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Forum topic by chrisstef posted 08-06-2014 04:05 PM 1293 views 0 times favorited 55 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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chrisstef

11139 posts in 1696 days


08-06-2014 04:05 PM

In the next month ill be moving into a new house and into a new shop space that is a completely unfinished basement. Its got good height ceilings at around 8.5’ high but aside from that there is nothing down there. Im talking no electrical no nothing. It does have the hot water furnace, the air handler for the central AC and the water filtration system. Access is a Bilko door from the exterior and a set of interior stairs.

Now ive read a bunch of threads in regard to the pros and cons of a basement shop. In some instances its good, in others, its not so good. Coming from an existing basement shop I like how I can pop in and out and not be out of earshot of the wife or my son. It stays relatively climate controlled as well. All good things.

So I come here to pose to you guys, if you had a basement shop, what kind of things would you implement to make it a good functional space for a hybrid style of woodworking? Id like to build out this shop once and do it right the first time even if it takes me a year to do. Ive got a plan of adding a dedicated 100 amp panel that can be locked out when im not there to avoid curious children running tablesaws and the like.

So in your dream shop in the basement how would you build it out? Im talking lights, electrical, dust collection, air filtration, flooring, noise reduction, and storage. Lets hear it gang!

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty


55 replies so far

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bigblockyeti

1667 posts in 410 days


#1 posted 08-06-2014 04:11 PM

I’d layout the space with what tools and machines I have (+ what I plan on getting in the future) to maximize the use of the space and ease the work flow through the shop. keeping the noise and dust in the basement would be a high priority too. My shop is separated from my house and at times gets pretty dusty, if in the house, I couldn’t let that happen with the fear of mitigation into the rest of the house which would not be tolerated by several others. Getting bigger projects as well as your machines (initially) into and out of the shop should be a consideration as well. Figure out how to do it and what your limitations are.

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theoldfart

4485 posts in 1140 days


#2 posted 08-06-2014 04:12 PM

Sef, biggest issue for me is an uneven floor. I’d like to level mine and install a wooden one like Smitty’s. Dropped planes and chisels would be less catastrophic. The only other improvement would be to somehow get my DC outside and baffled.

-- "Aged flatus, I heard that some one has already blown out your mortise." THE Surgeon ……………………………………. Kevin

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chrisstef

11139 posts in 1696 days


#3 posted 08-06-2014 04:18 PM

Good thoughts there guys. As far as machinery is concerned im pretty well set on what ive got. Jointer, planer, cabinet saw, drill press, band saw, router table, HF dust collector, and an air filtration jammy. Outside of that I probably don’t see myself gaining any new big gear besides the running joke of a work bench ;).

The house is newer (1988) so the floor seemed to be fairly level but I really wont know until I get in there to check it out again but definitely something to consider.

Im tentatively thinking about leaving the majority of my gear in the garage until I square some things up and start building out the shop.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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jmartel

2324 posts in 839 days


#4 posted 08-06-2014 04:22 PM

The floor is going to be sloped all towards a drain. So, be aware of that.

I would put in at least x2 20amp 110v circuits and a 220v circuit. Lots of outlets.

Lots of light. On their own separate circuit from the other tools. I blow my breaker all the time, and it leaves me in the dark when I have my garage door down.

I would rig up a moveable curtain sort of like in doctor’s offices/hospitals for a finishing booth. Out of the way when not needed, but protects everything when you want it to.

Paint all your walls, floors, and ceilings first thing or you will never get around to doing it because you have to work around the machines.

If you have heat/AC returns in the basement, close them off so you don’t send dust to the rest of the house.

-- End grain is like a belly button. Yes, I know you have one. No, I don't want to see it.

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Don W

15240 posts in 1257 days


#5 posted 08-06-2014 04:22 PM

sound proof the ceiling.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Mosquito

4836 posts in 982 days


#6 posted 08-06-2014 04:32 PM

Definitely soundproof the ceiling like Don said. Our projector and my stereo are downstairs, and the ceiling is only drop down tile with no insulation behind it, and you can pretty easily hear what’s playing in the basement when you’re upstairs.

Other thing I’d like is a large basin sink… tool restorations and what not

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

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Richard

969 posts in 1380 days


#7 posted 08-06-2014 04:32 PM

I would find a way to seperate the mech. systems from the shop area to prevent dust and fumes from entering the rest of the house. Keep it from going into the Central Air system. And as Don said Soundproof the ceiling as much as possiable.

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Mosquito

4836 posts in 982 days


#8 posted 08-06-2014 04:35 PM



I would find a way to seperate the mech. systems from the shop area to prevent dust and fumes from entering the rest of the house. Keep it from going into the Central Air system.

- Richard

I 100% agree there too… given my old shop was the spare bedroom where my heat/ac unit was, and had the only return vent to it…

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

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theoldfart

4485 posts in 1140 days


#9 posted 08-06-2014 04:43 PM

My mech and laundry are isolated from the rest of the shop. Also +1 on sound proofing, it’s on my todo list.

