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Any ideas on what is holding the inlay in place?

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Forum topic by Sandman1022 posted 08-06-2014 06:58 PM 873 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sandman1022

6 posts in 44 days


08-06-2014 06:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: rustic

I’m still a beginner woodworker and I saw this in a shop a few weeks back and wondered if anyone had any idea what is being used as “grout” to hold the inlay in place. I’ve seen this done before, but the branch crosscuts were just all wedged together. I was thinking about doing something like this on a future project and I would really like to fill the gaps between the inlay pieces. Any ideas?? I really appreciate your input.

 photo 20140717_143355_zps015d9365.jpg

-- How much wood would a wood chuck chuck, oh nevermind......


23 replies so far

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Wally331

263 posts in 679 days


#1 posted 08-06-2014 07:08 PM

Dyed epoxy almost for sure, but considering I’m not an expert that’s about all I can tell you.

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Earlextech

979 posts in 1345 days


#2 posted 08-06-2014 07:13 PM

It looks to me as if the branch cutoffs were first inlaid into a piece of veneer and then the full sheet inlaid into the top veneer. Time consuming, yes, but that what you get with veneer.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

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Yonak

278 posts in 175 days


#3 posted 08-06-2014 10:50 PM

It could be tinted Bondo.


It looks to me as if the branch cutoffs were first inlaid into a piece of veneer and then the full sheet inlaid into the top veneer. Time consuming, yes, but that what you get with veneer.

- Earlextech

Earl, do you mean the veneer is pressed into the voids between the branches then removed from atop the branches by surfacing ?

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mudflap4869

336 posts in 113 days


#4 posted 08-06-2014 11:09 PM

Glue up the branch peices. Scripe the top to match then cut with a scroll saw. Glue it to a backing then fill with dyed epoxy.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

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Jim Finn

1676 posts in 1576 days


#5 posted 08-07-2014 01:28 AM

The photo looks to me like a mixture of glue and sanding dust was used as “grout”

-- In God We Trust

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Earlextech

979 posts in 1345 days


#6 posted 08-07-2014 02:30 PM

Yonak, not exactly. Any veneered design is created by edge gluing the veneer shapes together first and then applied as a sheet to the substrate. If these branches were cut to the thickness of veneer, corresponding holes cut into the sheet of veneer and then edge glued into it. You could accomplish this pattern.
Notice my box top, each individual piece is edge glued together then applied as a single sheet onto the box top.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

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bigblockyeti

1547 posts in 375 days


#7 posted 08-07-2014 02:37 PM

Dyed epoxy would be my guess too, this could be tricky if too much is used as epoxy doesn’t sand as well as wood and could melt under less than ideal conditions.

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Yonak

278 posts in 175 days


#8 posted 08-07-2014 03:27 PM


Yonak, not exactly. Any veneered design is created by edge gluing the veneer shapes together first and then applied as a sheet to the substrate. If these branches were cut to the thickness of veneer, corresponding holes cut into the sheet of veneer and then edge glued into it. You could accomplish this pattern.
Notice my box top, each individual piece is edge glued together then applied as a single sheet onto the box top.

- Earlextech

Do you mean each branch end could have been hand cut out of the veneer ?

Check out this “inlay” job. I’m quite sure he didn’t cut out all the pieces individually :


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Earlextech

979 posts in 1345 days


#9 posted 08-07-2014 03:42 PM

Yes. Most could have been cut using a punch. Also, in looking at the piece again, I’m not convinced it’s actually real wood, which makes this all moot. It could be a fabricated sheet, more of a photographic process than woodworking! After all, we don’t know if this is a custom piece or a factory run.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

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Yonak

278 posts in 175 days


#10 posted 08-07-2014 04:03 PM



Yes. Most could have been cut using a punch. Also, in looking at the piece again, I m not convinced it s actually real wood, which makes this all moot. It could be a fabricated sheet, more of a photographic process than woodworking! After all, we don t know if this is a custom piece or a factory run.

- Earlextech

Sam, you’ve got a good point there about it possibly not being real wood.

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Earlextech

979 posts in 1345 days


#11 posted 08-07-2014 04:08 PM

Yonak, That last post was most certainly cut on a cnc. My wife was a picture framer and she had a cnc to cut fancy mats out, could have done that easily.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

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Sandman1022

6 posts in 44 days


#12 posted 08-07-2014 06:11 PM

This was part of a two piece set in a custom art shop. The two pieces that were done this way were definitely real wood. The grout that was in the joints had kind of a gritty texture look to it. Is it possible that it was sawdust and glue or would that have shrunk too much? Here’s the other piece.

 photo 20140717_143527_zps7d13eee1.jpg

-- How much wood would a wood chuck chuck, oh nevermind......

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Sandman1022

6 posts in 44 days


#13 posted 08-07-2014 06:12 PM

I should have taken a close up shot of the filler. Kicking myself now.

-- How much wood would a wood chuck chuck, oh nevermind......

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Yonak

278 posts in 175 days


#14 posted 08-07-2014 06:37 PM


Yonak, That last post was most certainly cut on a cnc. My wife was a picture framer and she had a cnc to cut fancy mats out, could have done that easily.

- Earlextech

Sam, actually it was done with a press and sandpaper. I didn’t do it but I’m referring to the procedure description.

This is a dash plate from a 1927 Cadillac that was refurbished. It’s pretty certain the original procedure was pretty much the same.

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Earlextech

979 posts in 1345 days


#15 posted 08-07-2014 07:33 PM

Yonak, Considering it from ‘27 I’m sure it was a press, essentially a large punch that can be used repeatedly. Some very fine metal smith did make the original by hand.

Sandman1022, Take a look here – http://www.roberts-plywood.com/butt-cut-veneers.html

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

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