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Sharpening tongue groove cutter

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Forum topic by LeslieJohn posted 08-01-2014 02:35 PM 1136 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LeslieJohn

15 posts in 857 days


08-01-2014 02:35 PM

Hi Guys

I am new here but and am please to be here. I have a question about my Stanley handplane #50. I got it from a antique shop near me. Lucky for me all the cutters were included. My problem is that my tongue and groove cutter are off. I mean the right cutter is fraction longer that that of the left side. You arn’t see it with your eyes but planing it on wood you immediately sees it. The right cutter is doing the job while the left one does nothing but the skate is sliding on the surface. I tried to adjust it but there is noway to adjust unless to reshape the cutters by sharping more on the left to get it level. I do have a horning jig but then it so difficult to align it in the jig. I don’t want to grind and waste the cutter as I contacted serveral companies for sush cutter but was told that these cutters were not made any longer. So I am trying to be careful not the mess up the cutter. Is there a way to a accurancy sharpen it?

Thks Guys!

-- leslie john


7 replies so far

View Wally331's profile

Wally331

341 posts in 1488 days


#1 posted 08-01-2014 03:46 PM

I’ve heard that some carpenters sharpened them like that purposely, so the show face of the joint was always tight and the backside was not in the way if it expanded slightly differently.

However if I were you I would jise use a combo square and draw a line across the iron and grid the one side down until they are level. I don’t think there’s any way to get them square without a little grinding. Also, lie Nielsen may sell replacement blades. You could check eBay also.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13719 posts in 2081 days


#2 posted 08-01-2014 06:02 PM

^ what wally said. Draw a line and grind (wheel or course stone/DMT) to get it square. Unless it’s off by and 1/8” or so, and the cutter is already used up, there should be plenty of lifetime left after the operaiton is complete.

But before you do that…

Make sure it’s the iron and not the user.

I say that because it’s easy to think I’m square to an edge with my planes (jointer, joinery, etc) but the square tells me otherwise…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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12strings

434 posts in 1847 days


#3 posted 08-01-2014 07:14 PM

I’ll se one the reminder that a t& g plane is sharpened that way on purpose so that the show face is always flush.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13719 posts in 2081 days


#4 posted 08-01-2014 08:03 PM

That sounds like a solution in search of a problem to me. I prefer them to match, as the cutters on my #48 and #49 do (old Stanley planes that came that way). It already requires some mental gymnastics to keep the faces straight when the groove is not centered perfectly in the stock. Then I’d have to be concerned which leg of the cutter is longer while reading the grain of the piece and deciding which should be the show face.

Yeah, I know, it’s not rocket science. But leaving one side of the groove longer to account for uneven expansion, when T&G is typically applied to the backs of carcases, seems like needless hassle.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Don W's profile

Don W

17962 posts in 2030 days


#5 posted 08-02-2014 11:14 AM

I’ve never read about one leg being shorter but I can see why in some cases it would be an advantage. I’d want mine even as well though. If I want one leg shorter (and I’ve done this) I just hit the back side leg with a block plane.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13719 posts in 2081 days


#6 posted 08-02-2014 03:31 PM



I ve never read about one leg being shorter but I can see why in some cases it would be an advantage. I d want mine even as well though. If I want one leg shorter (and I ve done this) I just hit the back side leg with a block plane.

- Don W

I’ve done the same.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View LeslieJohn's profile

LeslieJohn

15 posts in 857 days


#7 posted 08-02-2014 04:33 PM

Thank you guyz for your help. Ok I will do what Wally says and just do it . My comman sense tells me that may be the best way!

Thka again!

-- leslie john

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