. where the end grain has that tear out look to it, reverse the direction of the lathe. If you dont have reverse, stop the lathe and sand in the opposite direction and that will cut the flattend down end grain for a nicer out come

-- haste makes firewood.

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TheDane

3992 posts in 2416 days


#2 posted 08-09-2014 03:52 PM

I think the problem is your tool technique … those lines you see are tool marks and the tear-out is in the end grain of the blank. If your lathe is reversible, try sanding in reverse (make sure your chuck, face plate or whatever you use to hold the work can be used in reverse).

I assume you are using carbide tools?

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Gixxerjoe04

302 posts in 329 days


#3 posted 08-09-2014 04:02 PM

Used a circle carbide cutter, couldn’t see the lines until I started sanding. I think I started at 180grit with this, but depending on how it looks, sometimes start with 80. The thing was I made some light cuts and it looked fine so I sanded and it didn’t have the marks but the one tear out spot. Then I had turned it around on the lathe from faceplate to glue block and cut the outside again because it was kinda wobbly. I think that’s where I messed up with that part but would that have anything to do with the sanding tear out?

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Roper

1363 posts in 2466 days


#4 posted 08-09-2014 04:13 PM

I love carbide cutters for hollowing but not for shaping of vessels for this exact reason, if you use a sharp bowl gouge cutting in the proper direction you won’t get this kind of tearout.

-- Roper - Master of sawdust- www.roperwoodturning.com

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dirtycurty

44 posts in 331 days


#5 posted 08-09-2014 04:33 PM

I, by no means, consider myself to be a “great” turner but what I do is turn with carbide tools then when I get it to the point you have I use a round nose side scraper like this one. http://www.amazon.com/Crown-265W-4-Inch-Cutting-Scraper/dp/B001C04G7K/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1407600581&sr=8-2-fkmr1&keywords=round+nose+side+scraper. Then I will sand with 120 or 180. Then i will put on a coat of DEFT sanding sealer and let it dry overnight. The next day I will start with whatever grit I left off with, to save a bit of sandpaper start sanding with used sandpaper because it will clog easily. When the sandpaper stops clogging, sand progressively down to 400 with fresh paper. At this point I will take a look at the bowl in bright light moving the bowl around to try to see all the different ways the light will reflect off of it. At this point I will decide if I need another coat of sanding sealer, if so the process starts all over, if not then I progressively sand down to 1000 grit and finish it with a homemade friction polish. I know this sounds like a long process but it really isn’t. I have what I consider successful results.

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TheDane

3992 posts in 2416 days


#6 posted 08-09-2014 05:43 PM

Gixxerjoe04—Thus might be a good topic to bring up on Captain Eddie’s live UStream today at 2pm CT. Send him an email (eddiecastelin@cox.net) and ask him to explain. There are probably a lot of turners that could benefit from hearing about this.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1039 days


#7 posted 08-09-2014 05:50 PM

I’ve overcome this problem by using my DeWalt screw gun with a 2” rotary sander on it. I keep the work on the lathe to do it on low speed. The circular motion of the sander won’t leave lines like just holding sand paper on the spinning bowl. The kits aren’t very expensive and you can use regular disks you cut yourself from hook and loop sandpaper.
Here is what I’m talking about.
http://www.abrasiveresource.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=AC22V-2&click=1098&utm_source=googlebase&utm_medium=shoppingengine&gclid=Cj0KEQjwjZefBRDfsY28oNjbgeABEiQA8kVt3fxb8qQy4qDZV3nuqaqdWNJbhCKY6cCxeuY7pC1tsXgaAv738P8HAQ

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View michelletwo's profile

michelletwo

2292 posts in 1768 days


#8 posted 08-09-2014 05:55 PM

you must start with the grit that will take off the worst you have. Looking at this I’d say 80-100. Holding it by hand is fine. Us old folks have done that for years & it still works!! :-) then go 120-150-180-240 etc. don’t skip grits. as you get up in grits the time between is lessened. being a good sander/finisher is a skill all it’s own.

-- We call the destruction of replaceable human made items vandalism, while the destruction of irreplaceable natural resources is called development.

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TheDane

3992 posts in 2416 days


#9 posted 08-09-2014 07:38 PM

RussallAP—$12.95 is pretty pricey for those 2” Hook and Loop Sanding Disc Back Up Pads … Vince Welsh ( http://vinceswoodnwonders.com/back-up-pads/ ) has the 2” pads for $7.95.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Gixxerjoe04

302 posts in 329 days


#10 posted 08-09-2014 08:31 PM

Vince is who I got the bowl sanding stuff from, he came to our aaw meeting last weekend and I got a starter kit.

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TheDane

3992 posts in 2416 days


#11 posted 08-09-2014 08:47 PM

Gixxerjoe04—Before I start sanding, I often run over the piece with a paper towel dipped in mineral spirits. That shows me what the finished piece will look like and also reveals any tool marks. Often, the tool marks are more like compressed fibers, which sanding does not get out. My lathe reverses and I have reversible chucks, so I always sand in reverse … sometimes I will alternate between forward and reverse between the grits.

dirtycurty mentioned sanding sealer. On just about everything I turn, I use Deft lacquer-based sanding sealer, diluted 50/50 with lacquer thinner. It seals the surface nicely, flashes off in a few minutes (read: short drying time) and doesn’t load up the sandpaper as bad as full strength sealer does.

I don’t wet sand much (personal preference … I don’t like the mess it makes), but on especially difficult pieces I do a bit of wet sanding which seems to improve results.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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dirtycurty

44 posts in 331 days


#12 posted 08-09-2014 09:13 PM

Dane thank you for the tip on diluting the sanding sealer. I have never heard of that before. I will try that on my next bowl

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TheDane

3992 posts in 2416 days


#13 posted 08-09-2014 09:16 PM

dirtycurty—It works like a charm and saves some $$$ too! I can’t take the credit for this tip … I heard it from Captain Eddie ( http://www.eddiecastelin.com )

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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dirtycurty

44 posts in 331 days


#14 posted 08-09-2014 10:03 PM

I got my home made friction polish from Captain Eddie also and credits it to another man whose name evades me right now

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Gixxerjoe04

302 posts in 329 days


#15 posted 08-09-2014 10:49 PM

I use captain eddies “shine juice”, works pretty well

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