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Forum topic by BJODay posted 07-28-2014 02:45 AM 804 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BJODay

394 posts in 691 days


07-28-2014 02:45 AM

Topic tags/keywords: band saw craigs list cooling blocks thrust bearing

Hey all,
I found a Delta 14” BS, (28-245) on Craig’s list for $120. I didn’t hesitate and bought it the next day. I’ve never owned or operated a BS.

This model does not have a riser block. The deepest, (vertical cut), is about 6”. I believe is was manufactured in the 90’s. The serial number starts with a “94”. It is single speed with a 1/2 HP motor.

The saw is very clean. I don’t think it’s had much use. The table has surface rust. The thrust bearings are stiff and will need to be replaced. The blade is dull and will need to be replaced. There is no fence. Even w/o any set up and a dull blade, it cut 1” pine easily. Here are some questions I have.

Are bearing guides worth the cost over cooling blocks?

What size blade is good for general purpose?

How many TPI for general purpose VS resawing?

Does anyone know what the speed of this saw is?

Could I add dual pulleys and make this a muti-speed saw?

Would this be too much for a 1/2 horse motor?

Are conventional fences better than magnetic fences?

I appreciate any advice. I post pictures when I clean it up and reassemble it. (It was tough to get down the basement).

BJ


17 replies so far

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1929 posts in 545 days


#1 posted 07-28-2014 02:51 AM

For straight cuts, a 1/2” 3tpi blade works really well. Sometimes I keep a 3/8” blade in because it can do gentle curves and straight cuts half-way decently.

For re-sawing, I can’t recommend the Woodslicer highly enough.

My biggest recommendation: this video by Alex Snodgrass is the best piece I’ve seen on setting up a bandsaw:

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

5831 posts in 604 days


#2 posted 07-28-2014 02:58 AM

I don’t know much but I know my thrust bearings were frozen when I bought my older saw. A little wd40 fixed that and they spin freely now. My opinion about my saw, a buffalo, was that spending a bunch of money for upgrades was silly. I spent $75 for the saw. The blocks are working fine and I am happy with my 1/4 blade for most that I do. Someday I’ll buy a better saw either with the bearings or I’ll add them, but not on this saw.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View BJODay's profile

BJODay

394 posts in 691 days


#3 posted 07-28-2014 03:06 AM

Charles,
I saw the video yesterday. I plan on following his set up system.

Bill,
Thanks for the advice, I’ll try WD-40 before replacing them.

BJ

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11507 posts in 1438 days


#4 posted 07-28-2014 03:23 AM

+1 on Bill’s advice. Hit those thrust bearing with a spritz of Break Free after loosening them up with the WD40 and they should be good to go. I rarely use a fence on either one of my bandsaws and when I resaw I usually use a single point resaw fence and follow a line rather than using the fence like the one on a tablesaw as blade drift can ruin a nice piece of wood very quickly when relying on a straight fence.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

655 posts in 947 days


#5 posted 07-28-2014 04:40 AM

So many questions, so little time!

The table has surface rust. The thrust bearings are stiff and will need to be replaced. The blade is dull and will need to be replaced.

Surface rust is easily taken care of, 6200ZZ bearings are plentiful and cheap, and blades are considered consumables and need to be replaced now and then!

Are bearing guides worth the cost over cooling blocks?

No.. save your money and use the steel blocks it came with. If they are buggered up, just face them flat on a grinder. The myth about ‘heat’ on the blade is just that.. myth. See this review by Jim Mattson over at the Woodworkers Gazette.

What size blade is good for general purpose?

Varies depending on what kind of work you consider ‘general purpose’. I find a 1/4” 6 TPI blade to is good for 99% of what I use the saw for. Others find 3/8 to be a better all around size.

How many TPI for general purpose VS resawing?

TPI is generally chosen based on the thickness of what you are cutting.. thick stuff like resawing needs less teeth (say 1/2” 3TPI), and thinner stuff can use more TPI for a cleaner cut. The size of the blade is generally chosen based on the type of cuts you will be making.. wide blades for straight cuts and narrower blades for curves. There are lots of ‘charts’ available from the various blade manufacturers that can help you determine what is best for the work you will be doing.

Does anyone know what the speed of this saw is?

I think they changed sometime in the 70’s, but the original 14” Delta had a motor that ran at 1725 RPM with a 2.75” pulley combined with an 8” drive pulley, making it around 2200 FPM (2172). I seem to remember them changing to a smaller drive pulley in the 70’s (6” IIRC) which pushes that up to about 2800 FPM. I’m not familar with the pulley sizes on the newer models, but it shouldn’t run any faster than 3000 FPM. You can measure your pulleys and plug them into the SFPM calculator over at the VintageMachinery site to check.