-- "Aged flatus, I heard that some one has already blown out your mortise." THE Surgeon ……………………………………. Kevin

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Planeman40

486 posts in 1450 days


#10 posted 08-06-2014 04:56 PM

Having had a basement workshop for years now, here is what I would do.

Paint the walls white. Will brighten the place immensely and you won’t feel like you are working in a cavern.

Seal and paint the concrete floor. Once the machines and tools are in you won’t get a chance.

Provide (or allow for) three separate electrical circuits. One for lighting, one for machines, and a third for 3-phase 220 volts. Here is why. When a machine trips a circuit breaker you won’t be standing there in the darkness trying to fix things. The 3-phase 220 circuit is to allow for the addition of 3-phase industrial used machines in the future. I keep up with the used tool auctions and very nice and clean 3-phase light industrial saws, planers, etc are going dirt cheap because these are most often bought by home shop people, not industrial shops, and so few home shop people are equipped to handle 3-phase. On this circuit I would allow for one 3-phase converter to run all 3-phase machines – one at a time, of course!

Good lighting is paramount of course. You might want to see if you might be able to get a bunch of fluorescent fixtures from a building that is being renovated or torn down. Just make sure they are 115 volts. I was able to light my entire shop this way for free. Well, almost free. When I got the lights home I found they were all set up to run on 440 volts! I had to replace all of the ballasts. Even so, I saved money.

And one last thing. I went to the trouble to be able to unplug all of my lights. The reason why is under Georgia real estate law anything that is hard wired to the house or nailed or glued to the house goes with the house when sold. If it is screwed in or plugged in, it is considered removable and does not go with the sale and can be taken with the seller.

. . . . the little things you learn over the nearly 60 years of having a basement shop!

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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hairy

2067 posts in 2221 days


#11 posted 08-06-2014 05:02 PM

You can keep sawdust from getting in the living space, but it takes effort. I have 2 air cleaners running, use dust collection as much as possible, and clean up as I go.

If you have the old time steps like I have, treads and stringers , make sure they can handle the weight. I put in extra supports under the stringers and added screws to the nails securing the treads.

I keep the really loud and dusty tools in the garage.

-- the last of Barret's Privateers...

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widdle

1457 posts in 1688 days


#12 posted 08-06-2014 05:05 PM

Good call not to bring everything in, and do the work first…If water is no issue , I’d ply the walls and throw cdx on the floor and call it good..

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ToddJB

2528 posts in 820 days


#13 posted 08-06-2014 05:20 PM

Plan your space with your machines here.
Then run your electrical according to where your machines will ideally be.
Block off HW tank and furnace etc. Maybe even make another dedicated small room for Compressor and DC
Insulate and soundproof ceiling.
Put something up on the walls, ply or osb on the walls.
Move in.

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

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Planeman40

486 posts in 1450 days


#14 posted 08-06-2014 05:21 PM

I should throw in heating and air conditioning. Usually basements are not heated but are relatively warm in the winter and cool in the summer due to their location. I opened up some heating pipes on the ceiling above with a few vents added. This helped. And the air conditioning reduced the humidity (I live in Atlanta, GA where you bathe in the humidity in the summer) to where I have virtually no rust problem . . . with a little help from Mr. WD-40. And when I finally had to replace the old central air conditioner I bought additional capacity and had the installers add a few more vents.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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chrisstef

11139 posts in 1696 days


#15 posted 08-06-2014 05:31 PM

Solid stuff being thrown around.

Jmart – There’s no floor drains down there and water does not seem to be an issue. No sump pump and no evidence of any water infiltration. I do believe that there are curtain / footing drains on the property.

Lighting will definitely come off of jobs sites. Being a demolition contractor has its perks. Most likely ill grab some t8’s. Possibly can lights depending on the voltage but most I see are 277.

White paint will be a must. I don’t want a dungeon.

How would you guys sound proof? I know it can and will be expensive. Ive thought about using unfaced batts, homosote, drywall on hat channel, spray foam, mineral wool … the options seems almost endless. Again, being a demolition contractor I can scavange a lot of stuff off of jobs. Insulation by the dumpster load goes out.

Widdle – cdx on the floor … vapor barrier first? 6 mil? on sleepers? dow board?

Planeman – im not sure how much service I have coming into the house. Im assuming its 200 amps worth but currently theres a 100 am panel and a 60 amp subpanel for a generator. With the power being underground I don’t really want to have to trench up the yard to pull more wire and install a larger conduit if I can avoid it. The existing 100 am main is full with no breaker slots open. Maybe I can branch off a circuit out of the main panel for the lighting and keep all the tools and receptacles on the shops sub panel?

Hairy – Like you, I typically run my planer (sir snipesalot) outside and most likely ill keep it that way. The bad boy screams.

Thanks for all the replies gang.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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