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I need advise about I minimally need to sharpen my chisels and plane irons

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Forum topic by zymurgist posted 07-31-2014 09:08 PM 993 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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zymurgist

14 posts in 127 days


07-31-2014 09:08 PM

I am new to wood working and will be taking an intro class this fall and I want to get my sharpening skills honed ( started) in advance. So far I have done the scary sharp method on plate glass but it seems that I wear out the sand paper really quickly then I have to take it off scrape and clean the glass and put a new piece on. the grits I use are (400,500,800,100, 1200, 1500,2000, 2500) 4 on each side of the glass. I recently got a 8” coarse DMT (blue) that I have been using to flatten the irons and chisels. Chisels are new (Woodcraft brand). I also have the MK II honing guide. I really did not like the instability of the cheap one I have. At a minimum what other DMT’s would i need to get the chisels ready for use? I figured I could still to the scary method for polishing along with the bench strop I made.

TIA
Z


22 replies so far

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

10196 posts in 1337 days


#1 posted 07-31-2014 09:19 PM

I have the DMT duo-sharps that have four grits total, one on each side of the two plates. Those, in concert with a charged strop, is all I require for sharp edges.

The scary sharp method drove me crazy for the same reason identify above: went through paper too fast.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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zymurgist

14 posts in 127 days


#2 posted 07-31-2014 09:22 PM

Thanks for the advise. Since I already have the one DMT Stone would the fine/extra fine do?

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

10196 posts in 1337 days


#3 posted 07-31-2014 09:26 PM

I don’t think I’d recommend skipping a middle grit as the fine / extra fine wouldn’t refine the edge as effectively… Is there a color chip on that DMT of yours (black or blue, for example)?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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mantwi

312 posts in 615 days


#4 posted 07-31-2014 09:27 PM

The grits you are using should give you excellent results, 2500 is plenty sharp enough for any wood working application. The scary sharp technique was my go to for quite a while and I hated scraping adhesive off of glass too. Then I started using soapy water as a lubricant for the wet dry sandpaper and found that wetting the back of the paper was enough to stick it in place via surface cohesion. Blue painters tape around the perimeter of the sheets works well too if you don’t use water. I’m transitioning to water stones now but still like the scary sharp method. It allows me to sharpen 20”planer knives with a simple shop made jig and get them razor sharp with couple of sheets of sand paper butted together. You can get a lot of money tied up in various sharpening devices pretty fast so I’d advise you to pick the one that appeals to you and focus on perfecting the process. You’ll find that they all yield great results when done right and that a lot of the hype about what’s best is just that. Hype. Sharpening is like trout fishing. You have the purist who use custom rods and hand tied flies and turn their noses up at anything different than how they do it and then you have the guys who simply catch fish. What do you want to do collect stones or sharpen your tools? It’s that simple.

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JayT

2524 posts in 930 days


#5 posted 07-31-2014 09:32 PM



I don t think I d recommend skipping a middle grit as the fine / extra fine wouldn t refine the edge as effectively… Is there a color chip on that DMT of yours (black or blue, for example)?

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

I would agree with this. I use coarse, medium & extra fine diamond plates, plus a strop and get good results. Coarse is used to redefine the bevel or straighten an edge. Medium is good for irons & chisels that have a worn edge, but are still shaped well. Extra fine and the strop for putting the final touch on the edges.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

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zymurgist

14 posts in 127 days


#6 posted 07-31-2014 09:35 PM



I don t think I d recommend skipping a middle grit as the fine / extra fine wouldn t refine the edge as effectively… Is there a color chip on that DMT of yours (black or blue, for example)?

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Mine is the Blue one

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zymurgist

14 posts in 127 days


#7 posted 07-31-2014 09:38 PM

so if I had to but one of the Duo sharps for now which would be the best route to go. I am also going to try the water on glass trick but I do want a more permanent solution

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JayT

2524 posts in 930 days


#8 posted 07-31-2014 09:44 PM

I don t think I d recommend skipping a middle grit as the fine / extra fine wouldn t refine the edge as effectively… Is there a color chip on that DMT of yours (black or blue, for example)?

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Mine is the Blue one

- zymurgist

I think the DMT blue is pretty similar to a Medium for some of the other manufacturers (like EZE Lap, which is what I have). You could probably skip the fine and go right to Extra-fine. To keep costs down, you could still use sandpaper for the very coarse work, because you won’t need to use it as often. As budget allows, you might consider adding an extra coarse stone.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

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zymurgist

14 posts in 127 days


#9 posted 07-31-2014 09:47 PM

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JayT

2524 posts in 930 days


#10 posted 07-31-2014 10:04 PM

That’s fine,, it’s a good place to start. I was just pointing out that DMT labels their plates as Extra Coarse, Coarse, Fine and Extra Fine, they don’t have a Medium, for some reason.

You could probably skip the red and get a green (extra-fine) and be OK. If using DMT’s, I would probably want to end up with an Extra Coarse (black), Coarse (blue) and Extra Fine (green), plus a strop. I prefer the solid plates like the DiaSharp rather than the interrupted plates like you have or the DuoSharps, but whichever you feel more comfortable with is fine.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

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12strings

431 posts in 1103 days


#11 posted 08-01-2014 02:16 AM

I have been very happy with a simple dual sided water stone (1000/6000). Once I grind the proper angle initially on really rough sandpaper…I use the stone, and I’m done.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

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ksSlim

997 posts in 1609 days


#12 posted 08-01-2014 03:18 AM

I use 5 (five) DMTs from Xcoarse to XXfine plus a strop.
DMT don’t wear out. Get the long boys, you won’t be sorry.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

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Don W

15397 posts in 1286 days


#13 posted 08-02-2014 11:01 AM

I hope I’m not muddying the water more, but I use an 8” grinder to hollow grind and go straight to a fine stone. In my opinion its quicker, easier and cheaper and does just as good of a job.

the other advantage is hollow grinding makes it easier to eliminate the need for the jig when you get confident enough.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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JohnChung

271 posts in 793 days


#14 posted 08-02-2014 06:41 PM

I use Shapton and very satisfied. But it is wetstone.

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bandit571

7300 posts in 1402 days


#15 posted 08-02-2014 10:41 PM

I use a mixture of things

Grinder for the new bevels ( some that show up here have a ~ look to the edge)
MK1 Honing guide running on a beltsander, IF needed after the grinder
A Double sided oil stone with 3in1 oil, and the MK1
A 12×12 floor tile, and a few strips of wet or dry sand paper. Goes up to 2500 grit. The MK1 stay put through all the above. Remeber to treat the back of the cutter, too.

Have an old belt, wornout as a nail pouch belt. Cut a strip of it, and load it with the Green Polishing stuff. A few hard pulls to strop, and call it done

At one time, that little block plane had trouble making splinters…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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