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AC ???

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Forum topic by Shawn Masterson posted 07-20-2014 02:00 PM 695 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 635 days


07-20-2014 02:00 PM

I was recently given a nice window ac. My thoughts are to cut it into the wall. My shop always has this musty smell unless I open the overhead, then it seems like everything sweats. For those that use window ac do you just leave it run or turn it on and off when coming and going. My shop time is very up and down at best. I hate to leave it run up the bill if I’m not out there. I was considering setting it up on a thermostat of sorts so the whole unit would come on and off. I just wondered what you guys do. as always thanks


17 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

900 posts in 173 days


#1 posted 07-20-2014 02:14 PM

I wouldn’t leave it running if I wasn’t there. If I had an AC.

-- "We build our workshops. Then we enjoy the fruits of our labor by laboring for more fruits." - Me

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1885 posts in 1180 days


#2 posted 07-20-2014 02:18 PM

I only run mine when I’m in there and when the temps are high enough. To be honest, a dehumidifier might help you with the musty smell, but the ones I’ve had cost as much to run as the window unit (mine’s an 8K BTU model). The thing is running the AC all the time may make it a little too cool, but it still might be worth trying.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15706 posts in 2905 days


#3 posted 07-20-2014 02:33 PM

Are you sure the window unit doesn’t have a built-in thermostat? It may cut off and on by itself.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 635 days


#4 posted 07-20-2014 02:36 PM

It does have a digital thermostat that kicks the compressor on and off, but the blower and what not are running all the time.

View English's profile

English

241 posts in 164 days


#5 posted 07-20-2014 03:49 PM

Does it have a energy saver cycle. If it does this will shut the unit down, and restart the fan every now and then to pull air across the thermostat to see if cooling is required.

Mine has this and I set my stat at 78 and leave it on. It maintains humidity and keeps my wood closer to the humidity in the house where my projects end up.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View gop1ayoutside's profile

gop1ayoutside

11 posts in 466 days


#6 posted 07-20-2014 04:06 PM

I live on the gulf coast where it is hotter than you know what and 100% humidity for about half the year. I recently installed a window a/c in my detached garage and insulated it so I can make my woodworking a year-round hobby (thread linked here).

My strategy so far is to leave it running all the time set at a pretty high temp (I use 81) which keeps the humidity down significantly but doesn’t run the compressor near as much as if it’s set in the low 70s which is what I turn it down to when I am in there to work. The shop is not yet fully up and running so I have not completed any projects yet and I can’t speak to how well this controls wood moisture but I am sure being acclimated to the air conditioned shop is much closer to the humidity level in a living space than being acclimated to the raw conditions of a gulf coast summer.

View Crank50's profile

Crank50

100 posts in 263 days


#7 posted 07-20-2014 04:07 PM

Two questions.
Is the BTU of the AC correct for the Sq. Ft area of the shop?
- you should have about 25 to 30 BTU per Sq. Ft.
- example: my shop is 384 Sq.Ft. X 30 BTU = 11,500 BTU so I bought a 12,000 BTU AC.

Is your shop insulated?
- If it is not insulated it will be very expensive to run the AC all the time.
- Ventilation will help keep the space somewhat cooler during “OFF Time” for the AC.
- When I get my insulation done I’ll leave my AC on with the thermostat at 78 to 80 degrees.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 635 days


#8 posted 07-20-2014 04:44 PM

the shop is fair sized @ 780 sf. The shop is well insulated with about r45 in ceiling r15 walls, and shaded most of the day by neighbors pine trees. the unit is 12k btu, undersized but free. I live in northern Indiana. Right now we have 60 at night and 80 during the day with varying humidity, but normally high. I have no real experience with window ac, I have always had central air (CA) or no air in the house. It sounds like the energy saver cycle will make it act like CA witch is what I am looking for. My major concern is the ambient dust and the blower running all the time.

View English's profile

English

241 posts in 164 days


#9 posted 07-20-2014 05:30 PM

My shop is 672 sf, my unit is heat and cool 12,000 btu. It handles my shop, I have seen 103 degree days and 10 degree days handled with no problem, my shop is insulated but not as well as yours.

The one you have should be big enough.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View mudflap4869's profile

mudflap4869

430 posts in 146 days


#10 posted 07-20-2014 05:35 PM

Cross ventilation is important to reduce moisture. Gable vents and an automatic fan might be your least expensive answer. Seasoning lumber is accomplished by air swipe; air curent moving across the surface draws the moisture out. Think dehydrator. Stick and stack your lumber and place a simple box fan above it to move the air past it and save the A/C for your shop office/mancave.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1981 posts in 1918 days


#11 posted 07-20-2014 05:57 PM

I put in a 12K split system AC w/heat pump. It has no problem keeping the set point temp (77). Ceiling is R38, four inch insulation all four walls. We replaced the siding on our house a couple of years ago and I had the contractor insulate the outside wall.

Much better than the 100 deg days outside of the past. :-)

Go for it. You could even put it on a timer if you like.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1885 posts in 1180 days


#12 posted 07-20-2014 06:32 PM

Shawn, I doubt that unit is undersized for the way you’re set up. To compare, I have a 768 sq. ft. shop in more or less the same climate, and I have R45 ceiling with R19 walls (and a 16’ ft. OH door, one entry door) but no shade. The 8K btu window unit I use is taxed on really hot days (90º+), but otherwise adequate. The equipment (especially the DC) can over power it when run a lot, but it’s actually not as bad as I thought it would be. I had to go with that size because the one I wanted (a 12K) wouldn’t fit on the smallish windows the builder put in. You don’t always hear folks mention the heat load from a DC, but mine seems considerable…..wish I could vent it outside. I guess that air movement comes with a price in heat load. I’m not contesting Crank’s numbers, just offering my experience.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

4858 posts in 543 days


#13 posted 07-20-2014 06:45 PM

I turn it on when it’s hot out there. If I’m gonna be out there several days in a row, I’ll leave it on overnight but at a higher temp and then set it back down in the morning. Works great for me.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 635 days


#14 posted 07-20-2014 07:38 PM

Right on thanks guys. I will update you when I do it. If I remember I will try to video and blog it.

View Todd's profile

Todd

249 posts in 363 days


#15 posted 07-21-2014 02:10 PM

I have exactly the same numbers as Crank.

Mine has an energy saver cycle. I raise the thermostat when I’m not working so it doesn’t run so much while still keeping the humidity in my shop in check.

-- Todd, Huntsville, AL

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