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Hollowing tools

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Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 08-01-2014 04:44 PM 647 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gixxerjoe04

294 posts in 232 days


08-01-2014 04:44 PM

I’m looking for a hollowing tool that’s not ewt since they’re really expensive. Trying to hollow anything that has a small opening and deeper than a few inches seems like not a good idea with my 1/2” bar. Wasn’t sure if there’s a special tool for longer depth work like that or not.


11 replies so far

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

1259 posts in 1840 days


#1 posted 08-01-2014 06:21 PM

You might consider a carbide tool from here:

http://eddiecastelin.com/combos_and_other_items

I made my own for deep hollowing, and it works great:

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/84210

-- Allen, Colorado

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1038 posts in 790 days


#2 posted 08-01-2014 09:09 PM

You have to decide whether want carbide or HSS steel hollowing tools.
Then decide if have the skill set to make your own tools or pay for already made tools.

I like John Jordan & David Ellsworth style hollowing tools but recently learned about Trent Bosch tools.
http://www.trentbosch.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=1

Beauty of HSS tips or cutters is cost and ability to sharpen.

I cannot keep up with all the carbide hollowing tools and cutters available. Some people have no problem touching up an edge with diamond files and others just find non-turning suppliers of carbide cutters for replacement cutters.

I have Sorby HSS mini 3 piece set for ornaments and Jordnon hollowing tools.

-- Bill

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Gixxerjoe04

294 posts in 232 days


#3 posted 08-01-2014 10:39 PM

Well I have Capt Eddie’s carbide tools, the 1/2 bars. I haven’t done any hollowing deep so maybe it’s just uncomfortable to me, but it also catches a lot if I go too deep with the bar which can be bad news. Forgot there’s the monthly AAW meeting tomorrow, will probably ask some guys there but most of them are old school and don’t use carbide and that’s all I’ve used.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3785 posts in 2319 days


#4 posted 08-01-2014 11:56 PM

I have John Jordan’s hollowing tools … I have been very happy with them. The HSS cutters are easy to sharpen and produce very good results:
Click for details

I had to learn to be patient and take light cuts when hollowing. When you are extended that far over the tool rest, you just can’t take deep cuts.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Roper's profile

Roper

1359 posts in 2369 days


#5 posted 08-02-2014 01:26 PM

I turn a lot of hollow forms and the tool i use depends on the size of form I am making. For bigger vessels I use Kelton hollowing tools, for smaller vessels and ornaments I use the small Hunter hollowing tools. If your having problems with getting a catch remember that the tool needs to be in the trailing position which means the cutter is just slightly pointed down hill. The worst thing you can do while hollowing is approach the cut with the cutter pointing up hill.

-- Roper - Master of sawdust- www.roperwoodturning.com

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2874 days


#6 posted 08-02-2014 01:39 PM

Roper, thanks for that. I’ve had trouble getting catches when trying to hollow with a round carbide cutter. I think my problem has been trying to keep the cutter at 90 degrees to the surface rather than slightly downhill.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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TheDane

3785 posts in 2319 days


#7 posted 08-02-2014 02:11 PM

Charlie—That’s one of the problems with the run-of-the-mill carbide tools that are made with a square bar. Unless you knock the corners off the bar, you’ll either put dings in your tool rest or run the risk of catches inside the form. I use something called a ’torque arrestor’ with my HSS tools:

One of the guys in my turning club cranked out a bunch of these for club members.

Essentially the torque arrestor is a stop collar with a L-shaped rod welded to it. This permits you to set the cutter at a slight angle to avoid catches while keeping the tool from twisting inside the vessel. They are pretty cheap to make.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2874 days


#8 posted 08-02-2014 02:30 PM

Thanks, Gerry. I might give that a try that myself. I do have a cutter with a round bar (a handmade gift from a fellow LJ), so I should be good to go.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Darell's profile

Darell

421 posts in 2250 days


#9 posted 08-02-2014 03:30 PM

You might try www.carbidewoodturningtools.com. (sorry, I haven’t figured out how to do the link right so it can be clicked on) They aren’t cheap but I have two of the SR series. They are square bar stock with an adjustable insert holder that can be adjusted to any angle you desire. The square bar stock makes it easy to keep the tool on the tool rest where you want it. There are many different angles and cutter sizes available. I got mine unhandled. Slightly cheaper that way.

-- Darell, Norman, Ok.

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

294 posts in 232 days


#10 posted 08-03-2014 04:42 PM

Roper that is probably my problem, usually go at 90 degrees and possibly uphill, will have to work on that, thanks for the tip.

View Don Thur's profile

Don Thur

9 posts in 915 days


#11 posted 08-11-2014 08:49 PM

If you are interested in low-markup nanograde carbide cutters, check out knotsburls.com/kiliantools available for woodturners by woodturners.

-- Don

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