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Pinned Box Joint?

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Forum topic by RippKutt posted 07-20-2014 02:13 AM 751 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RippKutt

11 posts in 928 days


07-20-2014 02:13 AM

Hello Jocks. I live in a thirty yr old condo. The kitchen cabs are all built in(particle brd and formica). I’d like to make new boxes for the drawers using 1/2” ply. The drawer faces screw into the drawer box from the inside. The back rail of my box will fit into dados to be glued and screwed. At this time I can’t do dovetailing. So…. If I use a simple box joint with glue for the front of the box, can I drill vertically thru the joint and pin it with a finish nail? Is this overkill or worth time? I await your suggestions. Thanks, Dennis


12 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3580 posts in 1568 days


#1 posted 07-20-2014 02:55 AM

For plywood drawer boxes I would stick with rabbeted joints. If you want to upgrade to solid wood sides, then you can do box joints or get a dovetail jig.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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kdc68

2081 posts in 1032 days


#2 posted 07-20-2014 03:04 AM

Agreed with pintodeluxe…...A version of a rabbet joint I’d use is the locking rabbet

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View crank49's profile

crank49

3524 posts in 1726 days


#3 posted 07-20-2014 03:56 AM

Lock rabbet joint is good. I have used it often.

In solid wood a regular box joint is tested and confirmed to be just as strong as a dovetail; no need to pin.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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jumbojack

1221 posts in 1379 days


#4 posted 07-20-2014 04:16 AM

+1 for the locking rabbet

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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spclPatrolGroup

232 posts in 1650 days


#5 posted 07-20-2014 05:32 AM

For my kitchen I used simple rabbits a little glue and some finish nails since I had to make a lot of them and on a deadline. I don’t even notice the joinery in day to day use.

-- Dave, from ND "The mind is an infinitely long workbench, and its cluttered with half-finished thoughts and ideas, sometimes we need to clear off the workbench and start again from step one."

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NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1332 days


#6 posted 07-20-2014 06:41 AM



Agreed with pintodeluxe…...A version of a rabbet joint I d use is the locking rabbet

- kdc68


+1. That’s my favorite joint for drawers.
Here's a great article showing how it’s done.
It shows the setup for a table saw, but it works on a router table just as good. Though if you have a bunch to do, the table saw and dado set is faster.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

16043 posts in 1622 days


#7 posted 07-20-2014 01:41 PM

A regular lock rabbit is a good joint if it is done right. I’ve used it on some shop cabinets and they seem to be holding up well. Modern glue is quite amazing.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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AlaskaGuy

839 posts in 1064 days


#8 posted 07-20-2014 04:37 PM

Another vote for lock rabbit for plywood drawers.

For solid wood drawers if using box joints I think to pin them is overkill.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View RippKutt's profile

RippKutt

11 posts in 928 days


#9 posted 07-20-2014 11:08 PM

Hi again Jocks. Thanks for the replies. I’ll go with the rabbet joint. Next question… drawer box bottom? I have 1/4” Luan laying around but it finishes crappy. Maybe sandeply or hardboard from the Orange Store. What thickness? This is for kitchen drawers with utensils and gadgets. I await your suggestions. Thanks, Ripp.

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kdc68

2081 posts in 1032 days


#10 posted 07-20-2014 11:33 PM

1/4” should be fine for utensils and gadgets. Keep in mind 1/4” plywood isn’t necessarily 1/4. Chances are it will be more like 7/32nd”.

Here’s a method to create the perfect width groove. I’m sure others will post with their methods.

A couple of passes with the table saw will create the groove for the bottom. Make one initial pass with all your drawer pieces, then tweak the fence over and make the second pass. Test cut with scrap until you get the correct width of groove…

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1332 days


#11 posted 07-21-2014 12:05 AM

Yep, 1/4” sold be fine. The bottoms on the drawers in my apartment are 1/4” hardboard and they’re fine. I prefer baltic birch plywood as it’s very strong even at 1/4”.

You can build a test drawer with the luan and subject it to various loads to see if it meets your needs.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11564 posts in 1445 days


#12 posted 07-21-2014 12:53 AM

I too like the lock rabbit joint for most drawers. I only pin box joints when I’m not going to glue them.

Dry erase board makes great drawer bottoms as it really increases the visability in the drawer (almost like having a lighted drawer)

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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