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Sled to crosscut live edge slab

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Forum topic by CharlesA posted 07-24-2014 04:49 PM 1134 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesA

1929 posts in 551 days


07-24-2014 04:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig question tablesaw

I’m working on a live edge coffee table with a waterfall leg. That means I need to crosscut the slab with a very clean cut, and then I will need those adjoining edges to be at 45° so I can make the 90° for the leg.

My first thought was a simple crosscut sled with t-track parallel to the blade about 12 inches on each side I could use 4 t-track hold downs like these to keep the irregular piece stable for the table saw cut:

The idea would be that I would make the sled with 45° kerf, make the initial cut, flip the off piece over to the other side and then very carefully make the 45° cut on that side as well.

After I get the cuts straight, I am going to join them with full blind splined miters.

What am I not thinking of? Suggestions?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


29 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3574 posts in 1567 days


#1 posted 07-24-2014 04:58 PM

It all depends on the width of the table I suppose. My tablesaw sled will handle 24” wide panels. Your clamp idea will ensure that the panel doesn’t move during the operation. Will the sled ride on a metal runner in the TS slot?

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1831 posts in 521 days


#2 posted 07-24-2014 05:03 PM

Depending on the thickness of the slab, a circular saw might be a better approach.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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CharlesA

1929 posts in 551 days


#3 posted 07-24-2014 05:04 PM

I was going to use wooden runners and wax them. That works well for me on my usual sled.

I didn’t want to mess up my usual sled with the 45° cut at max height.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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CharlesA

1929 posts in 551 days


#4 posted 07-24-2014 05:06 PM

MrJinx,

My thought was that if I got the sled right, I would bet a more precise cut this way. Why would you favor the circular saw?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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mrjinx007

1831 posts in 521 days


#5 posted 07-24-2014 05:16 PM

Charles,
The circular saw may provide a better precision since you are moving the saw which is light weight, not the slab, irregular and heavy. By securing a track across the slab, you can easily cut it with a circular saw.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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CharlesA

1929 posts in 551 days


#6 posted 07-24-2014 05:26 PM

gotcha.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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CharlesA

1929 posts in 551 days


#7 posted 07-24-2014 05:35 PM

Looks like the max cut depth for most circular saws at 45° is 1 3/8.” After I finish flattening, I’ll see if that will be sufficient. Doubt it will.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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mrjinx007

1831 posts in 521 days


#8 posted 07-24-2014 05:48 PM

If you can believe it, the desk I made is 3” thick; after cutting it with the C-saw, I went ahead and cut the rest of it with a hand saw.. Not recommending that as I had to make adjustments with a hand plane. You may want to check into one of these if you plan to make more live edge stuff:
I have the makita. Very intimidating, but amazingly smooth.

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=makita+16+circular+saw&tag=googhydr-20&index=tools&hvadid=31574845277&hvpos=1t2&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4906701476510568160&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_8norgsrnzu_b

-- earthartandfoods.com

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CharlesA

1929 posts in 551 days


#9 posted 07-24-2014 06:03 PM

Thanks. I don’t anticipate doing this more than every year or two, when it strikes my fancy.

I’m curious if anyone has actually crosscut a live edge slab with a sled. I’m all ears about the best approach.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11552 posts in 1444 days


#10 posted 07-25-2014 12:19 AM

Charles, The sled should work fine with the holddowns. The problem I see is deciding where “square” is as both pieces will have to match to create your waterfall joint.

I’m still thinking on this but hopefully a smart guy will chime in!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1100 posts in 178 days


#11 posted 07-25-2014 01:13 AM

Using the band saw might make using a sled easier at a 45 degree angle and would insure that you could cut all the way through.

Just not sure if the throat of your band saw has the capacity to use this method.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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CharlesA

1929 posts in 551 days


#12 posted 07-25-2014 04:18 AM

No on bandsaw capacity. I thought about that. Thanks for the thought.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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timbertailor

1100 posts in 178 days


#13 posted 07-25-2014 04:23 AM



No on bandsaw capacity. I thought about that.

- CharlesA

TS75 has a 2.2” depth of cut at 45 degrees and a 30 day money back guarantee? :)

Sorry. I am always looking for an excuse to buy this bad boy!

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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freddy1962

909 posts in 302 days


#14 posted 07-25-2014 11:27 AM

I agree with mrjinx, that’s how I’d do it. Good secure straightedge. I’ve used the 16” Makita circular saw linked to as an carpenter on jobsites. They are a beast.

-- JEFF Illinois (Banks of the Mississippi)

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CharlesA

1929 posts in 551 days


#15 posted 07-25-2014 01:21 PM

Just checked around—no one rents those big circular saws in Louisville, can’t plop down $700 for a Festool or Makita circular to cut one slab.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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