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How to repair a chipped leg of a dresser

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Forum topic by dscalf1 posted 08-06-2014 02:24 PM 1847 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dscalf1

4 posts in 855 days


08-06-2014 02:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shaping carving finishing refurbishing sanding

I am entering the world of DIY projects and it is kicking my a**.. I am trying to refinish a dresser to be a TV Stand. I got the dresser for free on craigslist picked it up at night, it sat in my garage for a few weeks, and now that I am ready to work on it I realized one of the claw foot legs is chipped off. The dresser still stands perfectly fine as the leg is still there I am just wondering what is the easiest way to reconstruct the claw part ( will include pictures). I have never carved wood or anything so I am a very beginner stage of this so please include details and name brand of products I would need. I read another post about Epoxy could I use that and make some type of mold to fill? any help would be greatly appreciated I feel like I am in way over my head here!!!

(Good Leg)

(Chipped Leg)


9 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2315 days


#1 posted 08-06-2014 03:31 PM

That’s a version of a pad foot, which is much simpler than a claw or ball and claw, and fairly simple to replicate with some practice. I don’t know what the rest of the dresser looks like, but you’ve got a couple of options;

a) Glue closely sized blocks of similar species to the broken parts and shape with rasps, files and sanders to sculpt ~~the shape, You can do this with Minwax filler; http://www.minwax.com/wood-products/maintenance-repair/minwax-high-performance-wood-filler

b) Look online for a replacement foot

c) Match the “good” foot to the chipped one, again, don’t know your end design, this would work for a shabby ~~chic style

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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AnonymousRequest

861 posts in 1014 days


#2 posted 08-06-2014 03:49 PM

What chefdan said. It’s looks like the bad foot was sanded. You’ll have to take a 2” chisel and drive straight down both sides to get a straight, close to square surface to work with. Sand lightly a bit back and see your grain pattern so you can glue your block(s) to match the existing grain. Looks like Honduran mahogany? Precut your block close to form on a bandsaw or whatever works. Leave extra in every direction. I personally would glue the blocks and screw it. Screwing it would be your best bet to get it to bond and hold. You can come back and mix sawdust from your wood and yellow glue to patch the screw holes. After the blocks have cured for a few days use a carving knife or aggressive rasp to shape pushing into toward the existing leg, not away. You just keep going, working from rasp to different sandpaper grits to feather it in. If you want to pay for shipping, I have plenty of scrap mahogany. I’ll help you, just pm me. I’ve done many similar repairs.

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dscalf1

4 posts in 855 days


#3 posted 08-06-2014 03:53 PM

Freddy it says I can not private message you until I post more. I am planning on painting this piece and not staining it. With that being said my only option is I have to carve the wood? Wood Epoxy wouldnt work just for the cosmetic look to the piece? I feel like that would be easier than carving wood but I really have no idea what I am doing so Im not sure..

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1953 days


#4 posted 08-06-2014 04:09 PM

If you are painting, use grey Bondo. It works great and is easy to form.

If you really want to make a clay or plaster of paris mold of the good foot, (‘member to cover the good foot with saran wrap), then once the mold is filled from the bondo, clean up everything with sand paper and make sure it looks like you want it.
Cut the broken foot back so it’s straight and attach the molded piece, making sure it’s also straight, plumb and true.
You can attach with more bondo, epoxy or Gorilla glue expanding glue.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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AnonymousRequest

861 posts in 1014 days


#5 posted 08-06-2014 04:10 PM

Sorry I didn’t look at your post count. You don’t have to carve, preshape it a bit and form it with a rasp or whatever works. You could use 40 grit attached to blocks of wood to shape it. If you’re painting it, bondo or epoxy it for sure. You could also use pretty much any kind of wood too.

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dscalf1

4 posts in 855 days


#6 posted 08-06-2014 04:13 PM

Okay perfect thank yall for all the help one last silly question (told yall I was new at this!!!) What is the major difference between bondo vs epoxy? and which would be better for this project? Which Brand?

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1953 days


#7 posted 08-06-2014 04:44 PM

Bondo is pretty solid and will stay where you put it. Most epoxy is runny and if you don’t have a leak proof mold will leak out.
Bondo is also easier to form with a rasp, chisel or knife.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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dscalf1

4 posts in 855 days


#8 posted 08-06-2014 04:54 PM

Thank you so much everyone for all your help!

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JAAune

1646 posts in 1782 days


#9 posted 08-06-2014 05:25 PM

Chippedendale furniture?

I’d go with the wood repair but bondo is fine for painted repairs on furniture with little antique value.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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