LumberJocks

HELP My router took a dance on my table saw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Jeremy posted 07-23-2014 02:19 AM 866 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Jeremy's profile

Jeremy

5 posts in 343 days


07-23-2014 02:19 AM

Hello everyone, I was working on a few things in my new shop today and I had to to use my table saw as a make shift work bench we’ll turns out it was a bad idea. I now have a spot on the table where the router decided to go dancing on it creating a few rough scratches on it.My question is what is the best way to smooth it out, I know I won’t get rid of I just want to smooth it so it doesn’t scratch material as it passes over the spot. If sand paper what grit is best. Thanks in advance. Jeremy


16 replies so far

View SouthernWoodworking's profile

SouthernWoodworking

89 posts in 88 days


#1 posted 07-23-2014 02:28 AM



Hello everyone, I was working on a few things in my new shop today and I had to to use my table saw as a make shift work bench we ll turns out it was a bad idea. I now have a spot on the table where the router decided to go dancing on it creating a few rough scratches on it.My question is what is the best way to smooth it out, I know I won t get rid of I just want to smooth it so it doesn t scratch material as it passes over the spot. If sand paper what grit is best. Thanks in advance. Jeremy

- Jeremy


What if you put a piece of hardboard on it? Nice and thin but smooth.

-- Noah Lambert, Georgia, 2x2 Designs.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

856 posts in 586 days


#2 posted 07-23-2014 02:34 AM

You can just sand that out, as long as they aren’t caverns. Don’t be shy on where you start. For big deep scratches, I usually start at 100 or maybe even 80. Start at 100 and see how it is working. Then just sand up to 220. I usually don’t go any higher than that. Doesn’t need to be perfect, just get it smooth.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View Richard Hillius's profile

Richard Hillius

129 posts in 332 days


#3 posted 07-23-2014 02:37 AM

That sucks, sorry to hear that.

Unless it was really bad I would use a sanding block with whatever rough grit you need to get it smooth quickly. There isn’t a huge reason to go past 220 or 300 grit at the high end unless you want to polish the table top. I wouldn’t take a power sander to it unless the damage was over a very large area. I took a random orbit sander to a badly rusted out scroll saw table and ended up with a very clear pattern on it even using finer grit sandpaper. It doesn’t hurt the use of the scroll saw but it removed more material than was needed.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3421 posts in 1622 days


#4 posted 07-23-2014 02:44 AM

If any of the gouges are large enough to catch and hold debris, like 1/8” across or bigger, then I’d fill them with JB Weld and let it set up hard, then sand flush.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

568 posts in 2193 days


#5 posted 07-23-2014 02:44 AM

You gotta a NEW SHOP!...geezzzz

-- Bruce http://plans.sawmillvalley.org http://www.sawmillgirls.com

View NormG's profile (online now)

NormG

4170 posts in 1655 days


#6 posted 07-23-2014 02:49 AM

All good and great ideas above, covers all hat may be needed.

-- Norman

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3945 posts in 1032 days


#7 posted 07-23-2014 02:50 AM

+2 JB Weld or other metal epoxy, if deep enough.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View Jeremy's profile

Jeremy

5 posts in 343 days


#8 posted 07-23-2014 02:59 AM

Thank y’all for all your advice it’s not jb weld bad so I’m gonna try to sand it out. and Bruce my wife said she wanted to park back in her garage so in my mind that was her telling me to build a new shop. It’s a work in progress can’t wait til it’s done so I can get some real work done. Thanks Jeremy

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

185 posts in 1627 days


#9 posted 07-23-2014 03:11 AM

Glad it didn’t decide you were its dance partner instead of the table saw!

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1709 posts in 1760 days


#10 posted 07-23-2014 03:21 AM

I’d personally recommend scraping any high sides of the gouges with a chisel rather than sanding. Sanding with a flexible sanding block will cause some areas around the injury to be lower, as well, even with cast iron. Either you’ve raised metal around the gouges, or the router tore the metal out cleanly. If it tore it metal out cleanly, you have no worries. Lay a good straight edge on the table and see if you have high spots. Only scrape those high spots off.

View InstantSiv's profile

InstantSiv

103 posts in 246 days


#11 posted 07-23-2014 03:59 AM

Has anyone considered rust forming in the gouges? Maybe jb welding it would prevent rust forming in the hard to clean gouges?

-- More is always better. More tools, more power,... oh and more fingers ;)

View Vincent Nocito's profile

Vincent Nocito

437 posts in 2015 days


#12 posted 07-23-2014 12:43 PM

I use a set of old oil stones to remove scratches from the TS. I have the type with three stones glued to a triangular wood block. It is easy to hold and I usually use WD40 as the lubricant. Just work your way through the different grit stones and then wipe clean and treat with rust proofing spray.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

156 posts in 381 days


#13 posted 07-23-2014 01:29 PM

Jeremy, opps.. That’s not good, and I can’t believe you posted it.

From your description, all you’ve got is cosmetic damage. You don’t want to chinger up your chisel, so just get a file, lay it over the damage, and stroke back and forth a few times. If you don’t get any catches, then you have a flat surface and can sand the scratches with an orbit sander at 120 grit. It’s probably cast iron, and you’re not going to cause any more damage than what your router did.

I actually put scratches onto my saw top as guide lines for certain operations I do a lot of, and it doesn’t hurt it at all.

If I don’t cover my saw when the first cloud appears during our rainy season, I usually have to sand the top to remove rust. I work outdoors in Arizona.

Now, if the top is aluminum, you don’t really want to know what my recomendation is…..... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

687 posts in 824 days


#14 posted 07-23-2014 01:41 PM

If the gouges are deep and raised a large ridge you might try a flat file first. Lay it flat on the table and slide it over the ridge until it is knocked down then go with the sand paper or stones. I just read Jerry’s post.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View unbob's profile

unbob

394 posts in 555 days


#15 posted 07-23-2014 03:55 PM

What does a woodworker do when replacing bearings in a precision shaper spindle? Borrow a pipe wrench from a plumber, of course.
The flat file and a small stone to knock down the ridges is the best advice. Sanding a machine working surface would get one fired in a metal working shop.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase