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End grain cutting board question

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Forum topic by gimphead posted 07-15-2014 01:33 PM 1225 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gimphead

6 posts in 1262 days


07-15-2014 01:33 PM

I am trying to build a couple of end grain cutting boards with a specific design and am looking for input. I would like the boards to have some initials in them and can’t figure out the best way to lay out the pattern. The only thing I can come up with would be the cut a ton of individual blocks and try to stack them together for the glue up. Can you experts give me a better way to put a “J” in the middle of one of these cutting blocks?


17 replies so far

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mahdee

3548 posts in 1228 days


#1 posted 07-15-2014 01:45 PM

Sorry, I don’t understand the question. You want one J in the middle?

-- earthartandfoods.com

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gimphead

6 posts in 1262 days


#2 posted 07-15-2014 01:50 PM

Yes. A “J” out of walnut buried in the middle of and end grain board with the rest of it made from maple.

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Yonak

979 posts in 981 days


#3 posted 07-15-2014 01:55 PM

If it were me, I would work small rather than trying to put the whole board together at once. Just work on the “J” and the other pieces around it. Glue that up, then square the sides and glue up the rest of the board with that in the middle. I hope this answer is appropriate. I didn’t understand any specific problems you are having.

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mahdee

3548 posts in 1228 days


#4 posted 07-15-2014 04:38 PM

You can use a router and letter template and cut a J on both side making it appear it goes all the way through.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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gimphead

6 posts in 1262 days


#5 posted 07-15-2014 04:58 PM

Didn’t give that a thought. You think the inlay would hold up on a cutting block?

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bondogaposis

4023 posts in 1811 days


#6 posted 07-15-2014 05:58 PM

Generally end grain boards are made by gluing up a long grain board then slicing it up and rotating the slices so that the end grain is up, then gluing the whole thing back together. In the case of putting the letter J in the middle you will have make it long grain then slice a piece off and then incorporate into the rest of the board. The letter could be made by assembling various strips of contrasting wood to form the letter.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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mahdee

3548 posts in 1228 days


#7 posted 07-15-2014 06:01 PM

Yes, it will hold.. Just make it deep enough. If you want, you can go half way on each side.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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gimphead

6 posts in 1262 days


#8 posted 07-15-2014 06:21 PM

Thanks for the help guys. Probably much too new to this woodworking to be trying something like this but we’ll see how it turns out.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19172 posts in 2135 days


#9 posted 07-15-2014 10:38 PM

It is “funny” that you should post this question….
As I to want to incorporate a “J” into an end grain cutting board.
I was trying to figure out this exact same “problem”!!!

Good luck with you board. I look forward to seeing the resulting board.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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ChuckV

2880 posts in 2987 days


#10 posted 07-15-2014 10:44 PM

If the ‘J’ goes all the way through, there will be a backwards ‘J’ on the bottom. Is this what you want?

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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retfr8flyr

327 posts in 1129 days


#11 posted 07-15-2014 11:21 PM

The way end grain boards are made it would be extremely difficult to try and make the letter part of the whole board. Like suggested cutting an inlay would be the most practical way. If you really want it to match you could glue together pieces of Walnut so that you could cut the inlay letter out making it end grain. I think it would probably work out better to just make the inlay long grain though.

-- Earl

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Yonak

979 posts in 981 days


#12 posted 07-15-2014 11:36 PM


If the J goes all the way through, there will be a backwards J on the bottom. Is this what you want?

- ChuckV

If you wanted to do is as a glue-up, you could glue it up at least 1/8” extra think, and then resaw it in half, flip one over and re-glue it back together. When dry, square up the sides.

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AandCstyle

2561 posts in 1717 days


#13 posted 07-15-2014 11:45 PM

Here is one I did. If you are interested, I will be happy to answer any questions you might have.

-- Art

View gimphead's profile

gimphead

6 posts in 1262 days


#14 posted 07-16-2014 10:23 AM

OK AandC style, YOU NAILED IT. That thing is absolutely awesome. Can you let me know how you dealt with some of the issues the guys have brought up? Very cool work by the way.

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AandCstyle

2561 posts in 1717 days


#15 posted 07-17-2014 01:03 AM

1. I bought Jeremy Greiner's software. It was about $10 IIRC. It is very easy to use and includes a tutorial and a few sample boards.
2. I laid out the design in excel resizing the rows and columns to the desired thickness of the “slices”, 3/4 inch in this one, and the overall dimensions. Each column in excel will be a slice. The slices that have the same design will become “panels”.
3. I used the excel diagram to create the panels. This will make sense once you look at the software.
4. Then the software tells you the sizes and quantity of pieces you will need for each species used, the species layout for each slice, then the glue up order for all the slices.

I only use block letters to make boards like this one. Since you only intend to have a single letter J in the field, you will need to make the panels that only require a single slice wider than necessary for safety’s sake when cutting them on the TS. Yes, the letter(s) are backward on the reverse side, but I suggest keeping the front for display and cutting on the back side. That precludes using feet however.

Once you have looked at Jeremy’s software, PM me if you have further questions.

-- Art

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