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Forum topic by Yonak posted 08-08-2014 02:05 PM 442 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Yonak

279 posts in 179 days


08-08-2014 02:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: persimmon

I’ve had a small stack of persimmon boards hanging around without a project. I’ve never worked persimmon and really didn’t know what it looked like so I thought I’d open some up to see. I got a big surprise that I don’t know what to make of.

Before it was planed it looked pretty white, without real character, and I figured it was just a nondescript nut wood. When I planed it, this was what saw inside :

Not all the boards are this gray but a good many of them are. What, in the surfaced board, looks like it could be sapwood is what remains of an envelope of white that surrounded every board. Here’s an end view :

On the edges can be seen the thin layer of white that was on all surfaces, even in some nicks and gouges in some of the boards, before surfacing. Obviously that white layer got there somehow after the boards were cut. I wonder what it’s about. Here’s a shot of the cut ends of unsurfaced boards :

I don’t know if the boards were kiln dried but, maybe, the white layer was part of some kind of chemical treatment. I’ve never seen anything like it before.


7 replies so far

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sras

3845 posts in 1787 days


#1 posted 08-08-2014 02:20 PM

That is very ineresting – oxidation?

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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Rick M.

3978 posts in 1038 days


#2 posted 08-08-2014 04:28 PM

Could be oxidation from being air dried or exposed to the sun. Never worked with Persimmon but Roy talked about it in his mallet episode. Supposed to be hard but difficult to work and shrinks a lot.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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WDHLT15

1131 posts in 1134 days


#3 posted 08-09-2014 01:05 AM

Yonak,

That is exactly how my persimmon looks. I think that it is gray stain from drying slow. When sawn fresh, the wood is light in color and yellowish. Something happens in drying to turn the inside that bluish gray color, and it must be gray stain. Still very pretty, though.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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Yonak

279 posts in 179 days


#4 posted 08-09-2014 02:35 AM


Yonak,

That is exactly how my persimmon looks. I think that it is gray stain from drying slow. When sawn fresh, the wood is light in color and yellowish. Something happens in drying to turn the inside that bluish gray color, and it must be gray stain. Still very pretty, though.

- WDHLT15

..So, when it’s fresh cut it’s white and, after drying, the inside, except for a thin exposed skin, turns gray ? Do you think it’s the same chemical reaction that gives maple that splotchy gray staining, or do you think it’s something else ? This graying in persimmon seems to be more pervasive and even.

You’re right .. it’s fairly attractive, but I like it better with less gray, which is 2/3s of the boards, some very white :

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shampeon

1377 posts in 841 days


#5 posted 08-09-2014 03:43 AM

Persimmon is an ebony, so it’s probably a similar reaction for the heartwood, albeit lighter than African ebonies.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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Yonak

279 posts in 179 days


#6 posted 08-09-2014 04:00 AM



Persimmon is an ebony, so it s probably a similar reaction for the heartwood, albeit lighter than African ebonies.

- shampeon

ian, what do you mean by similar reaction for the heartwood ?

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WDHLT15

1131 posts in 1134 days


#7 posted 08-09-2014 11:39 AM

I do think that it is the same enzymatic oxidation reaction that causes gray stain in maple and pecan. Something chemical is definitely going on.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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