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Forum topic by Theartoftraditional posted 50 days ago 545 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Theartoftraditional

3 posts in 50 days


50 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: logs to lumber

I am getting into woodworking, and I was wondering what are the different ways to mill logs and how would I go about doing them?


12 replies so far

View Timberwerks's profile

Timberwerks

304 posts in 1798 days


#1 posted 50 days ago

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1383 posts in 404 days


#2 posted 50 days ago

My experience so far has been that you can buy $1000 worth of lumber form a sawmill. Or, you can spend $6000- $8000 on a do it yourself sawmill. You can have a sawmill, but you still have to get your trees from someone. But, if you don’t want to do that, you have to have heavy duty truck and a trailer. Then you need a place to store your wood for 1” per year. All in all, dedicated truck, trailer, insurance, registration, saw blades, paying for trees, spending the time to cut them and so on… You will end up with a bunch of wood 1/3 of which you will throw away. My suggestion, go to a sawmill and store the wood for one year per inch or pay for it to be kiln-dried or buy the lumber from a lumber store. It all depends on how deep you want to get into the trade.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

775 posts in 572 days


#3 posted 50 days ago

MrJinx is correct when it comes to milling large amounts of wood, or even medium amounts of wood. If you are willing to do some very small-time milling, as in grabbing logs off of the curb or out of the back yard, you might be able to do some basic small milling with a good bandsaw. You would need to employ the use of a milling jig such as this one.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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Timberwerks

304 posts in 1798 days


#4 posted 49 days ago

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10760 posts in 1327 days


#5 posted 49 days ago

I have milled lumber with a chainsaw mill (Alaskan) which is the least expensive method but a LOT of work and painfully slow.

I have milled smaller logs on a 17” bandsaw. Better, but still slow and resaw blades are expensive/don’t last long.

I currently mill logs with a Woodmizer LT15 manual mill I bought on CL. It is FAST, blades are inexpensive (and are resharpenable for $7 each!).

I have found the 1 year per inch of thickness drying “rule” to be totally wrong. Our lumber air dries to 12-15% in 3-4 months depending on the time of year. And our average daily humidity is 60%.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1100 posts in 1113 days


#6 posted 48 days ago

”I have found the 1 year per inch of thickness drying “rule” to be totally wrong.”

That is so true, but it is such an ingrained misconception that I have about given up on trying to correct it. I am sure that climate in some areas restrict drying to late Spring into early Fall because of ice and snow. Here in Georgia, wood air dries year round.

A good moisture meter takes all the myths and guess-work out of the equation.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

13854 posts in 975 days


#7 posted 48 days ago

I used the Alaskan chainsaw mill for 2 years. Worked fine, just slow. I built a sawmill for about $3000 about 1-1\2 years ago. I have cut about 7,000 board feet with it. Worth every penny. I love cutting my own wood. I hope to cut and stack another 10,000 board feet yet this fall.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

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Monte Pittman

13854 posts in 975 days


#8 posted 48 days ago

The type of wood makes a huge difference for drying as well. Beetle Kill Pine is dry in 30 days, hardwood, much slower.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1383 posts in 404 days


#9 posted 48 days ago

I agree, every climate, storage methods and species of wood are a determining factor as to drying time. 1” per year is a general term used if you don’t have a moisture meter. Here is some additional information that might be of a use to you:
http://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/drying-wood-at-home/":http://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/drying-wood-at-home/

-- earthartandfoods.com

View summerfi's profile

summerfi

1007 posts in 324 days


#10 posted 48 days ago

If you don’t want to invest the time and money others have mentioned, and if your logs are too big for a bandsaw, or you don’t have a bandsaw, then you should find someone in your area with a portable bandsaw mill and have them mill the logs.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- "Of all the tools I own, my favorite is a good sharp pocket knife." - My Dad

View Theartoftraditional's profile

Theartoftraditional

3 posts in 50 days


#11 posted 48 days ago

I thank you all for your suggestions, I am thinking of using an Alaskan mill when I get the money, now the problem is termites in my log stash

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10760 posts in 1327 days


#12 posted 48 days ago

You really can’t fully appreciate a bandmill until you have used a chainsaw mill for a while!

Those chainsaw mills are definitely for the young!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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