LumberJocks

Cutting Board With Thick Veneer: Asking for Delamination?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Nicholas Hall posted 07-31-2014 04:13 PM 1124 views 0 times favorited 2 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Nicholas Hall's profile

Nicholas Hall

350 posts in 1571 days


07-31-2014 04:13 PM

I saw a lovely quilted maple cutting board created by FJPetruso recently and I was really impressed. It got me thinking about using thick veneers on cutting boards. It takes less work to produce cutting boards using a thick 1/4” veneer, than it does to laminate a bunch of boards together, but it looks like a million bucks.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/103368#comment-1860526

I wonder whether or not there will be structural issues with it, especially delamination. Granted, using the same species with the same seasonal movement rates will help, as will ensuring that the grain matches (not putting quartersawn on top of flatsawn). That said, cutting boards take an enormous amount of abuse, with constant introduction of moisture through washing.

What do you folks think, are veneers likely to delaminate on a cutting board? If so, what can be done to mitigate the issue?

-- Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. -Groucho Marx


2 replies so far

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2314 days


#1 posted 07-31-2014 04:20 PM

From my perspective when boards get that beautiful, they are not production workhorses that are going to get a lot of abuse. No board should ever be soaked or run through a dishwasher, and if the movement control measures you cite are observed and the board is regularly oiled I would say the board would last a lifetime.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 985 days


#2 posted 07-31-2014 04:33 PM

It wouldn’t hurt to enhance the bond using some sort of mechanical lock, such as shallow splines and/or tenons, as close to the edges as is practical.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com