LumberJocks

need help removing some old bushings in my old band saw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by louspinuso posted 07-31-2014 05:12 PM 906 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View louspinuso's profile

louspinuso

4 posts in 866 days


07-31-2014 05:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question help band saw bushing

I bought a 10” bandsaw off craigslist a few days ago for $40. The saw and motor looked to be in very good condition and it was an old rockwell delta 28-120 so I figured I should be able to fix anything that’s too wrong with it. When I got it home and started trying to get it rolling I noticed that my wheels were way out of alignment and my blade would not track straight so I took apart the top wheel first and made sure everything was good there, and everything appeared to be fine so I went on to the bottom wheel.

This is where things got interesting. first, when I pulled the wheel off I noticed that the back top was rubbing the cast iron frame and part of that back top area was melted in (the wheels look like they’re some sort of composite material, not iron, not sure how much of a problem that is going to be) and when I pulled the whole thing apart, I found bushings behind the wheel that were completely shot.

And this is what it looks like from the outside where the oiler is (the side the pulley would hook up to)

I have no idea what the best way to push those bushings out and I’ve searched to see if anyone else here had a similair problem with a similair vintage saw and couldn’t find one. Also, there appear to be 2 separate bushings in there, one on the wheel side and one on the pulley side. Any help would be very appreciated.

thanks.


7 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#1 posted 07-31-2014 05:35 PM

Don’t know if anyone else would approve, but I’ve used a hacksaw blade to cut a slit in the bushing. Then a torch heating and a screw driver to pry one side of the slit loose. Once you get one side loose you just work it loose around to the other side and pop it out. May not even need a torch. You wouldn’t want to scratch the bore of the pulley up either with the screwdriver. Or even just tap one side of the split with a hammer and punch. Usually when one side breaks free the other does at the same time.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#2 posted 07-31-2014 05:40 PM

Can’t be sure from the exploded diagram, but it looks like there is one main bushing in the bore and you can still buy them (for example, about $10 at ereplacementparts.com). You should be able to press it out.. a shop press would be best, but there are other ways if you don’t have one (or know of someone who will let you borrow theirs). A quick and dirty puller could be made out of some threaded rod and blocks of wood. Alternatively, a large C-clamp might be used instead. As a last resort, you could try finding an appropriate sized socket or pipe to match the diameter and pound it out.

Cheers,
Brad

Edit: Cutting it like TheFridge suggests would would as well, but you need to be careful not to bugger things up more than they already are!

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View louspinuso's profile

louspinuso

4 posts in 866 days


#3 posted 07-31-2014 07:21 PM

thanks for the suggestions. I think I’ll start with the more gentle, threaded rod approach tonight and if that doesn’t work I’ll break out the hacksaw blade and torch (would a propane torche get hot enough or am I going to need to get something hotter)

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#4 posted 07-31-2014 07:54 PM

If you go the hacksaw route, I’ve found it easiest to make two (or more) cuts on opposite sides, just to the point where you are going to break through to the outer surface without actually going through (as close as you can get it). Go slow and careful towards the end to make sure you don’t cut through completely, leaving just a paper thin section at the cuts. Then a small drift punch or screwdriver can be used to pop the sections free.. no heat needed.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3053 days


#5 posted 07-31-2014 10:21 PM

I see your bushes are worn way off centre suggesting something is not running true.I don’t think if you take your time and do things when your not too stressed or tired( I am thinking of myself here sorryLOL) anyway I have a nice engineering workshop and would make my own bushes or could you possibly exact size fir roller bearings ? I don’t know if this is a driving wheel or not . Have fun any small workshop should be able to make you exact bushes or maybe a local technical college or school could help out here In Scotland they have a good reputation with helping local folk with their problems as it gives work for the teachers to show how it’s done to the students. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View louspinuso's profile

louspinuso

4 posts in 866 days


#6 posted 08-01-2014 02:05 PM

Thanks to all the suggestions. A friend of mine came by and we made a press with some threaded rod and large washers using one of my sockets to push through. The diagram doesn’t show it but there are actually 2 separate bushings in there (I’ve read somewhere that other diagrams for similair saws from that time frame show two but this one shows only one, probably an error) with a space for the oil reservoir (which was pretty dry). The problem we ran into was when we were pressing one bushing into the next across the oil reservoir it didn’t line up perfectly. At that point what we did was using a 3/8 inch socket extension, which fit the shoulders just in the bushing and the outer diameter was the same as the bushing luckily, we slid it into the inner bushing and then added a second extension and tried to keep that lined up as true as possible and gently tapped with a hammer.

The end result was that the outer bushing came out nice and easy, but the inner bushing (which was already stuck in the reservoir and free floating) split in half and I then had to gingerly remove it in pieces from the oil reservoir. I must say that the “brass” bushing felt quite soft and was easily bent with pliers so I’m now wondering if the brass was actually replaced at some point by some hack with a piece of copper pipe. In any event, I’m going to go to a local shop today to see if they have actual bearings that would fit my needs, mostly because my shaft is pretty scarred up where the bushings were and I’m guessing proper fitting bearings will make sure that the wheel spins freely regardles of the scarring.

Thanks again for all the suggestions. I’ll keep you all posted on the progress of my $40 band saw.

View louspinuso's profile

louspinuso

4 posts in 866 days


#7 posted 08-07-2014 08:55 PM

Ok, so I finally got my 2 replacement bushings today and it seems that I may need to cut a groove for the oiler. does that make sense? anyone have any idea what the best way to do that is? Also, the best way to put these bushings in would be really great since, to be honest, I’ve never done anything like this before. Can’t wait to get this put together and get a new blade on her. I’ll post pictures later tonight.

Thanks

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com