Could I add dual pulleys and make this a muti-speed saw?

I’m sure you probably could.. but the real question is why would you want to?

Would this be too much for a 1/2 horse motor?

Not sure what you mean.. would what be too much? Adding dual groove pullieys? If so, I wouldn’t think it would effect the motor much if at all.

Are conventional fences better than magnetic fences?

Personal preference, so your answers will be varied on that one. To me, a fence is a fence.. be it conventional, magnetic, or a 2×4 and C-clamps; whatever gets the job done. I rarely use a fence, and when I do need one, I have a cheap homemade one salvaged from an old junker table saw that suits my needs, and for years I just used a cut off piece of bed frame angle iron and some clamps.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Roger's profile

Roger

15305 posts in 1552 days


#6 posted 07-28-2014 11:36 AM

All good stuff up above. I have to agree with everyone

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View mski's profile

mski

413 posts in 2728 days


#7 posted 07-28-2014 02:32 PM

I did the same a few years back I paid $200. made in USA., I added riser block, ceramic block guides, Kreg fence and 1 1/2 HP motor.
1/2” TPI Woodslicer hands down , worked well even with the 1/2 HP motor.
Get yourself a Iturra Design catalog, PDFs on the web (has pulleys to change speed) also a good book on setup and use of a band saw
All said I probably got $600 invested, works great .
Good luck
Mark

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL

View BJODay's profile

BJODay

394 posts in 691 days


#8 posted 07-29-2014 02:45 AM

Brad and Mark,
Thanks for the info. I downloaded the Iturra PDF, wow. That will take a while to scan through.

Here are pics of the saw after the initial cleanup. Very little saw dust. Mostly residue from the guide blocks. No dents or dings.

The table cleaned up well with WD-40 and 400 grit paper.

I sprayed WD-40 on the thrust bearings and they freed up. Thanks for that advice. I also sanded the guide bars used to adjust the thrust bearings and guide blocks. It all moves freely now.

I also cleaned up the trunnions and relubed them.

I’ll purchase some blades, smooth out the guide block faces and get it set up. Thanks again for the input.

BJ

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1053 posts in 683 days


#9 posted 07-29-2014 02:51 AM

Good looking saw for $120. Congrats. You’ll love having a bandsaw. I use mine much more than I initially thought I would.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

5831 posts in 604 days


#10 posted 07-29-2014 03:01 AM

That saws looking good. Agreed, you will use it all the time now.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View OldWrangler's profile

OldWrangler

719 posts in 342 days


#11 posted 07-29-2014 04:06 AM

My band saw gets a work out nearly every day. I have a model very similar to yours and it has performed well for 25 years now. For resawing lumber the Woodslicer is the best but expensive. For most of my general work, I get clean cuts and long life from Timber Wolf blades. I like a 1/4”, 14 tooth for things with tight curves like band saw boxes. General work I usually keep a 1/2”, 8 tooth blade and resawing I like a 3/4”, 4 tooth blade.
Prices vary on new blades but most times I will buy 3-4 at a time off a seller on Ebay that has free shipping.

-- I am going to go stand outside so if anyone asks about me, tell them I'M OUTSTANDING!

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1221 posts in 1372 days


#12 posted 07-29-2014 06:03 AM

As above WOODSLICER.for your resale blade 1/2”. I too like the 1/4” Timberwolf but don’t use my 14” BS for curves any more. I got a smaller saw for that.
With the Alex Snodgrass video you will be up and running..I cannot recommend his advice strongly enough. MY band saw is my friend.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3361 posts in 921 days


#13 posted 07-29-2014 09:23 PM

Good looking band saw! Enjoy.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View BJODay's profile

BJODay

394 posts in 691 days


#14 posted 08-04-2014 07:55 PM

I set up the saw last night with a wood-slicer blade. I followed the Snodgrass video. The guide blocks looked gunky, but cleaned up nicely.

It cuts very well. Much faster than I thought. I trimmed through cutting < 0.125” off of some 2” red oak. The slice was square and cut consistantly, no tapering, no waver. Then I started digging through the scrap pile to see what else I could cut. Before I knew it, the time slipped by and it was 11pm. I’ll play with it some more tonight.

Thanks for the advice. I was happy not to spend too much on frills. Maybe I’ll buy some extras when My powerball numbers come through.

BJ

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

406 posts in 1597 days


#15 posted 08-04-2014 07:58 PM

Uh no one seems to have done it yet, so I’ll take the open shot,

YOU SUCK!

Congrats on the saw, looks sweet!

-- Sssshhhh, I'm pretending to be working

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